Give the Gift of Art

cooks in the kitchen curated by tinkerlab from art.com

Do you do your holiday shopping online or offline?

I love shopping in little boutiques and arts and crafts fairs, but life with little ones means that I’m generally happiest shopping in my PJ’s, away from the crowds, while dropping items in the virtual shopping carts of some of my favorite online shops.

My Art.com Gift Guide

Have you ever given or received the gift of art? Just last week I opened my mailbox to find a surprise care package of art from my bestie in L.A. My heart fluttered and I hung it up right away. One of the best things about the gift of art is that it can come straight from the heart.

Maybe you’d love to give art as a gift, but you don’t know where to shop, or maybe you’re like me and you don’t have endless hours to putter around artist studios. To help you out, I put together seven Art.com Gift Guides as a bit of inspiration. If you see something here that you like, click over to my Gift Guide Galleries, place your order, and your art will arrive in time for the holidays. You could also visit Art.com and browse their ginormous selection of prints. I own a few pieces from Art.com and can vouch for the fast shipping and high quality of the prints and frames.

Bonus: Get 20% off if you place an order now through November 29, 2012 with the code: NJWQ87

Happy Go Lightly

for some extra whimsy and playfulness

happy go lightly curated by tinkerlab from art.com

Cooks in the Kitchen

for chefs and people who love to spend time in the kitchen.

cooks in the kitchen curated by tinkerlab from art.com

Oh so modern

for the streamlined, geometric home. That might be an Eichler.

oh so modern curated by tinkerlab from art.com

Wee Little Ones

for the nursery or new babies.

wee little ones collage curated by tinkerlab from art.com

For the Girls

for girly girls and tough girls — they’ve got you covered.

for the girls curated by tinkerlab from art.com

For the Boys

is for car lovers, robot, and pirates.

for the boys curated by tinkerlab from art.com

Film Buff

for the popcorn-eating, Academy Awards-watching connoisseur.

film buff collage curated by tinkerlab from art.com

This post is sponsored by Art.com.

 

Snowflake Collage Activity for Kids

snowflake collage activity for kids

Are you looking for a meaningful process-oriented art project to do with the kids this winter? I have an answer for you with this snowflake collage activity for kids.

snowflake collage activity for kids

Have you made snowflakes with your child? Once you get started, making snowflakes can be completely addicting. Last year, when my older daughter was three, we made PILES of snowflakes and this year she turned into a snowflake-making machine about a week before Thanksgiving. The good news for us Californians is that we’ll be knee-deep in snow by December at this rate!

Snowflake Collage Activity for Kids

snowflake activity for kids

Step 1: Cut Snowflakes

There are lots of ways to make paper snowflakes, and my favorite tutorial for easy, good looking snowflakes can be found by Maya over at Maya Made.  This also happens to be a favorite blog of mine, and you’ll probably enjoy getting lost in the images of her gorgeous farmhouse and handmade loveliness.

We used a pack of precut tissue circles like these from Discount School Supply, but any tissue paper or other thin paper will work equally well.

snowflake activity for kids

Step 2: Lay them out over a sheet of card stock

4-year old N set hers out on top of two sheets of card stock that she taped together.

snowflake collage activity for kids

Step 3: Get your Mod Podge and Palette Knife ready

I spread a thin layer of Mod Podge onto the paper to which N deftly attached each snowflake. She was in charge of the layout, which included some beautiful layering of colors. After she placed the snowflake, I added a little more Mod Podge to seal it in place.

Watered down white glue will also work if you don’t have Mod Podge, but I’d encourage you to invest in some because it works so well for all sorts of collage activities.

Snowflake Collage Activity for Kids

Step 4: Keep making snowflakes until you’re done

Snowflake collage activity for kids

Step 5: If your dad’s birthday is coming up, turn it into a gift :)

Or, proudly hang your masterpiece and welcome in the winter season.

It’s all about the process

Like all the projects on this site, I hope  you’ll take this inspiration and run with it in your own direction. Or better yet, your child will take it in his or her own direction. Happy exploring!

You might also enjoy

Rolled Paper Snowflakes

Hanging Holiday Stars

Last-minute DIY activities to make with the kids

 

3 Tools that Build a Child’s Confidence

3 tools

Young children are full of their own ideas, confidence, and enthusiasm for the new. As much as we hope they’ll retain this strong sense of self, as they get older it’s possible that their confidence can diminish with the influence of peers or self-doubt that comes from not being able to bounce back from failure.

I hope that my kids can retain a strong sense of self as they grow older. Given that my kiddos are girls I’m acutely aware of how easily they can lose themselves in the face of strong personalities. The rise of books such as Raising Confident Girls: 100 Tips For Parents And Teachers, The A to Z Guide to Raising Happy, Confident Kids, and how girls THRIVE demonstrate just how critical this issue is for children, and perhaps girls morso than boys.

I wrote a post about Six Tools for Building a Child’s Confidence and share three more with you today not as doctrine but as inspiration. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this — what tools do you think are important for building a child’s confidence?

Tool #1: Trust.

Children put an enormous amount of stock into what their parents or teachers think, and it’s our role to show them that we believe in them.

My 4-year old loves, loves, loves my sewing machine. I don’t let her use it unsupervised, but when she does use the machine all I do is help her guide the fabric. She presses the pedal, lifts the foot, and cuts the thread. The same can be said for the hot glue gun, electric mixer and cooking at the stove. We don’t do these things all the time, but I try to find ways to build these moments of trust into our days together.

Tool #2: Iteration

For a child to truly understand how things work, he or she needs to test it out multiple times and in various ways. Think of the child who just learned to write his name and how he’ll write it in various sizes, on different kinds of paper, vertically and horizontally, all in an effort to understand the written word and his particular place in the world.

In this image taken of my daughter last year, she was painting with watercolors. She paints with watercolors frequently and had experimented with brush painting, dipping paper in the paint, and squeezing paint with droppers. On this day, she wanted to see test the results of blowing paint with two different straws. One worked far better than the other, and she only figured this out because we dedicated time to iteration.

Tool #3: Tinker

Pulling things apart to undertand how they work helps children grasp the bigger picture of the world around them. We had an old monitor that was scheduled for a trip to the dump, and decided to pull it apart (carefully) so that my daughter could get a close look at some circuit boards and wires that live behind the computer. Another, safer, way to go about this is to give children some small tools and an old clock, and a fair amount of time to take it all apart.

For more on this topic, check out Six Tools for Building a Child’s Confidence

What tools do you think are important for building a child’s sense of confidence?

Tape Art

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We are a tape-loving house. You?

Tape art with colorful tape, clear tape, paper tape: young children will enjoy using tape in this process-based design activity that encourages fine motor skills, compositional choices, creative thinking, and more.

tape art

Have you seen this colorful paper tape at Target? It’s from the Kid Made Modern line and you can find it in the art supply section. I’m not an affiliate — just a happy customer.

It’s not washi tape, in case you’re wondering. Washi tape is traditionally made from rice paper and has a transparent quality to it. This tape is fairly heavy; I think you can tell from this photo that it’s got some body to it, which makes it easy for little hands to manipulate.

The tape comes on a long cardboard roll, so I fashioned a make-shift tape dispenser from PVC pipe and connectors that came with our Fort Magic kit and it works like a charm at keeping it organized on the table.

tape art

After watching my children use this fancy tape for a couple months I’ve come to see it as the love child of stickers and wrapping paper. It’s useful for adhering one thing to another, but my kids mostly use it as a form of decoration.

On this particular day I cleared our art table, cut brown paper bags into 6″ wide strips, and presented my kiddos with paper tape and brown paper bags. They loved it.

tape art

My 4-year old likes to cut her own pieces of tape and focused closely on building coordinated horizontal lines across the paper.

Oh, that and covering her fingers with tape.

tape art

My 2-year old is barely getting the hang of cutting (we practice a lot, and I recommend cutting playdough if it’s something you’re working on too), so I pre-cut lots of pieces for her to tape at will. She spent the whole time piling one piece of tape on top of another.

Remember, it’s the process, people, not the product!

tape art

I also pulled out our office supply store dot and garage sale-style stickers, which 2-year old R added to her tape pile.

tape art

This is my 2-year old’s completed piece, which is wildly different from my 4-year old’s interpretation of the materials…

tape art

So, what’s your design material du jour?

Since this colorful tape bonanza, we’ve moved on to clear Scotch tape, a new stash of stickers, mylar, and alphabet stencils.

More tape art inspiration from Tinker-past…

Art Games: Draw with Art Dice

art games

I’m always happy to land on fun art games that entertain my children and help their brains develop. I originally blogged about these handmade art dice last Spring, and thought you might like to see how this popular tool is getting used by 2-year old daughter #2.

Art games

I started with a set of blank wooden blocks. If you don’t have wood blocks, you could make your own by folding paper into a cube shape. I’ll include a link to a template that you can print at the end of this post.

art games

My toddler gathered a set of art dice, markers, and a sheet of paper, and then decided to cozy up in my bed with one of those funny lap pillow-tables. I didn’t tell her what to do, so I can only assume that she’s seen her sister use these dice before when she turned the die to orange, selected an orange marker, and then proceeded to make an orange circle.

One of the dice is covered with a variety of lines, and we practiced making long lines, short lines, wavy lines, and zig-zag lines.

And then she returned to work on color.

art games

The part that I enjoyed the most was watching her engage in this self-directed activity for close to twenty minutes. Every now and then she’d invite me to draw with her or ask me the name of a color, but for the most part little R was engaged with making connections between the images on the dice and what came out of her pen.

I first did this with my older daughter when she was two, and at four, we still use these every now and then. I use them too as a way to jog my imagination when I’m in a drawing rut. And my 4-year old and I will use them together to make collaborative drawings. Check out the original Art Dice article for more game ideas.

If you make your own art dice (they make great gifts!) and give ‘em a spin, I’d love to hear about how it goes for you. Here are a few inspiring links from a couple of my readers…

Art Games: More Art Dice Inspiration

I love seeing how Barbara used art dice to teacher her 2nd graders about line and primary colors.

In this post, Heather, Vice President of the University of Victoria Art Education Student Association created paper templates that you can simply print, cut, and glue. Easy peasy. Thanks Heather!! Color, Line, Shape 

Jean at the Artful Parent is also a fan of art games. Here are a few of my favorites from her site:

Homemade Gifts: Kiwi Crate for the Holidays {Giveaway}

kiwi crate stamp

We love homemade gifts, so when Kiwi Crate recently asked me if my 4-year old would like to try one of the newest Holiday crates from their Celebration Shop, guess what I said? Yes please!

We’re giving away three of these Holiday Crates, and you’ll have a chance to win one at the end of this post!

homemade gifts from Kiwi Crate

They sent us a crate called Gifts Made by Me, and given the quality of this crate, I’m sure that the other two holiday crates, Crafty Christmas and Handmade Hanukkah, are just as fabulous.

As you probably know, I’m a DIY gal and rarely gravitate to pre-packaged activities. But here’s the difference with Kiwi Crate: although the package everything up for the busy parent, they don’t skimp on the quality of the materials and the projects in this crate value the process as much as the product.

But this isn’t just my opinion…my 4-year old worked on these gifts for three days and kept talking about them. We work on a lot of homemade projects in our home, and her engagement with this crate speaks volumes of the how thoughtfully these materials were assembled.

homemade gifts: kiwi crate for the holidays

When the package arrived, N was itching to rip it open. I had a plan in my mind that we’d save it for later in the week, but I had a hard time curbing her enthusiasm. I told her that we could open the crate, look it over, and then save it for the next day. That sort of backfired because opening the crate only got her more excited.

She quickly assessed that the crate contained materials for making homemade gifts (two high quality notebooks that she would make prints for, plus all the wrapping materials we’d need)– which she already decided were destined for her grandparents, and we were off to the races.

Homemade Gifts: Kiwi Crate for the holidays

The first thing we did was set up a mini-printing studio, and Kiwi Crate sent all the materials to make this successful and mitigate the mess.

I appreciated this because printmaking, when done right (with real printing inks, as included in the crate), can be a huge mess. Instead, it was all contained on the craft paper, cotton swabs, brayer, and thin sheet of plastic that we taped to the paper. It was a clever set-up that I’ll be sure to replicate next time we pull out the ink and brayers.

homemade gifts: kiwi crate for the holidays

The crate also came with a really nice brayer (the tool you see back there that rolls the ink onto the plate), which I’m excited to add to our brayer collection.

I only had a couple issues with the crate, but they’re not deal-breakers. The ink took a few days to dry, which I’d attest to the summery weather we’ve been having. And the snowflake stickers that we used to make our own stamps didn’t hold their shape too well. But my 4-year old didn’t mind one bit, and the smudginess of our snowflakes added to the homemade charm of her gifts.

When she was done, she created two notebooks, two cards, and hand-printed ribbon. Gorgeous!

The best part? It’s only the beginning of November and my 4-year old already made her grandparents their holiday gifts: homemade notebooks that she’s proud of.

homemade gifts from Kiwi Crate

More Information About Homemade Gifts from Kiwi Crate

Sign up for the Kiwi Crate Newsletter

Buy a Gift Subscription for friends, cousins, and kids

Check out the Holiday Crates in the Celebration Shop

Free shipping on orders of $100 or more with the code WINTER

Enter the Giveaway

Kiwi Crate is giving away 3 Crates like the one I reviewed: Gifts Made By Me. Prizes can only be shipped to U.S. mailing addresses. The contest will close on November 18, 2012 at 11:59 EST. a Rafflecopter giveaway

I’m an advisor to Kiwi Crate and they sent me a free crate to review, but all opinions in this review are my own. This post may also contain affiliate links.

Tinkersketch Art Ideas

tinkersketch art ideas

Tinkersketch Art Ideas :: Tinkerlab.com

Are you a creative parent or teacher who’s looking for some art ideas?

Do you know about the ongoing #Tinkersketch art journal challenge that’s brewing over on Instagram? Every day, people just like you and me show up to snap and share photos of their sketchbook art ideas. 

The idea behind this challenge is to make a little bit of room in our busy parenting lives to create via glueing, painting, collaging, and experimenting in a sketchbook everyday, or as often as we can.

When I first introduced this challenge I had a lot more time on my hands (check back tomorrow for an announcement about where my time went!), and I made time to create a tinkersketch every day. I now experiment in my sketchbook when I can, usually alongside my children when we’re all at the art table, and I never regret the time I spend doing this. I share this to say that if you feel strapped for time, create something when you have the time and your efforts will not go unnoticed by you or your child.

Tinkersketch Art Ideas: Highlights from Instagram

There’s a lovely crew of dedicated tinkersketchers who continue to inspire me and each other with their quick sketches, material explorations, and collaborative art journaling with kids. Chelsey, one of my Tinkersketch buddies, wrote this inspiring post about her Tinkersketch journey. She says in the post, “I thought hard about doing it, but was really nervous. I don’t think I’ve ever even owned a sketchbook in my life. I am NOT an artist and do not feel creative in any way.” And then she tackled the project with so much gusto that I’ve considered asking her to take it over!

Here’s a peek at a few of my favorite images from this month…

art ideas

Altered book image@emog

“Ella cus” (She sews) is a beautiful and delicate song from #laiaia@angaleta who blogs at Encenentlaimaginacio 

art ideas

Sometimes the tinkersketch moves off the page like this Pumpkin Painting, @supershortcake,

Nutmeg, Curry, and Paprika painting, @angaleta who blogs at Encenentlaimaginacio 

art ideas

Painting with Chocolate, @angaleta who blogs at Encenentlaimaginacio 

Child’s Tinkersketch, @aneverydaystory (Kate) who blogs at An Everyday Story

art ideas

Child’s Tinkersketch: “Lucy is inside a robot and controlling it on the left. On the right is Lucy and theo. theo is sad because he wants to be in the robot., @cmarashian who blogs at Buggy and Buddy.

Mixed Media Weaving, @emog

THIS WEEK’S TINKERSKETCH PROMPTS

When I first shared this challenge I posted prompts, and it’s been a while since I’ve picked up on this. Will you tell me if this is useful?

Feel free to use the art prompts if they work for you or ignore them completely and forge your own sketchbook path. Sketches can happen in a traditional sketchbook or on just about anywhere you can dream up. Remember, this past week @Supershortcake made her tinkersketch on a pumpkin, so go on and think outside the box. The objective is to make a little time to experiment with new art ideas in a supportive environment.

  • Fill the page with Jack-O-Lanterns
  • Draw with a hot glue gun
  • Combine skinny strips of tape and leaves in a collage
  • Make (and use) paper stencils like these
  • Paint an abstract picture of the colors of the weather
  • Write a poem about the place you live, and illustrate it
  • Document a song that you can’t get out of your head

How to SHARE your tinkersketch

  • Instagram: Upload a photo of your DPS with the hashtag #tinkersketch. My username is tinkerlab, in case you’d like to follow me
  • Facebook: Upload a photo of your DPS directly to the Tinkerlab Facebook page
  • Google+: Upload your DPS photo to your own page. Tag me @rachelle doorley  and/or @tinkerlab. Add the hashtag #tinkersketch
  • Twitter: Add the hashtag #tinkersketch
  • If you’re a Blogger, write a post about your tinkersketch adventures and share it with me! Feel free to snag the button up there if you’d like.

If you want to read more about the Tinkersketch project hop over here for the introduction and more info on how you can join.

Follow us on Facebook for more kids’ activities and ideas, and sign up for our newsletter.

Looking at Art with Kids: Norman Rockwell

How to look at art with kids :: Tinkerlab.com
Have you spent any time looking at art — in a MUSEUM — with your child? Even though I’m an arts educator who spent years leading gallery tours and training docents, we don’t spend as much time in art museums as I’d like because, you know, my children look at everything as a potential playground. I have an arsenal of gallery games and tricks up my sleeve, but they’re no match for a 2-year old!

This isn’t to say that we don’t look at art. We look at art at home, and sculpture gardens are a preschool parent’s best friend. But given my love for visiting art museums, I’ve had to seriously adjust my expectations of how a visit feels.

In a word. Short.

This summer we had the pleasure of visiting Cape Cod’s Heritage Museums and Gardens in Sandwich, MA. If you ever find yourself in the area with little and big people, it’s a multi-generational gold mine. A few highlights were Hidden Hollow (an outdoor classroom and fun zone), the indoor carousel, and gorgeous gardens and grounds. What we didn’t expect to see was a traveling Norman Rockwell exhibit, Norman Rockwell Beyond the Easel.

My mother-in-law wanted to see the show, and while I did too, all I could imagine was the push-pull of my two- and four-year-olds to skedaddle in the wake of weary art patrons and Rockwell’s photorealistic paintings.

But the interpretive team did a great job bringing Rockwell’s work to my kids’ level. We snapped lots of photos in the Model T, put on old-fashioned clothes that matched the style of Rockwell’s models, and assembled a magnetic version of Rockwell’s famous painting, The Runaway (1958).

Do you know The Runaway? It turns out that Norman Rockwell’s narrative work provides a rich platform for children to search for meaning, and my my 4-year old loved it!

We were all fascinated by the side-by-side comparison of the final painting with intermediate sketches and the black-and-white photograph that Rockwell staged as inspiration. We did a lot of tennis-match looking to spot the similarities and differences, which made me appreciate Rockwell’s eye for details and storytelling even more than I had before.

Try it for yourself…it’s super fun.

Print the two images, and then look at them carefully with your favorite little person, an experience that fosters creative thinking and curiosity. Beyond making comparisons, you can try asking a couple inquiry-based questions (based on Visual Thinking Strategies) that will get the conversation flowing:

  1. What’s going on in this picture?
  2. What do you see that makes you say that? (ask this question if your child offers a subjective answer such as “The boy likes the Police Officer.”)
After that, if you want more information about The Runaway and the photo that it was based on, click over here.

If you find yourself falling in love with this image or you want to see more works by Rockwell or other beloved American artists, you might enjoy visiting Art.com’s Americana gallery or go directly to The Runaway on Art.com. I own a few pieces by Art.com, and the quality is beyond belief. I almost feel like I’m looking at the original piece.

They also do an incredible job framing their work, which was the first thing I noticed when I opened the carefully wrapped print that arrived on my doorstep. You can see what I mean in this craftsmanship video, which shows how Art.com‘s frames are handcrafted in America.

You can also find Art.com on Pinterest, where they pin cool art and, ahem, I hear there’s a BIG giveaway happening soon for their Pinterest followers.

What was the last museum you went to? Any tips on visiting art museums with kids?

This post is sponsored by Art.com, but all opinions are my own.

Fall Luminary: Make a Lantern

Crayon Shavings :: from Tinkerlab, Creative Experiments for Kids

Today I’m joined by Arts Educator extraordinaire, Amanda Gross, who’s back to show us how to make a Fall Luminary from leaves and melted crayons. Not only are these beautiful, but the processes of collecting leaves, peeling crayons, and melting the wax with an iron are sure to capture a child’s attention.

Make a Lantern!

Luminaries are perfect for brightening a crisp autumn evening, and a crafty way to explore this season when leaves turn brilliant colors, the rosy twilight falls more quickly, and families the world over traditionally give thanks for the harvest.

You might start by reading a book that poetically investigates the unique things of autumn, such as Lois Ehlert’s Leaf Man or Lauren Thompson’s Mouse’s First Fall.

Would your child like to make a colorful fall luminary, choosing materials from outside and around the house?

Step 1:
Wander around outside, and notice how the leaves have turned a multitude of colors and have gotten crunchy. Choose leaves that have fallen off of trees, but are not too dry and can still lay flat.  If leaves are very curly, you may consider pressing them in a heavy book for a few days, before using them.  Bring your collection inside and onto a table.

Step 2:
Find a clean mason jar that will serve as the structure for your luminary.  Measure the mason jar’s circumference with sting, and cut a wax paper strip that is long enough to fit around it. 

Step 3:
Gather crayons of your favorite colors.   Lanterns for the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival are often inspired by butterflies, so any hue goes!   Unwrap the paper covering the crayons, and shave them lengthwise over the wax paper, with a serrated knife or vegetable peeler.  If your child isn’t old enough to wield the knife, s/he could choose the crayon, the location, and how much pigment they’d like you to shave off.

Step 4:
Place leaves over the crayon shavings, and feel free to add more shavings on top.  Explain that the crayon wax will melt, and those little crumbs will become puddles of color.  Experiment with composition, and with layering the leaves and shavings.

Step 5:
Set up your ironing board and turn on the iron (If you are like me, and not the most experienced with this, here’s one of many online ironing tutorials).  On your ironing board, place a flat, thin cloth (the crayon wax will probably bleed through the wax paper a bit, so use scrap fabric and not “good” cloth), then carefully place your wax paper with the leaves and shavings.  Over this, put a blank sheet of wax paper, of around the same size.  Layer on another thin cloth, and smooth out the wrinkles with your fingers.  Spritz the top layer evenly with water from a spray bottle, and now you’re ready to iron.  Flatten out the wrinkles and iron both sides of the wax paper “sandwich.”

Step 6:
After waiting a few minutes for the wax paper to cool, peel away the cloth.  Measure your mason jar again, and cut the wax paper so that it fits around the jar, then tape or tie a ribbon around it to hold the paper in place.

Step 7:
When it gets dark outside, drop a candle into your mason jar, and ignite it with a long lighter.  The brilliant, glowing colors and winding lines of the leaves will surely be a cozy centerpiece for your family to gather around, and is an excellent reminder to be grateful for the season.

Resources

Picture Books About Fall on Goodreads

PreservingLeaves and a Leaf Lantern

Nature’sStained Glass

MeltedCrayon Luminaries

Amanda E. Gross_headshotAmanda designs curricula to guide and inspire children, teens, and adults to appreciate art and to create!  She earned a Master’s of Arts in Teaching from The Rhode Island School of Design and is an instructor at Academy of Art University.  Amanda is also an illustrator, painter, DIY crafter, and permaculture enthusiast. Find out more about Amanda here: Art Curricula WebsiteArt Portfolio WebsiteLinkedIn, and Pinterest.

DIY Paper Pyramid Lanterns

make a paper lantern

I have such a heavy heart today, friends, because we lost one of the good ones in this world. My dear friend, Steve, who happens to be one of the funniest, wisest, and most generous people I know lost his long battle with cancer.

I wasn’t planning to post anything today, but the glow of these paper lanterns made me think about Steve’s shining light, and I thought I’d dedicate this post to him and his incredible wife, Jen.

Grab a few battery-operated tea lights, a favorite paper (in this case security envelopes!), scissors, and tape, and you're ready to make these simple DIY lanterns to illuminate a dark winter night.

These were inspired by the Paper Lanterns from Willowday, and if you change up the paper patterns (or maybe make your own), these could become party decorations, Halloween luminaries, or bedroom night lights.

If you you happen to make these lanterns (and why wouldn’t you — they’re rad!), I like to think that the glow might remind you that we’re each filled with enough light to brighten a friend’s darkest hour. Go on — spread some joy today. Life is truly short and we each have the capacity to touch the lives of others.

So let’s get started. Here’s what you’ll need…

How to Make Paper Lanterns

  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Hole Puncher
  • Clear Tape
  • Ruler
  • Battery-operated votive candle
Because I drew my triangle free-hand, and you shouldn’t have to go through all that trial and error, here’s an equilateral triangle for your printing delight:
equilateral triangle
If you know me, you know that I like to get my kids involved in hands-on learning, and this is a good way to teach children how to carefully outline shapes, which in turn teaches patience and accuracy.

make a paper lantern

Step 1: Draw an equilateral triangle (or scale and print it) and cut it out.

Make paper lantern

Step 2: Trace it onto a sheet of paper FOUR times.

We drew ours onto a security envelope because we like to upcycle around here. And I’m super crazy about the patterns on these.

how to make paper lanterns

Step 3: Cut the whole shape out.

Step 4: Tape it together and punch holes into the sides if you’d like.

Step 5: Add a battery-powered tea light (not a real candle, please, safety first) and decorate like mad.

how to make paper lanterns

I love you, Steve and Jen. You’ll always be in my thoughts.

If you like what you see here, we’d love to have you join our 7000+ member community on Facebook.

DIY Pumpkin Pie Playdough

fall playdough

Have you ever made your own playdough? Store bought playdough is okay in a pinch, but making your own is a money saver and you can make TONS of it in mere minutes.

Easy! How to make your own pumpkin pie play dough with ingredients that you probably already have in the house.  It smells amazing!

Inspired by The Artful Parent’s Autumn Arts and Crafts book, The Artful Year: Autumn, we finally pitched our peppermint playdough in favor of a more seasonal scent: Pumpkin Pie!

Pumpkin Pie Playdough Recipe…

I used our favorite play dough recipe, which also happens to be the favorite of my daughter’s awesome preschool class, so I’m not going to get experimental with the dough itself, but we did experiment with the spice combination.

The dough itself takes about 20 minutes to prepare, it cooks on the stove-top, and the most complicated-to-find ingredient it calls for is cream of tartar. If it’s hard for you to find, you can get Cream of Tartar on Amazon.

Yes, you can find 2-minute dough recipes, and I’d encourage you to use them if you’re short on time, but the benefit of this recipe is that it will last for ages. Ages. Scroll down for a PRINTABLE recipe card.

playdough

After we made the dough, I placed it on the counter to cool. Meanwhile, my 2-year old worked away at pinching out a real pie crust.

playdough

When the dough was cool to touch, we squeezed orange liquid watercolors on half of it and then kneaded it in. For this step, be sure to mix on a surface that won’t absorb the watercolors. My 4-year old wanted to make half the dough orange and half of it white.

playdough

Although we had planned to use a jar of pumpkin pie spice in the dough, my 4-year old was curious about using whole spices that we just bought, so we pulled out the coffee grinder and gave it a very loud whirl. Fun! I don’t have a proper nutmeg grinder, but this seemed to do the trick. And the smell of cardamom — I absolutely love it.

We experimented with the spice blend by adding the different spices, first quite cautiously and then rather liberally, and in different combinations. I learned that my 4-year old isn’t too crazy about the smell of cardamom, but loves cinnamon.

5.0 from 5 reviews
DIY Pumpkin Pie Playdough
Author: 
Prep time: 
Making time: 
Total time: 
 
Playdough is a wonderful material for building fine motor skills, developing imaginations through exploratory play, and supporting early engineering and building skills. This recipe rivals anything store-bought.
Ingredients
  • 5 cups water
  • 2½ cups salt
  • 3 tbsp. cream of tartar
  • 10 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 5 cups flour
  • Food coloring or liquid watercolors
  • Pumpkin Pie Spice, or a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, and cardamom
Instructions
  1. Mix everything but the food coloring together in a large pot until somewhat smooth. It will be lumpy. Not to worry, the dough will get smoother as it cooks.
  2. Cook the dough over a low heat. Mix frequently. The water will slowly cook out of the mixture and you’ll notice it starts to take on a sticky dough appearance.
  3. Keep mixing until the edges of the dough along the side and bottom of the pan appear dry. Pinch a piece of dough. If it’s not gooey, the dough is ready.
  4. Place the dough on a counter top or large cutting board or cooking tray that can withstand a little food coloring.
  5. Knead the warm dough until it’s smooth and then divide it into the number of colors that you’d like to make. We divided our in half: one orange and the other white.
  6. Flatten the ball, add a little bit of food coloring, and knead it in. Add more food coloring to get the desired shade.
  7. Store the dough in a large Ziplock bag or sealed container. Unused, it’ll keep for months.

playdough

My 2-year old was very happy, however, to shake-shake-shake the pie spices all over her gigantic mound of dough. Can you imagine how yummy our kitchen smelled?

playdough

After all this cooking, it was time to bake! At this point, our orange and white/tan doughs marbled into something lovely, and we got busy making small cakes and setting them out to eat on a 3-tier plate server.

Playdough Recipes

Rainbow Play Dough, Tinkerlab

No-cook Cinnamon Playdough, The Imagination Tree

39 Ways to Play with Playdough, The Artful Parent

Downloadable (Free) Playdough Recipe Book, Nurture Store

Fall Activities

Fall Bucket List, Tinkerlab

40 Autumn Activities for Kids, The Imagination Tree

Make Fall Sunprints, Tinkerlab

Multi-color Leaf Prints, Kleas

Negative Leaf Impressions, Tinkerlab

 

Happy Fall!

Styrofoam Printmaking

printing kids foam easy

easy crafts printmaking kids

This project uses materials that you probably already have at home, or can easily find in your drug store. The only specialty item is a brayer, but without it you’d never expose your kids to the experience of true printmaking.

Printing from styrofoam plates can help children learn that they can upcycle everyday materials into beautiful objects and teaches them patience and planning as they work through multiple steps to reach a desired outcome.

What is a Brayer?

A brayer is a tool, similar to a paint roller, that allows you to apply ink evenly to a large area. You can find brayers in art stores or order them online. I have a few different brayers, and I don’t think you need to go for the most expensive version. This Speedball Deluxe 4-Inch Hard Rubber Brayer is a really good brayer that will do everything you need.

Oh, and we used Colorations Washable Tempera Paint for this project, but I’m also a fan of using Speedball Watersoluble Block Printing Ink for a clearer image.

If brayers seem like an item that you’ll only use once or twice, you’ll be surprised at how addictive printmaking can be and you may find that your kids will make excuses to experiment with them. My own kids (ages 2 and 4) are always eager to tinker with our brayers.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Styrofoam Printmaking
Author: 
Recipe type: Printmaking
Prep time: 
Total time: 
 
Printing from styrofoam plates helps children learn that they can upcycle everyday materials into beautiful objects and teaches them patience and planning as they work through multiple steps to reach an outcome.
Ingredients
  • Styrofoam plate
  • Scissors
  • Copy Paper
  • Pencil
  • Paper tape, like masking tape
  • Tempera or Poster Paint
  • Cookie Sheet or Piece of Acrylic
  • Brayer
  • Paper or tablecloth to cover workspace
Instructions
  1. Cut the rim off the styrofoam plate.
  2. Place the stryrofoam circle on top of a sheet of tracing paper, and trace around the circle.
  3. Remove the plate.
  4. Draw a picture or design on the copy paper. Avoid drawing small details that will disappear when printed.
  5. Tape the drawing on top of the plate.
  6. Retrace your drawing, pushing hard enough to press into and make a mark on the plate.
  7. Remove the paper.
  8. Retrace the drawing on the styrofoam plate, creating deep grooves in the plate.
  9. Roll a small amount of paint onto the cookie sheet or piece of acrylic, and then roll the paint over the styrofoam plate.
  10. Cover the plate with a piece of copy paper, and press it down firmly with your whole hand.
  11. Remove the paper to reveal the printed magic.
  12. Repeat as desired.

easy styrofoam prints with kids

My 4-year old saw the circular shape of the plate and took it as an opportunity to make a spider web. She’s also sort of obsessed with Halloween, so spiders it was! When drawing the designs, encourage your child to avoid tiny details, as they won’t show up well in this printing process.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, my 2-year old got in on the action too. I gave her a pencil to draw directly onto the plate, and then she happily rolled paint with it. The printing part wasn’t that interesting to her, but the process of rolling was tops.

Clean-up

We stored our finished prints on another table. I recycled all the messy scrap paper, sprayed the table down, and dropped the brayers and sheet of acrylic into the sink. Done!

More printmaking inspiration

Abstract Recycled Packaging Prints with Printmaking Ink

Sink Mat Prints 

Cookie Sheet Monoprints

Bubble Wrap Prints

Sweet Potato Heart Prints

Styrofoam Pattern Prints