Baby Food Candle Jars

cutting paper

Despite putting my best foot forward toward making my own baby food, I’ve still succumbed to buying jars of smashed peas and pureed peaches for handy food on-the-go. While all of our jars get recycled, it’s hard to ignore the quantity of glass or the art-making potential in these adorable little vessels. I allowed about ten of them to pile up before this project hit me. Not only do I like how they turned out, but it’s also one of those crafts that’s child-driven. And if you know me, you know that I like my art projects to be open-ended. If you also have a stack of these cuties in your dish rack begging to be repurposed, you might also want to scroll through the links at the end of this post for more ideas.

Materials

  • Baby Food Jars with the labels removed
  • Tissue Paper
  • Mod Podge
  • Paint Brush
  • Scissors
  • Glitter (optional)

Cut the tissue paper up into pieces. I cut a bunch of these ahead of time since I wasn’t sure how invested N would be in this step. But of course, she loves cutting, and we had a bounty of tissue paper pieces in no time at all!

I limited the palette to pink, light blue, and white with a red pattern (saved from an Anthropologie gift…lucky me!), and recommend this as a unifying strategy if you’re going for something seasonal or to match your couch.

I poured some Mod Podge into one of the jars and N mixed in some glitter for an extra-sparkly effect. If you’ve never used Mod Podge, it’s similar to white glue and does an amazing job at both gluing and sealing. Mod Podge Rocks is a fabulous blog that’s brimming with Mod Podge ideas.

We placed the tissue papers into clear containers for easy spotting. With a brush, my daughter painted glue on the outside of the jars and covered them with tissue paper of her choice. I didn’t want to miss out on the fun and made a few, too!

I was impressed when she came up with the stumpy-hand technique for covering the jars mess-free!

To seal them well, I gave each jar a goodly overall layer of Mod Podge before turning them upside down for drying.

We’ve been decorating our summer table with them, but given the palette, wouldn’t these be sweet decorations for a baby shower? Looking for Mod Podge? You can buy it here!

So, I know I’m not the only one trying to come up with baby food jar ideas. Tell me, please, what you’ve done with baby food jars!!

More Baby Food Jar Crafts from around the web

Fabric Tea Light Baby Food Jars from Prudent Baby

Tons of Ideas for re-purposing baby food jars from Making Friends

Gluing knick-knacks to baby food jars from The Mother Huddle

12 Ways to Re-Use Baby Food Jars from Chasing Green

Personalized Tea Light Holders from Radical Crafts

 

Bubble Print Lunch Bag

Bubble Print Lunch Bag

We made prints from some bubble wrap I rescued from a recent package. It was one of those projects that came together quickly — I can’t remember why exactly, but I didn’t have my camera ready. The good news is that I collected lots of good material on this topic…scroll to the bottom for tutorials and inspiration.

But this is really about what we did AFTER making the prints. While we were waiting for N’s dad to come home from work we decided to decorate a lunch bag for him. We tend to get all crafty on his lunches every few weeks, and the usual markers-on-bag wasn’t that interesting to N. I pulled out one of our bubble wrap prints and asked her if she’d like to collage it to the bag. This child jumps at any opportunity to utilize a pair of scissors, and happily snipped away at the print. After cutting it into pieces, she used white glue to adhere them to the bag — both sides — and once the bag was filled I punched two holes and tied a ribbon through it.

My husband loved it, and proudly carted it off to work the next day. Next time it would also be fun to use cut-up magazines, unwanted pieces of art, envelope liners, or old books.

What other materials would you use?

More inspiration

Jean at The Artful Parent made bubble wrap prints with her Toddler Art Group

Bubble Wrap Print from MaryAnn Kohl’s First Art

Bubble Printing Shamrock Diptych from hands on: as we grow

Layered multi-colored Bubble Prints from Laugh Paint Create

Clear photo tutorial on bubble printing from First Palette

+++++

This post is linked to Craft Schooling Sunday

 

Coffee Filter Flowers

flower

We recently started using a Chemex coffee pot (next to Blue Bottle, it makes the BEST coffee ever — anyone else with me?) and we had a stack of old filters collecting dust, waiting to be repurposed into watercolor coffee filter flowers!

I mixed a little water to liquid watercolors, and added droppers. You could also use food coloring and scavenge droppers from old bottles of Baby Tylenol.

The set-up

  • Watercolors
  • Flat-bottom coffee filters
  • Droppers
  • Tray to catch spills
  • Covered table
  • Bowl of Sequins (not necessary, but N insisted on this…you’ll soon see why)
  • Green Pipe Cleaners

Squeeze some watercolor on the filters until you reach desired color combination/saturation level. You may not really care about the aesthetics at all, as the activity of squeezing watery paint is so enjoyable in its own right. If that’s the case, keep on squeezing!

And add some sequins, googly eyes, and fake plastic nails while you’re at it! I love how children are filled with their own novel ideas and believe it’s important to encourage imaginative play at every opportunity.

Over the course of half and hour, we worked side-by-side to color a bunch of coffee filters and let them dry overnight.

The next day, we had fun chopping the filters up into snowflakes, and wearing them as crowns. This was all N’s idea. And she decided her baby sister needed a crown too. You never know where art activities are going to take you!

To make the flowers (and these next steps are all me)…

1. Stack about 5 coffee filters like pancakes. I sandwiched unpainted filters between painted ones to give it more contrast.

2. Accordion-fold the filter stack and secure it with a pipe cleaner

Pull out the filters individually, giving it a all a nice puff.

And proudly display your Spring bouquet.

Find this post on My Delicious Ambiguity, ABC and 123, Play Academy @ Nurturstore, We Play

Dream Catcher

DSC_0741

“If you have bad dreams you have to spit them out of your mouth and into the dream catcher.”

After a recent visit with some friends in their new house, my daughter could not stop talking about a dream catcher that they had. And she wanted one for herself. Of course. She also wanted a lofted bunk bed, but this isn’t a home decor blog, thank goodness!

The great part about this dream catcher moment is that her actual question was, “Can we MAKE a dream catcher?” Um, yes we can. (scramble, scramble…now how exactly does one make one of these?) When I asked her if she knew what dream catchers are for, she replied, “If you have bad dreams you have to spit them out of your mouth and into the dream catcher.” Well, not exactly, but gosh I’m going to miss these early years! If you want to know the real story behind dream catchers, read this.

What we used

  • thin wire
  • flexible piece of branch
  • embroidery thread
  • pom-pom

Twist branch into circular shape and secure it together. Our branch was a little bit short, so we ended up making more of a raindrop shape.

Secure thread with a big knot to the top of the twig and then start wrapping it. I imagined more of a natural color scheme, but my daughter wanted to use red wire and red yarn. Fair enough…it’s her dream catcher after all.

For a good tutorial on how and where to make these knots, read these instructions.

Many dream catchers are embellished with a feather, but N had her heart set on a pom-pom. A shiny pom-pom, actually.

We hung it above her bed with the hope that the pesky dreams might get tangled up in the yarn, while the good dreams could easily pass through the holes. Based on our experiences thus far there might be better ways to handle bad dreams, but it sure is nice to have a little bit of security dangling above us in those fragile moments.

Other ideas

left to right

1) Step-by-step tutorial on making a dream catcher from Hands on Crafts for Kids

2) Dream catchers made from Yogurt Lids from That Artist Woman

3) Make a simple dream catcher from a paper plate from 4 Crazy Kings

4) Whimsical Dream Catcher featured in Cookie Magazine from Nest Pretty Things on Etsy

How do you help your child/ren work through bad dreams?