The No-Sew T-Shirt Scarf

I’m a sucker for repurposed objects, and have been wanting to make a no-sew t-shirt scarf for a while now. However, because we’ve been really good at purging our closets of unwanted items, I had not one old t-shirt to forage and upcycle into a DIY tshirt scarf.

Sigh.

This easy, no-sew t-shirt scarf comes together in a matter of minutes, and only cost me about $2 to make. If you already have a t-shirt, consider it FREE!

So, last week my littlest and I headed to our local Goodwill, and walked out with five large t-shirts for about $2 each. Deal! I used approximately one shirt for the scarf shown in this tutorial, which makes this a really affordable craft. If you make some version of the braided scarf necklaces shown here, you can make about four per large men’s shirt (or more if you use multiple colors as we did).

Like just about everything I share, there are no fast rules, only experiments. Take this as inspiration and come up with your own unique scarf, necklace, headband, or wrist cuff. There are so many possibilities!

p.s. Inspiration for this post came from the wonderful world of Pinterest, and this post, specifically, from Ette Studios. It includes a great roundup of t-shirt scarves and is definitely worth a look!

This easy, no-sew t-shirt scarf comes together in a matter of minutes, and only cost me about $2 to make. If you already have a t-shirt, consider it FREE!

 

DIY T-shirt Scarf Steps

  1. Cut the bottom hem off of your t-shirt, and then cut the shirt into horizontal strips, approximately 1″ – 1 1/2″ wide. Go all the way up to the armpit of the shirt. These strips will be stretched, so don’t worry yourself with perfection. We were on vacation and I left my favorite sewing scissors behind, and my choppy strips worked just fine!
  2. Stretch your loops. Find a willing and enthusiastic partner to help you! You really can’t pull these too hard.
  3. Collect your loops together and pull them once more to make them all even in length.
  4. Double loop the loops 🙂

If you want, you could stop right here and have a perfectly cute loopy necklace scarf. If you want to add a decorative flourish of color, keep on going.

You’ll need one more t-shirt in a contrasting color.

This easy, no-sew t-shirt scarf comes together in a matter of minutes, and only cost me about $2 to make. If you already have a t-shirt, consider it FREE!

 

DIY T-Shirt Scarf – Binding

  1. Cut one loop of the bottom of a t-shirt
  2. Cut the loop open and secure it around your looped scarf with one tie. Be sure to have a tail on the short side of the binding that’s at least 5″ long. You’ll use this extra fabric to tie a knot in a minute.
  3. Start to wind the binging around the scarf. Be sure to wrap it over the hanging piece.
  4. When you have as much as you’d like, cut it off.
  5. Tie the ends together in a knot.
  6. Tuck the ends under the binding. You may need to loosen the end of the binding to make room for this extra fabric.

The results

As soon as this scarf was done, I put it on. It looked so cute! So much, in fact, that my 6-year old asked if she could have it…forever. I failed to get a picture of either of us wearing it, and then promptly moved on to make three more scarves with my kids. This was such a rewarding and fun project to do with my girls, and a great way to turn old clothes into something fresh and wearable.

Art Prompts | White Drawings on Black Paper

I’m not a fussy person and often like to keep things as simple as possible. What about you?

I’m happiest with an amazing recipe that comes together in under 30 minutes and I can’t really be bothered with a high maintenance haircut. So if you’re in my camp, you’ll especially appreciate today’s art prompt to use white paint markers on black paper.

Art Prompts: White Marker on Black Paper Creativity Booster for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Supplies

  • Black Paper. We used a large roll of kraft paper (see below), but you could also use smaller sheets of black paper, found in any art supply store.
  • White Paint Markers.

Supply Recommendations

This list contains affiliate links.

Pacon Kraft Paper.  This paper is amazing. It comes in an ultra-wide roll that will cover most tables. It’s not super heavy like a lot of brown Kraft paper, but thinner and semi-smooth. The roll is large and I know that we’ll get a lot of use out of it.

Permaopaque Fine Line Markers. These are the colorful markers that you’ll see in this post. They work right out of the box and the colors are vibrant.

Sharpie Paint Pen. This was my 4-year old’s favorite pen for the broad, sweeping lines you see in the pictures.

Mala White Pen from IKEA. I’m always curious about IKEA art supplies and had to try out this set that comes with a white pen. It was less opaque and vibrant than the other choices, but fun because the white color shows up seconds after drawing with it.

White Opaque Pens from Ranger. These work like a ballpoint pen and the ink doesn’t flow from them as evenly as it does from the other pens, above. Take a look at the little owls that my 4-year old made here, to see how they look.

White marker on black paper creativity prompt | TinkerLab.com

The Set-up

  1. Roll your paper out on the table. If you’re not using a large roll of black paper, place the paper in front of the child.
  2. Place white markers nearby and invite him or her to draw and make marks.

Easy, right?

Note: I can’t guarantee that this will work for you, but the suggestion to draw with white on black is enticing, and gets kids excited simply because it reverses the tradition of black on white.

Art Prompts: White Marker on Black Paper Creativity Prompt | TinkerLab.com

I also placed some colorful paint markers on the table, but she was 100% invested in the white-on-black drawing.

Art Prompts: White Marker on Black Paper Creativity Booster for Kids | TinkerLab.com

And finally, a little owl family emerged after she turned one of the flowers that I drew into an owl beak.

White marker on black paper creativity prompt | TinkerLab.com

While she didn’t use any of the colorful markers, I was sooooo curious to see how they worked and tested them out. They’re far more brilliant against the black paper than I expected, and I would wholly recommend them if you’re looking for a marker that will show up on dark paper.

Art Prompts | Paint markers on black paper creativity prompt | TinkerLab.com

More White and Black Art

White paint on black paper, The Artful Parent

Christmas “Chalkboard” Packaging This post is where I got the Kraft paper recommendation!, Going Home to Roost

Process Art: Experimenting with Black and White with Toddlers, Meri Cherry

Painting with Pom Poms + Black and White Paint, Fantastic Fun and Learning

Black Paper and Masking Tape, Irresistible Ideas for Play Based Learning

Printed Leaves on Black Paper, A Faithful Attempt

Opaque White Glue on Black Paper, with Chalk Pastel, Art in the Middle School

Join the TinkerLab Community

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TinkerLab Newsletter

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids

Fun Origami Kit for Kids

Do you have a child who enjoys origami? Not too long ago we made these fun and easy origami rabbits. If you haven’t tried it yet, this origami project is a fantastic starting point for beginners — my four-year old loved it!

Easy Origami Rabbit for Beginners | TinkerLab.com

When my friends at Tuttle Publishing, the premier publisher and seller of books rooted in Asian culture, language, and history, asked if we’d like to try out a few of their favorite products for young learners (and an origami kit was included), of course we said “yes!”.

Origami Kit from Tuttle | TinkerLab.com

We have thoroughly enjoyed everything they sent, and what rises to the top is this reasonably priced origami box kit, My First Origami Kit (affiliate). It comes with patterned paper, one of the best origami instruction books I’ve seen yet, and a selection of stickers for adding eyes, paws, and other details to the origami.

The stickers are what makes this kit really shine, and my kids loved this extra.

Origami Kit from Tuttle | TinkerLab.com

My four-year old dug in right away. While both of my kids (ages 4 and 6) needed extra help with some of the steps, they loved picking out the animals and objects to build (with my help) and especially enjoyed adding stickers to their creatures.

My First Origami Kit | TinkerLab.com

Over the course of a month, we have made just about everything in this kit! Penguins, bears, birds, boats, and more.

I also really like how the high quality origami paper corresponds with the projects. There’s brown fur-patterned paper to go with the bear, black and white paper to go with the penguin, and so on.

The kit comes with instructions for 20 projects and 60 pieces of paper, so you could essentially make three of each project, which makes this a good value for a family with more than one child. 

Origami Kit from Tuttle | TinkerLab.com

Origami Kit from Tuttle | TinkerLab.com

Easy Origami Tutorials

If you’re eager to dive in and try your hand at origami right away, these five tutorials are a good place to begin…

Easy Origami Rabbit, TinkerLab

Easy Origami Cat, EasyOrigami.me

Easy Origami Frog, Origami for Kids

Simple Origami Boat, Paper Shapes

Origami Cubes, Origami Mommy

Tuttle Publishing Offer!

Tuttle Publishing | TinkerLab

Tuttle has offered our readers a generous discount for all of their titles, as well as BIG giveaway, and it will all be announced in tomorrow’s newsletter!

The giveaway will be announced to our newsletter subscribers. To get this and other great offers, be sure to sign up for the newsletter today!

Tuttle Giveaway

The giveaway will include:

Origami Bugs Kit

One Minute Paper Airplanes

Origami Magic Kit

My First Origami Kit

Origami Dinosaurs Kit

How to Make a Simple Box Loom Weaving

Easy box loom weaving with kids | TinkerLab.com

My older daughter, age six, is obsessed with fiber arts, and has been engaged in all sorts of weaving activities lately. We have a book case full of inspiring crafting books, and she and her friend pulled Eco-friendly Crafting with Kids (affiliate) by Kate Liley off the shelf. After paging through it they landed on Box Loom Weaving, and wanted to give it a go.

The tutorial is very well articulated, and once we gathered all the materials (and there are only seven supplies…phew) we had no trouble tackling this easy and rewarding weaving project. I’ll share all the steps here. If you enjoy this project, do check out the book for more hands-on ideas like this. If you’re like me, you can’t have enough crafting, making, and tinkering books!

Supplies for Box Loom Weaving

  • Cardboard box without a top. We cut ours to be about 2 inches tall.
  • Something sharp to poke holes in the box, such as a seam ripper or fat needle.
  • Ruler
  • Yarn. If you like 100% cotton, I’m a big fan of this brand and here’s an organic option for you. (affiliate links)
  • Scissors
  • Darning Needle (affiliate) or other fat needle. In lieu of a needle, you could tape your yarn to the end of a popsicle stick.
  • 2 popsicle sticks (or chopstick, heavy piece of paper, cardboard, ruler, etc.)

Easy box loom weaving for kids | TinkerLab.com

  1. Start with a box.
  2. Poke about 10 holes across two edges of the box. The holes should be roughly 1/2 inch apart.
  3. Tie a knot at one end of a long piece of yarn (sorry, I don’t have an exact length – it depends on the size of your box) and run the yarn through the holes, from one side of the box to the other.
  4. When you reach the other side, make sure that the yarn is taught and tie another knot so that the yarn stays put. This vertical piece of yarn is called the warp, from the old Norse word varp meaning “the cast of the net.”

Easy box loom weaving for kids | TinkerLab.com

  1. Run a new piece of yarn through your needle and tie one end of the yarn to either the left or right bottom side of the warp. This new piece of thread will be called the weft, from the old English word wefen meaning “to weave.”  In the world of weaving, the needle would be called the shuttle.
  2. Run the yarn from one side of the warp to the other, going under and over the warp yarn.
  3. Straighten it all out. After weaving the yarn back and forth a few times, weave a popsicle stick below the weft. This will keep the yarn straight.
  4. Keep weaving!

Easy box loom weaving for kids | TinkerLab.com

  1. Place another popsicle stick at the other end of the weaving to straighten it out.
  2. To add another color, simply tie the yarn you’re done with to another color, or tie it to the warp and then tie a new color to the warp. Trim your yarn.
  3. Keep on weaving and adding more colors.

Easy box loom weaving for kids | TinkerLab.com

  1. When the weaving is done, make a know of the weft to the warp.
  2. Cut the ends of the weaving away from the box loom
  3. Tie two yarn together to make a knot. If you have five dangling warp yarns at each end, you should tie a total of five knots.
  4. Your weaving is done!

More Eco-Friendy Crafts

Check out Eco-friendly Crafting with Kids (affiliate) for this idea and more step-by-step projects for preschool kids and adults to create together with found, natural, and recycled materials.

Eco-friendly Crafting with Kids

More Fiber Arts

Even Toddlers Can Sew

Sewing Cards for Preschoolers

Machine Sewing with a Preschooler

Recycled Weaving Fence


 

Join the TinkerLab Community

If you enjoyed this post, you might like to sign up for the weekly TinkerLab newsletter. It’sfree and we often send exclusive content and opportunities that are only available to our subscribers.

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids

TinkerLab Newsletter

Easy box loom weaving for kids | TinkerLab.com

 

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids

Printmaking is one of my very favorite processes to explore with children. Seeing how a texture or pattern repeats itself is full of magic, and a delightful process to witness and experience with kids.

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Here are 16 super easy, and very fun printmaking projects that are sure to inspire children (of all ages) to experiment with printing.

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Dip nuts and bolts into paint and repeat these cool shapes all over paper: Picklebums

Another household tool to dip into paint is the potato masher: Play Based Learning

Blow a paint + soap mixture with a straw, and you have some gorgeous bubble printing: TinkerLab

Roll ink or paint over a piece of styrofoam from a meat or veggie tray: TinkerLab

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Press okra into a stamp pad for beautiful flower prints: The Imagination Tree

Draw onto a paint-covered muffin tin with ear swabs for this fun printmaking exploration: The Artful Parent

Make a stamp wheel with a tape roll and foam stamps: Inner Child Fun

Cover a rolling pin with bubble wrap for this squishy experiment: Handmade Kids Art

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Another take on bubble wrap printing: tape it to the end of a tube: Creative Connections for Kids

Make these amazing patterns with recycled container printing: Picklebums

Use a rubber sink mat with a pattern to make these cheerful printed cards: TinkerLab

So easy! Dip toys or blocks into paint for block printing: Kids Activities Blog Sink Mat Prints

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Make these cool shapes with bubble wands. Laughing Kids Learn

Corks make for easy to hold handles for these foam sticker-topped stampers: Happy Hooligans

Got Lego? There are so many shapes and sizes to play with: Filth Wizardry

Cut up rubber bands to make plates that can be printed: Kristen’s Blog Life

 

Join the TinkerLab Community

Get more ideas for raising young inventors and filling your life with creativity by signing up for the weekly TinkerLab newsletter. It’s free and we often send exclusive content and opportunities that are only available to our subscribers.

TinkerLab Newsletter

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids

16 Easy Printmaking Projects for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Makey Makey Piano – An Invention Kit for Everyone

Make + Key = Makey Makey

Would you enjoy playing a game of PacMan with carrots or tinkering with a set of play dough piano keys? If the answer is “yes,” then Makey Makey might be just the toy for you! Today I’ll show you how to make a Makey Makey Piano with bananas!

I’ve been following Makey Makey by JoyLabz for a while and we finally got the chance to play with our very own set.

Makey Makey Invention Kit for Everyone | TinkerLab.com review

What is Makey Makey?

That’s a great question — before we brought ours home I wasn’t entirely sure either!

Makey Makey is an easy-to-use invention kit that’s essentially a printed circuit board that connects to a computer via a USB cable. Wires connect Makey Makey to conductive objects (i.e. play dough, bananas, aluminum foil, coins), which can then be played much like a joystick or keyboard key.

Basically, Makey Makey takes over the functionality of the space bar and other computer keys, and the conductive objects become the computer’s new keys! Cool, right?

One more thing: Do you see my daughter holding one end of the black wire in the photo (above)? YOU close the circuit to the ground with your body by holding one end of an alligator clip while playing with Makey Makey with another hand.  If you let go of that wire, nothing works. This makes for a strong lesson in how circuits work. Awesome for kids!

What’s inside?

That tidy little green kit you see there is filled with a few important supplies:

  • Makey Makey board with 18 key-press connections and one ground connection
  • 7 alligator clips
  • 6 white wires
  • 1 USB cable
  • Basic instructions

Makey Makey Kit

How does Makey Makey work?

  1. It’s an Arduino Circuit Board. The heart of Makey Makey is its circuit board. The Makey Makey board connects to your computer via the USB cable (see the orange cord).
  2. Ground the Circuit. Connect one end of a wire to the board with the simple alligator clip technology. Hold the other end of the wire with your hand, and YOUR BODY now completes the circuit.
  3. Replace keyboard keys with conductive materials. Attach one end of an alligator clip to a spot on the Makey Makey board, and the other end to something conductive. We chose bananas.
  4. Play a game or an instrument | Make a Makey Makey Piano. Then you want to find a digital instrument or game to connect your Makey Makey to. We connected to a piano for our first project, but you could also hook up your new “game controller” to PacMan or Tetris. Here’s our banana piano in action:

Makey Makey Piano with Bananas

Makey Makey Experiments

This is where Makey Makey gets interesting. Once you get the hang of how Makey Makey works, you’ll certainly come up with new ways to tinker and create with it. The Makey Makey website has a pages of creations and games that people have invented around their product: talking water fountains, a heartbeat wall. And my favorite: the Giggling Circuit. You’ll want to try that one! Here’s a link.

And my all-time favorite: Eat the Star Spangled Banner. Oh-my-goodness. Amazing fun.

Makey Makey Banana Piano | TinkerLab.com

Makey Makey in Schools and Libraries

  • According to this Fast Company article, one in five Makey Makeys are used in Makerspaces for after-school and other educational programs
  • The Makey Makey website includes step-by-step tutorials that offer ideas for collaborations in school and other group settings.
  • The Tech Museum in San Jose invented a game for their Maker Space that invited teams of kids to work together to build human-size circuits with a chain of bodies. They look like they’re having so much fun!
  • Combine Makey Makey with Scratch coding (recommended for kids ages 8 and up), and you’ll get a child hooked on inventing and problem solving

What age is it for?

I couldn’t find an official age range on the product’s site. My kids are 4 and 6, and they loved playing with Makey Makey once I set it up. They quickly understood how to build a circuit with their bodies, and also enjoyed the task of testing various objects for conductivity. Depending on a child’s experience with electronics and computers, I would guess that young teens would be able to use Makey Makey on their own. Younger children will need adult assistance, but it’s just as interesting for adults as it is for kids, and makes a cool side-by-side learning experience.

Where to buy Makey Makey

Amazon (affiliate)

Directly from Makey Makey. If you’re a school, you can order with a P.O. from Makey Makey.


We had so much fun with Makey Makey, and look forward to testing it out in more ways.

Thanks to JoyLabz for sending us the Makey Makey kit to review. All opinions shared here are our own.

Halloween Crafts for Kids

Here comes Halloween! I scoured some of my favorite kid-friendly sites and found this awesome selection of Halloween Crafts for Kids. I think you’ll love them.

What does this Halloween Crafts for Kids roundup include?

  • Ghosts, pumpkins, spider webs, mummies, monsters, and skeletons.
  • Activities for toddlers, preschoolers, and school age kids.
  • Crafts that kids can actually do. Some with a little adult assistance.
  • Projects that use easy-to-find household materials such as spaghetti, cardboard rolls, candy, paint, string, jars, egg cartons, gauze, and cotton balls.
  • Sixteen projects to keep us busy for a while!

Halloween Crafts for Kids

Easy and Fun Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab

Let’s get started…

Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Even little kids can get in on the Halloween action with this festive Cotton Ball Ghost for Toddlers: No Time for Flash Cards

This Pumpkin Mummy Family is not messy to make and beyond cute: Hands on as we Grow

Build fine-motor skills with this simple Marshmallow Skull Craft: No Time for Flash Cards

I would have to give in to my kids’ begging to eat the candy corn while making this Candy Corn Monster but it would be worth it: Crafty Morning

Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab.com

These Marble + Paint Spider Webs are toddler-friendly. Making these is soooo addictive : TinkerLab

The tutorial for these Handmade Spider Sacks is wonderful! : Modern Parents Messy Kids

Cut up some circles and then invite your child to decorate for this Easy DIY Halloween Garland: TinkerLab

Add a little holiday glow to a dark patio or room with these Halloween Lantern Jars: Red Ted Art

Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Use cardboard rolls as the base for a Monster Mobiles, and let your child have fun decorating: Happy Hooligans

Got K-cups? Save them for a Recycled K-cup Recycled Lantern: Handmade Kids Art

These Glowing Pumpkin and Monster Jars are dipped in colored salt! What a cool texture: Fantastic Fun and Learning

Make a handprint spider and practice lacing in this Handprint Spider in a Spider Web: Mom Endeavors

Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab.com

Before making a Spaghetti Spider Web, build memories by inviting a child to play with slimy, green spaghetti: Hands on as we Grow

Fun! With the addition of a rubber band, make this Easy Halloween Craft Bouncy Spider: Kids Activities Blog

Invite your child to cover paper with masking tape, and then cut out a Masking Tape Mummy: No Time for Flash Cards

Save those egg cartons for this simple Egg Carton Bat: Crafty Morning

More Halloween Ideas

If you enjoyed this post, you have to check out 50 Simple Halloween Ideas for Kids.

Join the TinkerLab Community

And, you might enjoy signing up for the weekly TinkerLab newsletter. It’s free and we often send exclusive content and opportunities that are only available to our subscribers.

TinkerLab Newsletter

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids

Fun and Easy Halloween Crafts for Kids | TinkerLab.com

 

Fall Craft Ideas: Leaf Drawing

This fall craft idea is also a simple creative invitation that doesn’t require a lot of fancy tools and won’t come with a big mess. If you’re new to the idea of creative invitations, this article has all the details you’ll need to get started.

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

Supplies for Fall Leaf Drawing

  • Leaves
  • Colored pencils or your favorite mark-making tool
  • Paper

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

My 4-year old and I took a bike ride and she chose this selection of leaves. We arranged them on the table and she added a crystal. Because, you know, it looks better that way.

We marveled at all the colors in the leaves and then I invited her to draw them. We used Lyra Ferby colored pencils (affiliate link) for the task. I love these crayon/pencils for little kids because they’re a bit fatter than standard colored pencils (with a 6.25 mm lead core), and they come with a triangle grip that makes them easy to hold.

My daughter still insists on holding her pencil with her pinky and seems quite comfortable with this grip. And I’m still working on helping her shift to a better grip! If this is something that your child struggles with, this post has some great tips in the comments.

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing | TinkerLab

The Fall Leaf Drawing Set-up

Set up a large sheet of drawing paper, scatter a few leaves around, and place freshly sharpened colored pencils on the table.

Invite your child to look closely at the leaves and notice the variety of colors and shapes, and then discuss what you see.

Some questions to ask:

  • What colors do you notice?
  • Do any of the colors surprise you?
  • How many points does this leaf have? Let’s count them together.
  • Which of these leaves could have come from the same tree?
  • Do you have a favorite leaf in this collection? What makes it your favorite?

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

Experiments in Drawing Fall Leaves

I sat across the table from my daughter and we drew leaves together. I always encourage my kids to experiment, and one way to do that is by modeling. As I colored my leaves in I layered one color on top of another. I noted that the red blended into green on one of the leaves, and tried to replicate that in my sketch.

My 4-year old payed attention to that and then pushed it one step further as she colored one of her leaves blue and purple, and gave another blue veins…because she liked the way it looked. Rock on! If you child goes for the unexpected, encourage him or her to go for it. The goal is to use the leaves as a starting point, and then layer that with interpretation and imagination.

More Leaf Projects

Make adorable Leaf Critters by painting directly on leaves with acrylic paint.

Preserve your Fall leaves in glycerin

Make coffee filter suncatchers in leaf shapes

Is this your first time here?

Join the Tinkerlab network and be the first to know about simple art + science projects for kids, creativity tips, and simple ideas that will make your life more creative. Sign up for our newsletter.

TinkerLab Newsletter

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids