How to Build with Box Rivets

Today we’re joined by TinkerLab reader and friend, Aricha Gilpatrick Drury who’s offered to show us how to build with box rivets. Aricha is a mom to four children and has a knack for tinkering. When she shared this uber-tinkering activity on our Facebook wall, we asked Aricha if she’d be so kind to share with us today. Lucky us, she said, “yes!”

If you’ve never built with box rivets before (we haven’t), you’re in for a treat. They’re simple plastic connectors that enable you build almost anything you can think of from cardboard: castles, theater sets, play structures, and more.

How to build with rivets and cardboard boxes |

About a year ago, my father sent the kids a package of Mr. McGroovy’s Cardboard Rivets (Amazon), which took up residence, half-forgotten on a shelf. My kids all love building with cardboard boxes, but I’d assumed the rivets would require a great deal of adult help and I was hesitant to introduce them. I was pleasantly surprised to be proved wrong when I finally got them out on a recent snow day.

Supplies: Build a Box with Rivets

My 9-year-old and I gathered our supplies:

Mr. McGroovy's Rivets |

How the Rivets Work

After a quick safety review for the punch (to avoid punching directly into one’s hand), we checked out the rivets to see how they worked. Two rivets are positioned on either side of the cardboard with the prongs at a 90-degree angle from one another. When the rivets are pressed together, the ridged prongs click securely and hold the two layers of cardboard together.


I demonstrated once, showing my son how to punch through two layers of cardboard then press the rivet together through the punched hole. Once he had the idea, which only took one demonstration, I turned him loose to design and build.

Build with Rivets and Cardboard

He started out by gathering all the boxes together and then arranged them into the general shape of the playhouse that he wanted to make. After getting a rough idea of where each box would go, he figured out which sides needed to be cut open and how to overlap the joints to secure the boxes together. For the most part, he was able to punch the holes and line up the rivets himself, though he needed an extra hand (or a longer arm) for some spots.

Creative Problem Solving

In a few places, the cardboard didn’t overlap and we used packing tape to join the pieces. When that proved to be far less reliable than riveting, he discovered that an extra piece of cardboard could be placed over both edges and riveted together, creating a much more stable joint.


He also discovered that he needed to do some pre-planning in a few places by securing the harder-to-reach rivets first and leaving the ones close to the edge for last.

His final touch was a door, which I cut for him using the box cutter. He designed a handle with a strip of leftover cardboard and riveted it on.


Once the house was complete, we carried it out for the rest of the children to explore. After an initial peek inside, they furnished it with pillows and blankets. Over the next couple days it became a play house, a castle, and a place to be alone. After a week in child care (including being moved by small children), the house is still standing solid.



Mr. McGroovy’s website has designs for using the rivets to create projects from your own cardboard boxes, as well as ideas from customers and tips for acquiring large appliance boxes.

Mr. McGroovy’s rivets on Amazon

Note: This post contains affiliate links for your convenience

Aricha Gilpatrick Drury on How to build with rivets and cardboard boxes | TinkerLab.comAricha Gilpatrick Drury is an early childhood consultant and mother of four. She comes from a long line of fixers and tinkerers and hopes to pass on a tinkering mindset to her children. She likes to test out her open-ended art and tinkering invitations in her husband’s in-home childcare program.

How to Blow Out an Egg, plus 3 Easy Tricks

Could you use some tips on how to blow out an egg and clean eggs for decorating? Hopefully, this will help you get started!

How to Blow out an Egg, plus 3 easy tricks


Today I’m excited to share three little tricks for simplifying blown-out eggs. Messy fun, right? If you’re a traditionalist, you might want to stop reading here. Otherwise, read on…

How to Blow out an Egg

Trick #1: Hand Drill

How to blow out an egg | TinkerLab

So, if you wanted a hollow egg, and were to puncture it in the traditional way, you might use a needle or a special egg-piercing tool like this.

But, if you’re running short on time or if you know your kids will be giddy at the site of a hand drill (do you see me raising my hand?), you could do what we did.

My Fiskateer friend, Angela (read my interview with Angela here), sent me this awesome little Fiskars hand-cranked drill that’s perfect for preschool hands. My kids (ages 4 and 2) didn’t drill the eggs, but I do recommend the drill if you’re looking for a beginner’s wood-working drill for older children.

I carefully drilled a hole in the top and bottom of the egg, and then blew the eggs out.

But that blowing business is an awful lot of work, which brings me to trick #2…

Trick #2: Baby Aspirator

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

If you have little kids in your house, chances are good that you have at least one of these lying around. Between my two kids and overly generous L & D nurses, we own about eight of these.

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

Yes please!!

As much as I like my tools, I also believe in tradition. When your kids are old enough to blow out an egg with their own lungs, this post from The Artful Parent will inspire you to help them give it a go.

Trick #3: A Box and Skewers

Once your eggs are blown out, you’ll want to decorate them.

The girls and I painted a few of our blown eggs with acrylic paint, and we used little espresso cups to keep our hands clean while also keeping the eggs from wobbling around the table.

This plan was moderately successful.

It worked beautifully for painting the top half of the egg, but as soon as you were ready to paint the other side there was the challenge of flipping the egg without ruining our work. Not to mention all that acrylic paint that crusted up on my cute mugs. Ugh.

blown eggs on skewer in box

Which is where this nifty idea comes in handy: Cut a few grooves into the edge of a box, push a skewer through your egg (you might have to make your holes a wee bit bigger to do this), and voila!

I can’t remember where I first saw this, but here are a few other folks that have tried this smart idea: Melissa at Chasing Cheerios used this technique to paint chalkboard and decoupaged eggs. And the Sydney Powerhouse Museum replaced the box with Tupperware, and then made charming hanging eggs.

How to Blow Out Eggs with 3 Easy Tricks | TinkerLab

Are any of these tricks new-to-you? I love learning new tricks…do you have another egg-decorating tip to share?

More Egg Decorating and Egg Activities

In case you missed our earlier posts, here’s what we’ve covered this week so far:

How to Make Natural Dye for Egg Decorating

Walking on Raw Eggs

Make Your Own Egg Tempera Paint

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

How to Make a Floating Egg

How to Walk on Raw Eggs. Really.

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Origami for Kids: Origami Rabbit

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

The origami rabbit is one of the easiest origami animals you can make, and my entire family finds making them entirely addictive.

When I was in grade school, I loved origami. One of my good friends was Japanese, and I have strong memories of folding cranes and boats in her house to hang on a community Christmas tree. The cranes were tricky, but learning the series of folds tested and strengthened our memories, while the physical folding was good for fine motor skills.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

And when I taught middle school, my students and I were inspired by the story of Sadako and the thousand paper cranes as we folded 1000 cranes to hang around our school in memory of Sadako and the victims of the Hiroshima atom bomb.

When I first did this with my 3 year old, she didn’t have a hand in this project, but once she turned four she could easily fold up a batch of these origami rabbits in one sitting.

Origami Rabbit Supplies

  • Origami Paper. You can find origami paper in shops such as Daiso, Paper Source, Jo-Ann Fabrics, and Amazon (affiliate)
  • Sharpie

How to Fold an Origami Rabbit

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold your paper in half to make a triangle.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold the creased side of the triangle up about 3/4″.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold one side toward the center, line up the points, and crease.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Match it on the other side.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Turn it around, and fold the bottom up about 1″. This will be the base.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Flip it over.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold the top point inside to create the top of the rabbit’s head. Crease.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Give your rabbit a face.

I used a Sharpie because washable markers would smear on this paper, but you may want to experiment with different kinds of drawing tools. Make one or make a bunch. Because they’re so easy to make, I find the process is pretty addictive and made a little family in a matter of minutes.

Display somewhere festive, hide them around the house, or plant them in funny spots around the neighborhood where friends might find them.

More Rabbit and Easter Ideas

If you’re looking for more Easter ideas this week, hop over to our list of 60 egg activities for kids (and grown-ups too) and The Chocolate Muffin Tree’s 10 Egg Activities and Experiments.

Don’t forget to pin this post for future reference!

How to Fold an Origami Rabbit

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Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Are you looking for Valentine Crafts for Kids? This project takes a bit of time since there are a few steps involved, but the results are treasures that will last a lifetime.

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Salt Dough Recipe

We used this same recipe from our salt dough Christmas ornaments

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • up to 1 cup water

Mix the water and flour together. Slowly add the water and mix until the dough comes together. If you add too much water the dough will be too sticky to work with. If that happens, simply add equal amounts of flour and salt to get a workable consistency.

  1. Flour your work surface
  2. Roll out the dough to 1/4″ thick
  3. Cut shapes with your favorite cookie cutter/s
  4. Place the dough on a baking sheet and cook at 200 degrees F for 2-3 hours. We didn’t have a lot of time, so we baked ours at 350 F for about 40 minutes, which is why some of them turned out puffy and brown. They’re still fine, however, and I’d recommend this route if you’re also short on time. Just keep an eye on the dough and make sure it doesn’t burn.
  5. Cool the pieces. They’re ready to paint!

Salt Dough Magnets: A Valentine Gift Made by Kids

Painting Supplies

  • Acrylic paint. This is a relatively inexpensive set that’s great for this project.
  • Paintbrushes. I haven’t tried this set, but it looks great!
  • Paper plate or other paint palette
  • Water bowl
  • Rag to absorb water from brushes
  • Table covering
  • Painting clothes (acrylic paints will stain clothes)
  • Paint markers, optional. We like Elmers Paint Pens and Sharpie Water-based Paint Pens

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Paint the salt dough with acrylic paint. Have a covered area nearby where these pieces can dry. Acrylic paint dries quickly!

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

When these were dry, we added a layer with paint markers to some of the pieces. My 3-year old loved this step.

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Magnet Supplies

This step is for grown-ups:

Once the paint is dry, turn the salt dough pieces over. Add a small dollop of glue. Goop makes a good product made by Goop called Craft Arte. It’s smelly and best used outside or in a well-ventilated space.

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Add the magnet to the glue and allow the glue to dry.

Be careful with these magnets. They are powerful and not for use by children.

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Gifts for Family and Friends

When the glue is dry, your magnets are ready to gift to family and friends or to save favorite mementos to your fridge.

Valentine Crafts for Kids: Salt Dough Magnets

We made these for Valentine’s Day, but with a different shaped cookie cutter, you could make these magnet gifts for Christmas, Mother’s Day, or a Birthday.

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Jody Alexander on TinkerlabToday I’m excited to introduce you to Jody Alexander. Jody is a librarian and bookmaker who teaches bookmaking from Wishi Washi Studio in Santa Cruz, CA, and also teaches classes through the newly-launched Creative Bug. Tinkerlab special: Jody is sharing a code for a Creative Bug discount at the end of this post.

Once you make one of these Bamboo Rubber Band Books, you’ll find tons of creative ways to fill them with your own ideas, use them as sketchbooks, fill them with writing practice, or turn them into gifts.

Welcome, Jody!

Kids love to make books. They really do! I have been making books with kids for about 15 years now. First going into my son’s classrooms and teaching him and his classmates various book structures and then teaching at different art camps.

How to Make a Rubber Band Book

The Bamboo Rubber Band Book is a simple and easy book structure to make with kids.  I have taught this structure to ages 5 years old and up and I can’t tell you how proud they all have been after making a book.  This book can be made with pages and covers that have already been pre-printed or decorated, or with blank pages to draw or write on later.  It is a great little book for drawings and a little story.

Materials Bambook Rubber Band Book


  • 8 ½ x 11 text weight paper (2-4 pieces – can vary)
  • 8 ½ x 11 cover weight paper (1 piece)
  • rubber band
  • bamboo skewer


  • scissors
  • hole punch
  • garden hand shears

Step one

Cut text weight paper into quarters – here is how do this without measuring:

  • Fold paper in half the long way
  • Open up

Step 1 Bambook Rubber Band Book

  • Fold paper in half the short way
  • Open up
  • Cut along fold lines

Step 2 Bambook Rubber Band Book

Step two

Cut the cover weight paper in the same way – you will end up with enough cover paper for two books

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Step three

Stack your cut paper sandwiching the text paper in between the two cover pieces

Step Three Bamboo Rubber Band Book copy

Steps four & five

Punch two holes along the spine of the book – approximately 1/2 inch from the spine edge and 1 inch from the top and bottom (this can vary but making the holes too close to the edges puts them at risk to rip out)

Cut the bamboo skewer to 5 inches in length with garden hand shears.

 Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Step six

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Thread the rubber band through the holes and capture the bamboo skewer – this will hold the cover and pages together.

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

You made a book! 

  • Put as many or as few pages in the book that fits your project.
  • Make a book out of pre-printed pages
  • Make a book out of blank pages and write or draw in it.
  • Enjoy your book!

Want to make more books? Or make this one fancier?

Orizomega and Japanese Side Sewn Binding Bambook Rubber Band Book copy

Learn how to make Orizomegami with me on Creativebug. Orizomegami is a traditional Japanese paper dying technique that is a fun and easy kid-friendly project that is perfect for book covers.

Creative Bug Bamboo Rubber Band BookAnd, if you are ready for a slightly more challenging binding – but still quite accessible to children – try my Japanese Side Sewn Binding for Kids class on Creativebug.

Thanks for introducing us to this book-making technique today, Jody! I’m so glad that we met and look forward to learning more from you through Creative Bug.