Drawing on Doilies

Do you have any doilies in the back of a cabinet that could use a little marker and sticker beautification?

Why limit yourself to plain ol’ 8.5 x 11 paper when there are so many paper options out there?

We’ve been experimenting with drawing on teeny-tiny paper, gigantic rolls of paper, coffee filters, post-its, tape, and now doilies.

I love browsing dollar stores for fun odds and ends that can take on new lives in our art studio (it’s my achilles heel, if you were to ask my husband), and I spotted three different sizes of paper doilies that sang to me from across the aisles.

Did you know that doilies are known for their singing? Anyhoo, I picked them up, along with a gold sequin tiara for dress-up and kitchen tools that will make great sand toys.

Materials

  • Paper Doilies
  • Markers
  • Glue
  • Sequins, pom-poms, stickers, etc.
  • Any other mark-making tools you can dream up

The invitation: I laid out markers and sequins during my daughter’s nap, and when she woke up we made some energetic doily drawings.

The fun thing about doilies is that they pose all kinds of neat challenges to the artist:

  • The round shape offers a suggestion to create circular marks
  • Doilies are full of little bumps and holes that challenge the artist to go around them, over them, or simply deal with them!

What else could we do with our doilies?

Celebration Flags

The town next to us boasts a fabulous kids parade every Fourth of July, where kids of all sizes decorate a vehicle of their choice and then parade down the main street, ending at the park for a big festival of music, hotdogs, and bouncy houses. This is our second year in the parade:  Last year I did all the decorating, but this year N and I collaborated on a triangle banner to adorn her wagon.  We talked about the parade all morning, and she was enthusiastic about the process of drawing circles, dashes and dots all over her triangles.

This really simple project could be spun in a hundred different directions (see links below for other ideas), and it’s a great way to add some bling to your yard, wagon, bedroom, patio, birthday party, etc.

What’s the hook?

  • Your child will reflect on a holiday, idea, or celebration (i.e. Fourth of July, Nature, Birthday)
  • Your child will have an opportunity to collaborate
  • Your child will be part of a process of contributing to an important celebration.

Time

20+ minutes

Materials

  • Paper
  • Scissors (for the adult)
  • Drawing materials; crayons, markers, paint, etc. (we used markers)
  • Yarn, ribbon, or twine
  • Masking or Clear Tape

Directions

  • Cut paper into shape of choice. We made triangles. I cut 8.5 x 11 paper in half, and then cut free-hand triangles from the paper (we were in a hurry!).
  • Give your child a stack of triangle papers, and keep some for yourself.
  • Draw on your papers, and encourage your child to draw on his or hers’. Since it was the 4th of July, I drew red and blue stars. My daughter has been into circles and dots lately, so that’s what she drew.
  • Cut a piece of string to the desired length.  Leave a little extra on either end to tie it off.
  • Tape the top/back of each triangle, side-by-side, to the string.
  • Voila — you have a banner!
  • Extra fancy, extra credit: If you plan to see both sides of the banner, glue another set of triangles to the back of each piece.  And, if you have time and a sewing machine, you could sew these together with some pretty, wide ribbon for a more lasting creation.  See “Sew a Simple Fourth of July Banner” below.

Related Projects

Sew a Simple Fourth of July Banner

Tutorial: No sew triangle pennant banner with kids

Garden Wish Flags

Newspaper Bunting: A Tutorial

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Big, Bad, Porcelain Canvas

In preparation for a recent trip to Boston, friends suggested that I stock up on new toys to entertain my child on the airplane.  So, along with purchasing a Mrs. Potato Head and an Elmo DVD (a moment of weakness for our almost-TV-free home that thankfully paid off), I found these great washable bathtub crayons in a local beauty supply store.

I knew these would be a hit after seeing our almost-2 year old “washing” the sides of the bathtub with bars of soap and sponges.  Drawing on the bath seemed to be a natural extension of that!

Obviously, this wasn’t a plane toy, but what better place to test out bathtub crayons (that are supposed to wash off, but do we know for sure?) than in a hotel bathtub?  You’re with me, right?  I wish I was able to capture the visuals a little better, but I was busy getting a little wet as my daughter drew and erased the drawings at least four times.  I usually refrain from drawing on my child’s pictures, but she asked me to make some stars, which she promptly filled with expressive marks.  And the good news is that in the end, it all cleaned up perfectly!

The best part of this activity, in my opinion, is extending the process of mark-making beyond the piece of paper or easel. This is one of those “thinking outside the box” activities that can help kids understand that there can be more than one way to do something.  Not to mention, a lot of joy can come from freely moving greasy crayons all over a huge porcelain canvas.

Playdough Tools

If you have a batch of playdough and could use some ideas for how to play with it, we’re going to dig into that today! If you don’t have any playdough, and want to know how to make playdough, click here. 

Playdough tools

I collect tools from everywhere: online shops, toy stores, play kitchen tools, my kitchen, second hand shops.

Playdough Tool Ideas

note: this list contains affiliate links

The possibilities are truly endless. At 16 months, it was enough for my daughter to just squish it and move balls of dough from one bowl to another. At 20 months, she wanted to cut it, so we introduced a safe wooden “knife” that we got for free from our local cupcake shop.  Lately, at almost 2 years, she likes to “cook” muffins and cookies and tacos, and I’m grateful to whoever makes play dishes, rolling pins, and cookie cutters!

What can you do with Playdough?

  • Roll the dough into worms and balls
  • Smoosh it into pancakes
  • Stamp it
  • Poke it with forks and straws
  • Make play baked goods
  • Make “dinner” for the family

Teach children to use scissors with Playdough

This is one of my very favorite ways to teach children how to use scissors, and it’s far easier than cutting paper!

If you want to help your child learn how to use scissors, roll out some worms and show them how to cut them with safety scissors (affiliate). Cutting dough can be incredibly rewarding to kids who are frustrated by cutting paper, which is really not the easiest thing to do!

Playdough tools | TinkerLab.com

Prepare your Playdough Area

One last thing — try to avoid playdough in a carpeted area. If it gets in a rug, it can be torture to get it out.

We work on a very forgiving table, but if your workspace is an unfinished table, you can pick up inexpensive plastic sheeting or oil cloth (affiliate), at your local hardware store.

Just Play!

My best advice is to just put it out with a bunch of tools, play, and see what happens. Also, pay attention to your child’s cues for more ideas. If they’re using the dough to create an imaginary world, you could introduce small toy animals to the play. If they’re interested in backing, add a spatula and cookie sheet. The bottom line — have fun!

More Playdough Ideas

If you want to make your own playdough, this is the best recipe. 

Would you like more playdough tool ideas? This post shares 3 playdough tools that you may already have.

Add a new scent to your playdough such as pumpkin pie

If you want to make glow in the dark playdough, you’ll love this recipe.

Want to get creative? Click here and learn how to make masa playdough!

 

Exploring Glue

Who doesn’t love playing with glue?  I have a strong memory of covering both my hands in glue with my best friend at summer camp, and then seeing the look of horror on our counselor’s face when we mischievously started peeling off our own “skin.”  I’m not advocating for that kind of behavior here, but my point is that there are endless possibilities for creating and playing with glue:  it can be used as an adhesive or a paint, it can be squeezed or dripped, and it has a delightful (and for some, disgusting) sticky quality that is fun to touch…and sometimes peel.  There are lots of recipes out there for home-made glue, but I love good old-fashioned Elmer’s School Glue.  It’s non-toxic, inexpensive, and works really well.

Exploration Connections:

  • When playing with glue, children can learn about viscosity, and how one object can adhere to another, sometimes permanently.
  • Children will also make choices about which objects they want to use, where to place them, and how many to include on the paper, helping them experience decision-making skills and autonomy in a lovely way (rather than throwing an “I want THAT cookie” fit in the grocery store).

Time:

Set-up: 5 minutes (after materials are gathered and/or purchased)

Activity:  5+ minutes, depending on the child’s ability, interest, distractions, etc.

Materials:

  1. Paper
  2. Glue
  3. Disposable Bowls
  4. Small objects for gluing (i.e. feathers, pom-poms, leaves, macaroni)

Activity:

  1. Squeeze enough glue into a disposable bowl to fill its bottom.  (After the glue dries, you can use the bowl again for another gluing activity.  Hoorah for recycling!)
  2. On your own paper, show your child how to dip an object in the glue and place it on the paper.  Hold your paper sideways or upside-down (depending on the weight of the object) to demonstrate that the glue is holding the object in place.  Next, encourage them to try, and ask them what they’re doing and/or comment on their process by saying things like, “You’re dipping the noodle in the glue and dripping glue on the paper.  And now you’re placing it on the blue paper.”
  3. Alternatively, give your child a small glue bottle and show them how to squeeze it on the paper.  They can then place the objects on the small dot or pile of glue.  This is a great option for kids who don’t want to touch the glue, and also helps children understand the physics of squeezing a bottle to release a liquid.

Another idea for the preschool crowd: Writing with glue as a preschooler

Creativity in the Garden

Spring is here (!!!), and for us that means it’s time play outside and start a garden.

Children learn through play, and for them “play” is “work.”  So this is a great opportunity to let them “play” while learning about seeds, digging holes, packing mulch, and watering.  All you need are some play clothes, a few plants, a pot or bit of land, soil, and a trowel or two.  Not to fret if you don’t have land — this activity can be easily adapted to an indoor space (such a kitchen) or patio with a few pots and a small bit of dirt.

You can start with the following simple instructions, and then go from there…make garden art, build a musical fence, play with the hose, build a birdhouse, look for snails, or collect leaves.  The options are endless.  More inspiration on gardening with kids can be found here: http://www.thekidsgarden.co.uk/

Creativity Connections:

  • Gardens can be a place to gain problem-solving skills. For example, children can explore how deep they need to dig holes, how much water it takes to fill a watering can, and they can make decisions about where they want to plant seeds or plants.
  • Ask the child problem-solving questions such as, “What shall we plant in this large hole?  The strawberries, the sage, or the tomatoes?”
  • Ask the child invention-building questions such as, “What do you suppose we could do with this trowel?”

Time:

  • If you’re planting a pot or two, once you’ve gathered your materials, this activity could be done in 1/2 hour. Children who enjoy the sandbox, may linger over the joys of digging dirt and could use more time.  For a larger garden space, give yourself at least an hour…possibly more. Attention spans can be short, but once outside, time can go by quickly with all of the distractions of bugs, dirt, digging, water, and mud.

Materials:

  1. Planting pots or  a clear spot of earth
  2. Soil
  3. Plants: veggies, herbs and small flowers are great for small hands
  4. Seeds
  5. Trowels:  one adult size and one child size.  Spoons can work too.
  6. Gardener’s knee pad (not necessary, but really helpful) — get two if you can!
  7. Spray bottle: not really necessary for gardening, but little gardeners adore playing with these
  8. Watering can or hose. Small watering cans are easy to find in drugstores as part of sandbox kits this time of year.
  9. Play clothes

Directions:

  1. Talk with your child about what you’re planning to do:  You can choose the plants together or have them ready on “planting day.”
  2. Show your child the tools you’ll be using, and explain how you’ll use them (i.e. dig holes, put plants in the ground, water the plants).
  3. As you’re placing seeds or plants in the dirt, explain the process to your child so that they hear what they’re doing while actually doing it.  This helps solidify their learning.  Also, be sure to ask them what they’re doing, to get their take on it.
  4. Be prepared for a MESS!  It’s inevitable, but also part of the fun.
  5. After the plants and/or seeds are in place, don’t forget to water them.
  6. Once you’re done, recap the gardening process with your child by reminding them of what you just accomplished and asking them what they did, and encourage your child to play in the garden.

Dirt-free Alternative:

If you don’t have a garden, can’t stand the sight of dirt, or you’re facing a rainy day, plant some seeds indoors.  We eat a lot of avocados around here, and a fun, simple activity is “planting” avocado pits.  Check out these simple instructions.  All you need is an avocado pit, 3 toothpicks, a glass, water, and A LOT of patience.  So simple!   Be sure to plant a few just in case they don’t all “pop.”  Ours were planted three weeks ago, and we’re still waiting for them to sprout!