Jellybean Matzo House

DSC_0047

 This article was first shared in April 2011.

How to build a jellybean matzo house for Passover.

We had more than our fair share of Easter sweets this weekend, but I had a plan all along to purge our house of all that extra sugar by “gluing” it to some sort of base, like a paper plate, and calling it art.

As I talked to my almost three-year old about the idea, we mused over what we could glue our candy to. Something bigger than a cracker. Something flat. Something hard. Something we already had in our pantry.

And then it occurred to us — Matzo!

The irony of mixing Easter jellybeans with Passover matzo isn’t lost on me. As I laughed about this with my husband, we also realize that this is a fair representation of of our melting pot family. And I’m sure we’re not the only ones these ingredients on hand?!

What I especially love about this project, which looks oh-so-similar to the beloved gingerbread house, is the reminder that we can borrow ideas from other seasons. Here’s another seasonal mash-up from last summer: Easter in August.

How to build a matzo house

N started with some matzo and enjoyed breaking it into smithereens. She’s two, after all. Totally unusable for this project, but super fun.

If you’ve ever broken matzo with the intent of making neat little sandwich, you know that matzo has a mind of its own and can be completely unpredictable.

First, break your matzo…carefully

After accepting my fate that we would use uneven pieces, my husband messed around and came up with this strategy: Place the tip of a knife into the middle of the matzo, on the groove that you want to break…

And then press down.

It’s still a little wobbly, but it worked SO much better than my sad attempt at breaking them by hand.

I since found another strategy that sounds worthwhile: dip your finger in water and run it down the groove you intend to crack. It will soften the matzo just enough so that you can get a clean break.

Then we attached the pieces together with ornamental frosting, which dries hard. Our ornamental frosting was too runny for the job, but I’ll share the recipe below just in case you want it. Instead, I’d recommend the royal icing recipe that we used for our gingerbread houses.

Recipe for Royal Icing

Recommended

  • 1/8 cup Meringue Powder
  • 1/4 cup Cold Water
  • 2 cups sifted Confectioners Sugar

Add water to meringue powder and beat until soft peaks form. Add sugar into the mixture and beat until it’s the desired consistency. Add more sugar for stiffer icing.

Ornamental Frosting

Used in the pictures of this article

  • 4 cups powdered sugar (one box)
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 3 egg whites

Blend it together until smooth. If you’re not using the frosting right away, cover the top of your bowl with a damp towel to keep it moist.

We attached the “wall” pieces to a large matzoh base.

And then added jellybean decorations. That leaning wall is the result of one of my hand-breaking attempts. Sad. Looks like a foundation problem.

I finally conceded to the frosting-coated jellybean eating request. I can be tough!

We thought the white frosting made this was looking way to wintery, and not at all spring-like…

…so we colored our frosting green.

And then there was more…eating! It looked a bit like Roman ruins…

How to build a jellybean matzo house

So we added a roof. Voila! Jellybean Matzo House (with icicles) for Spring.

Resources

Do you have a good idea or tip for making candy houses?

This post was shared with Craft Schooling Sunday, Skip to my Lou, Sun Scholars

Sister Corita Kent | Art Department Rules

Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail

Corita Kent

I was grew up in Los Angeles, not too far from what was once Immaculate Heart College (IHC). Perhaps one of the biggest legacies of IHC is Sister Mary Corita, better known to many as Corita Kent, artist-activist and chairperson of the IHC art department from 1951-1968.

Do you know about Corita Kent? In her own art, she was primarily a printmaker who used film, calligraphy, folk art, and advertising to help her students think creatively and make the world a better place through art.

Her Art

corita kent art

To give you a little context on Corita’s aesthetic, you may be most familiar with her 1985 “LOVE” postage stamp, or if you live in the Boston area you’ve undoubtedly spotted this colorful water tank

Her Writing

learning by heart corita kentI was first introduced to Corita by a friend of mine who directs the Corita Kent Art Center, located at Immaculate Heart High School in Los Angeles. Sasha suggested that I pick up a copy of Kent’s book, Learning by Heart: Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit.

At the time, the book was out of print and the almost impossible-to-find copies could be had for $50 and up. Gasp! Thankfully, I forked out the cash and my life was forever changed.

The book is full of ideas for new artists, artists who could use a little kick in the creative pants, and especially art students. I found my copy just before heading off to graduate school, and still enjoy flipping through it for nuggets of inspiration to this day. I would also recommend this book to any parent with a pre-teen or teenager who’s eager to soak up fresh ways to use art as a form of intervention or social justice.

Corita Kent Classroom

Thankfully, the book is back in print again, and can be had for far less than what I paid (lucky you!). You can find a copy over here on Amazon.

And if that’s not enough, Corita Kent wrote up this list of Art Department Rules that is so fabulous, I know you’ll want to save it to your desktop, just like I have. Or pin it. Or tape it to your fridge. I just love it.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

A Question For You…

If you could pick just one of these rules to remember, which one would it be?

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

note: this post contains affiliate links

Evolution of the Art Table

Drawing on the Art Table

Over the course of a week, our art table gets worked pretty hard.

My kids begin almost every morning with some kind of making that may involve markers, colored pencils, tape, glue, or paint. And then there’s the occasional snack or meal that go along with art-making when my girls are too busy to stop the magic for food.

I thought it might be fun to take a look at how the table evolves throughout the week.

Here we go…

Evolution of the Art Table: See how a child's craft table changes over the course of a week.

I’m attracted to the fresh start of clean, brown craft paper. Even though the surface of our art table is covered with paint stains, I find that the paper covering gives my children (and me) more freedom to drip paint, and along with that comes peace of mind.

I’m often asked about our craft paper — I pick it up at our oversized hardware store for about $14/roll. If you’d like to order some online, this craft paper on Amazon looks like it’s the same product.

Ah, isn’t that clean table-top lovely?!

A few days later, the table is covered with dry paint drips, watercolor splits, and pencil marks. My kids sometimes take this as an opportunity to use the craft paper itself as inspiration for new pieces of art.

Evolution of the Art Table: See how a child's craft table changes over the course of a week.

At some point we deem that the soaked/torn/dirty craft paper has served us well and we roll it up to recycle. We then spend a day or two with dry media like markers, stickers, and crayons.

And breakfast. That’s important too.

Evolution of the Art Table: See how a child's craft table changes over the course of a week.

Finally, we’re ready to get back to painting and otherwise mucky art, so I recover the table and make it an inviting scene once again.

Evolution of the Art Table: See how a child's craft table changes over the course of a week.
Evolution of a Child's Art Table: How the art table changes over the course of a week.

A question for you…

How does your art table transform across a week? And do you cover your art table with paper?

 

If you liked this post, you might enjoy checking out the Creative Table Series and How to Organize a Self-Serve Art Space.

 

*this post contains affiliate links

Art Tips: The Bits and Pieces Box

Art Tips: The bits and pieces box

Weekly Art Tips on Tinkerlab.comToday’s art tip is brought to us by one of my very favorite creative mom bloggers, Ali Wright. This trick is so easy to put in motion — and the payoff can be big. After reading it I’d bet that you won’t look at scraps of paper quite the same way again. As Ali puts it, this is a” frugal way to supply the kids with interesting, varied and free materials.”

Art Tips: The bits and pieces boxHi, I’m Ali. I am a mom to two arty kids. My kids can go through large quanities of art supplies in a very short space of time. So, I am always on the look out for ways to supplement our art and craft materials without breaking the bank.

I am a big collector. I keep an old shoebox which I fill with all sort of things that I think might appeal to the kids. We call it the bits and pieces box…. and this is what is currently in it –

  • Promotional postcards which I find in cafes and shops
  • Maps and tourist brochures from museums and hotel foyers
  • Clothing tags that are pretty or interesting
  • Theatre programs (I don’t actually get to the theatre I just collect the programs)
  • Old discarded paintings by the kids
  • Wrapping paper and tissue paper
  • Tickets of all sorts – dry cleaning stubs, movie tickets, raffle tickets
  • Art exhibition catalogues
  • Used envelopes with interesting stamps
  • Old greeting cards

Art Tips: The bits and pieces box

This box is kept in sight but out of reach.

I pull it down when the kids ask me or when we are working on an art project that needs some extra materials. When the box comes down from the shelf they get very excited to see the latest additions.

The funny thing about the bits and pieces box is that I can never predict what is going to appeal to my kids. Sometimes they pounce on something I would never expect. I threw in some bank forms last week – they were a big hit.

Art Tips: The bits and pieces box

I don’t throw every piece of paper that comes my way into the bits and pieces box… it would need to be huge if I did that! I am selective: I particularly avoid shopping catalogues.

I look for interesting imagery, quirky uses of text and colour as well as a range of paper types and textures.

My bits and pieces box is a very frugal way to supply the kids with interesting, varied and free materials. The majority of the materials in the box were destined for the recycling bin. This way they are given a second chance at life in the hands of my mini makers.

Ali Wright Ali is a blogger and mother of two kids who adore art and crafts. Making things is a part of everyday life. Ali is also a designer and DIY crafter. She lives with her family in Sydney Australia and shares her creative adventures on her blog At Home with Ali. You can also find her on PinterestFacebookGoogle+ and Instagram.

Explore Modern Artists: Print Like Ellsworth Kelly

Ellsworth Kelly Printing Activity | Tinkerlab.com

Today we’re joined by illustrator and art educator Amanda E. Gross, who’s here to share another fun episode of Explore Modern Artists! 

Explore Modern Artists with Kids : series of projects on Tinkerlab

In the spirit of modern artist, Ellsworth Kelly,  your child might enjoy exploring nature’s shapes to create a stencil and make a painting!


Ellsworth Kelly (1923 -) is a master print-maker.  His plant drawings and screen-prints of simple shapes in brilliant hues are based on a deep reverence for nature.  Inspired by the Kelly retrospective currently at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, this activity is about noticing details, abstraction, and investigating new ways of expression.  

Ellsworth Kelly Prints

Artists use elements – or ingredients – in different ways, and abstract artists use them to express how they think and feel.

To begin, you might discuss the lines, colors, and shapes in pictures with which your child is familiar.  You could even do a tableaux vivant to physically explore the forms.  Next, you might read a book such as Leo Lionni’s Mathew’s Dream, about art appreciation; the illustrations, in which bright, abstract shapes are used to create representational images, can be a good way to introduce abstract art to children.  You may also want to show your child a few of Kelly’s images and ask such as:

  • What do you see?
  • Do these pictures look like things in real life?  Why or why not?
  • How do they make you feel?  Why?
  • What colors / lines / shapes do you see?
  • How do the colors make you feel?
  • Do the colors seem different when they are right next to each other?

Step 1: Draw

Ellsworth Kelly Printing Activity | Tinkerlab.com

Kelly began each image with a drawing.

Set up a still life of plants or fruit, or go findflowers outside.  Because this is an abstract drawing, observe what you see and pick out the basic shapes.

Draw large since you will cut these out.

Step 2: Stencil

Kelly 2

When your child is finished drawing, use scissors to cut out the shapes.

If you have cuts in your stencil that you don’t need, feel free to tape them up.

Step 3: Paint

Kelly 3a

Put a piece of paper (or cloth) under your stencil.  Choose a paint color.  So that your painted shape retains the outline of the stencil, try holding it down as you paint inwards from the stencil’s edge (or, you could tape down your paper and stencil instead of holding it).

Step 4: Design

Kelly 4

Use your imagination to experiment with how different colors act when placed next to each other, and explore making symmetrical and asymmetrical designs.

Alternatives

Ellsworth Kelly Printing Activity | Tinkerlab.com

If you’d like to do the project sans water and paint, try cut-and-pasted shapes.  For a new challenge, try screen-printing; to construct your screen, staple a nylon stocking onto a frame. Draw your plant forms onto the back of shelf liner paper, cut out these shapes, and adhere the sticky part to your screen.  (See image above) Paint!

Explore modern artists with kids: Ellsworth KellyResources:

More from Explore Modern Artists with Kids

Paint like Jasper Johns

Painting with Edward Hopper

Ellsworth Kelly Images

Top Row: Grape Leaves III, 1973-74. Lithograph on 300-gram Arches paper, 47¼ x 31½ inches. Edition of 50. © Ellsworth Kelly and Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles. Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation. Red White, 1962. 80 1/8 in. x 90 1/4 in. (203.52 cm x 229.24 cm, Acquired 1966. Collection SFMOMA, T. B. Walker Foundation Fund purchase

Bottom Row: Red Blue Green,  1963, 83 5/8 x 135 7/8 inches (212.4 x 345.1 cm), Oil on Canvas, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Jack M. Farris.  Colors on a Grid (close-up), 1976. Screenprint and Lithograph on 350-gram Arches 88 paper, 48¼ x 48¼ inches. Edition of 46. © Ellsworth Kelly and Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford, New York. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer.

Amanda E. Gross_headshotAmanda designs curricula to guide and inspire children, teens, and adults to appreciate art and to create!  She earned a Master’s of Arts in Teaching from The Rhode Island School of Design and is an instructor at Academy of Art University.  Amanda is also an illustrator, painter, DIY crafter, and permaculture enthusiast. Find out more about Amanda here: Art Curricula WebsiteArt Portfolio WebsiteLinkedIn, and Pinterest.

 

Highlights from the Creative Table Project

creative table instragram image big

It’s been a super busy and creative month over in the Instagram Creative Table Challenge.

creative table instragram image big

A few weeks ago I shared that we had 750 inspiring creative table entries on Instagram. Today there are over 1100 creative table invitations, set-ups, ideas, and playful explorations to browse and get ideas from!

Amazing, right?!

Just as I did last month, I thought it would be fun to spotlight a few highlights that represent the range of creative experiences that are happening all over the world.

If you’d like to see all of the Creative Table ideas that are popping up, you can  search #creativetable on Instagram or type “creativetable” into the search bar on Followgram.

 

share your creativetable on instagram

Join the Challenge

If you’re on Instagram and would like to play, we would LOVE to have you. Please read these guidelines first, and then be sure to add the hashtag #creativetable to your image. And who knows…maybe I’ll spotlight your image in my next Creative Table Post!

A note about the images: Beneath each photo is the name and Instagram handle of the person the image belongs to, and any descriptive text that they added to their photo. I hope that these images inspire you as much as they inspire me!

Jen Kossowan MamaPapaBubba

Jen Kossowan @mamapapabubba

Sharpies and blown up balloons… Perhaps the simplest creative table ever. #creativetable #invitationtocreate

Light Table with Natural Objects

#playinvitation #creativetable nature treasures on the light table #yesIvebeenplaying #creixercreant

Discovery table with magnifying glasses

Something for after quiet time :) #creativetable

Make your own Easter Egg Craft

Happy Tuesday everyone. The pretty colours in our Easter garland are making me smile. What’s making you smile today? #playmatters #creativetable

Scratch Art inspired by Miro Drawing in an art book

These kid art books are a wealth of inspiration. #creativetable #philadelphiamuseumofart

Paint pinecones with glittery paint

Painting our nature finds together. #connectwithplay #pinecones #creativetable

Make your own solar system memory game

the boys illustrated their own solar system themed memory game #creativetable

Painting Leaves Outdoors with Kids

painting leaves, teaching them observation. #creativetable #vscocam

Making your own wrapping Paper with stamps

Getting wrapping paper ready for a birthday party tomorrow! #creativetable #blog

MORE ABOUT THE CREATIVE TABLE PROJECT

Highlights from last month’s Creative Table: Creative Table Project on Instagram

Follow me on Instagram

Homemade {Easy, Low-cost} Light Table

Easy low cost homemade light box

My 2-year old came down with a fever last week and we’ve been more or less house-bound. It’s no fun at all, but it’s made me pretty resourceful around the house. One big win was pulling out our homemade light table.

My 4-year old, who used to love this box, seems to have grown out of it (sniff — maybe it’s a phase?), but my 2-year old was right at home sorting and designing compositions.

Easy Low Cost Homemade Light Table

I’m a fan of things that light up. Light Tables are wonderful for exploring the play of light, shadow, color, and transparency. Their unique nature can add a magical element to child’s play and encourage curiosity, exploration, and problem-solving.

If you’ve been following my blog, you may remember the overhead projector that we salvaged for just $5 from Stanford’s Re-Use Department or the DIY Light Table that we filled with salt and water beads.

Build a Light Table

I wanted to include a light box tutorial in my forthcoming book and recognized that our light box wouldn’t be easy for other parents or caregivers to replicate, so I started tinkering. Once I wrapped my head around this project, it couldn’t have been simpler.

Like painfully simple! Wait ’til you see.

If you don’t already have one of these, you’ll wonder why not.

Rubbermaid Light Box with Christmas Lights

Light Box Materials

  • Under-the-bed style clear storage box. Ours is made by Rubbermaid. It’s 6″ x 17″ x 28″ , the lid is clear, and it has has a latching lid. I found ours at either Target or Ace Hardware, and here’s a link to what appears to be the same box via Amazon: Rubbermaid Storage Box. I’ve also spotted really nice boxes at IKEA, which may be worth hunting down.
  • White Tissue Paper (the kind you wrap gifts with), wax paper, or tracing paper. My preference is white tissue paper. Stay clear of parchment paper as it’s impossible to tape it to anything.
  • Clear Tape
  • String of holiday lights
  • Extension cord: optional

Directions

  1. Tissue Paper: Line the inside of the lid with tissue paper and tape it in place. Use clear tape so that the tape doesn’t show. 
  2. Holiday Lights: Spread a string of holiday lights around the inside of your box. The cord will dangle out. We were able to close our box on the cord, but this isn’t necessary.
  3. Play! Place a few bowls of transparent manipulative materials near the light box and invite your child to create.
  4. Seed the project: My kids are most responsive to this invitation if I seed the table with a few ideas. I set all of the materials out as you see in the photo above. My 2-year old saw this and added a red circle in the middle of one of the “flowers.” Then she decided to build a whole series of flowers with my assistance (below).

Homemade Light Box

Design Materials that we use

Light Box manipulatives

More cool design materials that you might enjoy

Store-bought Light Box Options

If making your own light box doesn’t appeal to you, there’s an enormous selection of store-bought options to choose from. We also have this sweet little 5″ x 7″ Gagne Light Panel that I found at a local art store. It doesn’t have the big-impact, scale-wise, as our homemade box, but it’s not too expensive, portable, and I love it for tracing projects (mama makes art too!).

plug in light table

Blog Love

I couldn’t have written this post without mentioning that as I was working on this project, my friend Anna at The Imagination Tree posted her own DIY Light Box for Sensory Play. Our projects are nearly identical, and this isn’t the first time this has happened! Click on the links to see how Anna made her sensory light box.

Two years ago we both posted the same project, on the same day. Here’s a peak: If you have a toddler, you might also enjoy my Colander Sculpture and Anna’s Discovery Box Pipe Cleaners. The Imagination Tree is one of my favorite blogs. If you’re a hands-on parent I’m sure you’ll love it too, so do check it out if it’s not already on your radar.

 

Art Tips: Low-cost Stamps made from Cosmetic Wedges

Art tips Series | Tinkerlab

Weekly Art Tips on Tinkerlab.comHave you ever made a stamp from a cosmetic wedge?

A few weeks ago I shared this art tip about how you can salvage paper scraps that are left behind on the art table, and I invited you to let me know here and on Facebook if this was a series worth exploring. Enough of you said “yes,” that I thought I’d launch this new series and give it a whirl.

Art tip:  Upcycle cosmetic wedges as inexpensive stamps

Today’s art tip

Upcycle make-up sponges into easy, homemade stamps.

If you don’t have any cosmetic sponges in your home, they’re easily found in most dollar stores or the make-up aisle of the pharmacy. The wedges have a spongy texture that’s dense enough to hold ink or paint. I spotted this bag of 100 cosmetic wedges on Amazon for about $7.00, which is another option.

Because the wedges have a triangle shape there are only so many things you can do with them, but we found that they’re great for snipping up a heart-shaped stamp. One point of the triangle becomes the bottom of the heart, and then a few simple snips of the scissors will give you a nicely shaped heart.

All of mine came out a little wobbly, but this gives them handmade character.

Art tips: Make-up Sponge Printing

For a more archival picture or card, you can roll out some water-based printing ink like we did, but the cosmetic sponge stamps will work well dipped in a thin pool of tempera or acrylic paint. Washable tempera is more finicky, but great for messy, little hands. Acrylic paint isn’t washable, but it’s a good alternative to printing ink for painting on fabric or something more archival.

So, do you have any cosmetic wedges that are itching to be turned into a stamp? Would you try this?

A question for you

Are there any areas of art-making that you wonder about or struggle with? What other art tips would you like to see covered here?

 

Paint with glue, and how to make your own colored glue

How to color and paint with glue | Tinkerlab

My 2-year old is going through the phase of wanting to squeeze all the life out of any tube of paint, toothpaste, or glue that crosses her path. Have you had, or do you have, a child in that phase as well?

Paint with glue | Tinkerlab.com

I remember this phase well. When my older daughter hit it, I made up a big batch of flour + water paint so that she could squeeze all she wanted. It was an economical solution that allowed her to squeeze, squeeze, squeeze without multiple visits to the art store for more paint.

In a similar vein, we recently made colored glue when we added liquid watercolors to some simple white glue. The girls love it, especially the younger one, and it’s now a staple of our creative zone. The colors of the glue are rich, the consistency is easy to squeeze, and it doesn’t break the bank, especially since we stock up on glue with a gallon-size bottle of Elmers Washable School Glue.

Paint with colored glue | Tinkerlab.com

Materials

  • White glue bottles or other empty squeezable bottles
  • Liquid watercolors or food coloring
  • Cardstock or other heavyweight to squeeze glue onto
  • A tray to catch the drips
  • Sequins and other treasures (optional)

Directions

Add a few drops of food coloring to the glue, cap the bottle, and shake until well-mixed.

paint with glue2

Glue as you wish!

Learning outcomes

Yes, learning is embedded in this experience! This activity is great for developing hand muscles, problem solving, making aesthetic choices, and exploring the limitations and possibilities of glue. It also teaches children how to control the flow of glue, which is a fantastic skill that will transfer over to squeezing shampoo and ketchup bottles.

Note: Links in this article may lead to an affiliate site. I only share products that I love and/or think you’ll find useful. 

 

 

Kids Valentine Ideas – How to Set up a Self-serve Card Station

How to set up a self-serve Kids Valentine Card Station

Self Serve Kids Valentine Cards - Tinkerlab

There are some adorable store-bought Valentine Card options for kids, but there’s nothing quite like making your own Valentine’s Day cards. One of my strongest Valentine’s Day memories is of cutting and pasting doilies with hand-cut hearts, and this is a tradition that I’m excited to pass along to my own children.

One of the most successful strategies for encouraging art-making and creativity in my home is to set up self-serve areas filled with a buffet-style selection of materials for my kids to choose from.

I first introduced this self-serve kids Valentine card station on my blog last year, and with Valentine’s Day right around the corner, this seemed like a good time to share it again.

How to set up a self-serve Kids Valentine Card Station

How to set up a Self-serve Kids Valentine Card Station

  1. Start a thoughtfully selected smorgasbord of wrapping paper, scrapbooking paper, construction paper, paper cut into heart shapes, flowers, silk flower petals, shiny paper, doilies, and stickers
  2. Fill clear containers or bowls with these materials
  3. Add a bottle of glue or a small jar filled with glue, and a paintbrush.
  4. Invite your child to make, play, and create. Invitations can be accepted or ignored. I always try to pay attention to how these things play out because, of course, I want my invitations to be accepted!! If it’s ignored, it could be that the timing wasn’t right, your child isn’t yet ready for this invitation (maybe it’s too challenging or not of interest), the materials are too familiar, or the set-up wasn’t appealing enough.

5. Be open to riffs. While you may have a clear idea of how the invitation will play out in your mind, your child will probably have a very different idea. If you can accept this, you’ll both be happy!

Mailboxes are always nice to have for Valentine’s Day. We’re fans of all-things-handmade and actually made our own mailbox last year, but the hand-made Valentine box truly couldn’t compete with this light-up Hello Kitty mailbox.

More Valentine’s Day Mailboxes

Click an image to find the product on Amazon.

 

More Valentine’s Day Activities

Deconstructed Valentines

All-in-one Valentine Envelope

Valentine’s Day Ideas Pinterest Board

Organize a self-serve Creativity Area for Kids

Do you have any favorite tips for setting up a successful self-serve art experience?

Note: I’m an Amazon affiliate, but only share links to products that I love or that I think you’ll find useful.

Easy String Art Experiments for Kids

Easy String Art Painting with Kids

“The painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through.”

– Jackson Pollack, American Painter

String Art

Creating string art is a fun mix of art, creative thinking, and experimentation all rolled into one open-ended package.

If you’ve been following this blog for a while you’ll know that when it comes to children’s projects, my focus lies on the experience of creating more than the product.

String Art

My 4-year old, who has been calling herself Leia for the past month (as in Princess Leia — and yes, she’s been wearing the Leia costume she got for Christmas for the past 24 hours!), adds string to everything she makes. And my 2-year old, who we like to call Rainbow on this blog (here’s the story of how that began), said that she wanted to paint. So this experience was the perfect marriage of their interests on this rainy morning.

To get started, you only need a few simple materials.

Materials

  • Washable tempera paint, poured into small bowls
  • Short pieces of string
  • Copy paper and/or cardstock
  • Spoons to help cover the string in paint
  • Table covering (optional)
  • Baby wipes or a damp towel to clean hands

Easy String Art Painting Experiment with Kids

Creative Invitation

Without giving my children too much direction, I like to set up our projects up as invitations to create. I might make a suggestion or give a brief prompt, but I trust that the materials speak volumes to children. The less that I interject, the more opportunity they’ll have to find their own voice and make independent decisions.

With this project, Leia and Rainbow spent some time dancing their painted strings across the paper. After this ran its course I folded a sheet of paper in half and offered a suggestion that they could try pulling the string through the shut paper.

More experiments

This resulted in a symmetrical mirror image painting, which inspired Leia to try pulling more than one string through the paper at once. She then tested the process of holding one paint-soaked string in each hand, and pulling them through at the same time. I obviously needed to step in an assist her on this one.

Easy String Art Painting Experiment with Kids

They struggled with gaining control over the string and occasionally complained about getting paint on their hands, but the complexity of working with this tricky combination of paint and string challenged them to work with familiar materials in a new way.

Experiment Ideas

String Art Painting

Would you try this combination in your home? Have you tried it already?

What other materials could you combine with paint to make it more interesting and less common?

Marbled Paper Suminagashi

suminagashi prints

Are you looking for a last-minute hands-on gift, or maybe an idea to bookmark for a cold winter day? I’ve been saving this Suminagashi kit for a quiet morning and it was a true winner with both my 2-year old and 4-year old.

The process of marbleizing paper encourages creative thinking, open-ended exploration with ink and water, and experimentation.

Marbled Paper with Suminagashi

But first, maybe you’ve noticed that it’s been a little quiet around here. I’m sorry that I’ve kind of dropped the ball on my blog this month. I’ve been hunkering down with my other writing project and something had to go sit on the back burner. (sorry, bloggy).

Maybe you didn’t notice, in which case — yay! You’ve probably been busy too. It’s the holiday season after all. What are your plans for the holidays? Have you been baking? Are you going anywhere tropical or fun?

My kids finished making and packing their gifts for friends, my shopping is all but done, and now only the dreaded box of holiday cards is staring at me from across the room, waiting for messages of holiday cheer and stamps (that have yet to be purchased — eek).

But that can wait just a few more minutes because I have to share this important, colorful, festive, and fun art meets science experience with you…

Marbled Paper

I ordered our Suminagashi kit from Amazon for about $16 and you can find it here: Marbling Kit, Japanese Suminagashi. I just checked and if you order today it’ll arrive before Christmas. You know, just in case.

The beautiful word, suminagashi, translates from Japanese to mean “spilled ink.” I love saying suminagashi, and hearing my kids try to say it is a-dorable. Suminagashi is traditionally done with Sumi Ink, which is oily. Since oil floats on top of water, guess what? So does the Sumi ink! The ink that comes in this kit is non-toxic and “made by high-grade cosmetic pigment with P.V.A via a special process.” Loosely translated from Japanese, I assume.

The kit is recommended for ages 6 and up, probably more for dexterity reasons than anything. Both of my children handled the dyes quite capably — my younger daughter with a little help — so I wouldn’t let the age thing stop you if that’s a concern.

Marbled Paper with Suminagashi

The process is fun and simple: Squeeze a little bit of color into a tray of water, swirl it around, drop a piece of paper on top, and you have a print.

Marbled Paper with Suminagashi

Marbled Paper with Suminagashi This is one of those projects that’s tough to stop at just one. Because each print is unique, it’s compelling to try multiple variations on the theme. This kept us active for a good hour, and when they were dry my 4-year old turned these into holiday cards for her fantastic teachers.

More Suminagashi around the web

If you’re interested in another version of this experience, we did some marbling experiments  a couple years ago with spectacular results: Marbleized Paper with oil and liquid watercolors.

Inner Child Fun shows how to make gorgeous concentric circles — I wish we had tried this ourselves. Next time!

The History of Suminagashi

Oder this book, How to Marbleize Paper if you’re interested in learning how to make 12 traditional marbleized patterns

**Note: I am an Amazon affiliate, but I only share links to products that I adore and/or think you’ll find useful**