Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Jody Alexander on TinkerlabToday I’m excited to introduce you to Jody Alexander. Jody is a librarian and bookmaker who teaches bookmaking from Wishi Washi Studio in Santa Cruz, CA, and also teaches classes through the newly-launched Creative Bug. Tinkerlab special: Jody is sharing a code for a Creative Bug discount at the end of this post.

Once you make one of these Bamboo Rubber Band Books, you’ll find tons of creative ways to fill them with your own ideas, use them as sketchbooks, fill them with writing practice, or turn them into gifts.

Welcome, Jody!


Kids love to make books. They really do! I have been making books with kids for about 15 years now. First going into my son’s classrooms and teaching him and his classmates various book structures and then teaching at different art camps.

How to Make a Rubber Band Book

The Bamboo Rubber Band Book is a simple and easy book structure to make with kids.  I have taught this structure to ages 5 years old and up and I can’t tell you how proud they all have been after making a book.  This book can be made with pages and covers that have already been pre-printed or decorated, or with blank pages to draw or write on later.  It is a great little book for drawings and a little story.

Materials Bambook Rubber Band Book

Materials

  • 8 ½ x 11 text weight paper (2-4 pieces – can vary)
  • 8 ½ x 11 cover weight paper (1 piece)
  • rubber band
  • bamboo skewer

Tools

  • scissors
  • hole punch
  • garden hand shears

Step one

Cut text weight paper into quarters – here is how do this without measuring:

  • Fold paper in half the long way
  • Open up

Step 1 Bambook Rubber Band Book

  • Fold paper in half the short way
  • Open up
  • Cut along fold lines

Step 2 Bambook Rubber Band Book

Step two

Cut the cover weight paper in the same way – you will end up with enough cover paper for two books

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Step three

Stack your cut paper sandwiching the text paper in between the two cover pieces

Step Three Bamboo Rubber Band Book copy

Steps four & five

Punch two holes along the spine of the book – approximately 1/2 inch from the spine edge and 1 inch from the top and bottom (this can vary but making the holes too close to the edges puts them at risk to rip out)

Cut the bamboo skewer to 5 inches in length with garden hand shears.

 Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Step six

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

Thread the rubber band through the holes and capture the bamboo skewer – this will hold the cover and pages together.

Bamboo Rubber Band Book

You made a book! 

  • Put as many or as few pages in the book that fits your project.
  • Make a book out of pre-printed pages
  • Make a book out of blank pages and write or draw in it.
  • Enjoy your book!

Want to make more books? Or make this one fancier?

Orizomega and Japanese Side Sewn Binding Bambook Rubber Band Book copy

Learn how to make Orizomegami with me on Creativebug. Orizomegami is a traditional Japanese paper dying technique that is a fun and easy kid-friendly project that is perfect for book covers.

Creative Bug Bamboo Rubber Band BookAnd, if you are ready for a slightly more challenging binding – but still quite accessible to children – try my Japanese Side Sewn Binding for Kids class on Creativebug.


Thanks for introducing us to this book-making technique today, Jody! I’m so glad that we met and look forward to learning more from you through Creative Bug.

Creative Bug Discount Code:

Use this code for $15 off a monthly subscription to Creativebug: WISHIWASHI

 

Parenting with Positive Guidance

Amanda Morgan's E-course from Not Just Cute

Today I’m happy to welcome my friend and colleague, early childhood educator Amanda Morgan from the popular blog, Not Just Cute, to talk with us about parenting with positive guidance. Have you heard of this philosophy for raising children?

Without knowing it by name, I’ve come to learn that this is at the heart of my own parenting philosophy.

2010-morgan-family-134-21

Amanda is starting a new e-course, Parenting with Positive Guidance, which I’ve had the opportunity to preview and I’m more than impressed!

The first session alone is packed with over an hour of carefully crafted videos where Amanda will guide you through the principles and philosophy of positive guidance. I’ve seen Amanda’s relatable videos before this course, and I’ve always appreciated her candor and welcoming voice.

One of the nicest things about taking a course online is that you can pause the videos if you have to make snacks/break up a squabble/take a shower.  Welcome, Amanda!

Amanda Morgan's E-course from Not Just Cute

Work with the Water

I spent one of my most memorable summers as a river guide in Jackson Hole. It was amazing, and I learned a lot of things. One of the most important things I learned was how to work with the water.

After weeks of wearing myself out fighting to overcome the current, I finally realized that my job was easier, and more effective, when I worked with the water instead of fighting against it. I had spent time observing it and figuring out how it really worked. Learning to recognize the different pockets of currents and use the momentum to my advantage made it possible to navigate the water without a battle.

The same is true for many of the tools in the Parenting with Positive Guidance Toolbox. The theory and tools are based on how kids think, learn, grow, and develop, so that we can work with our kids’ strengths rather than battle against them.

Imagination and Storytelling

Using the incredible power of storytelling, imagination, and creativity is just one example.

In a study referenced in the book, Nurture Shock, researchers asked children to hold perfectly still for as long as they could. The result?

The young subjects stood still for just two minutes.

By contrast, when researchers asked children to pretend they were soldiers standing guard who had to hold perfectly still at their posts, children were able to stand still for a whopping 11 minutes!

stand like a soldier

When we struggle with child behavior, it isn’t always about the child’s capability or willingness to comply, it’s often about our approach and how we appropriately engage the child.

Using a child’s imagination and the power of storytelling works because it plays to a child’s strengths.

First, it uses imagery. Creating a picture in a child’s mind of what the desired behavior looks like conveys information and instruction in a split second that guides the child to the desired behavior. The old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words? It’s true here too!

Secondly, it speaks in the child’s own language. Playfulness, stories, imagination, it’s all right in the child’s wheelhouse. Just as I learned to harness the water’s strength to navigate the river we can also play to a child’s strengths to guide behavior.

How Positive Guidance looks in real life

  • As a teacher of a large first grade class, it was a challenge for me to get them to walk quietly down the halls. Finally, I began to make up stories – we were sneaking past a sleeping giant, tiptoeing away from a dragon — and suddenly we were the most stealthy crew in the halls!
  • Living with a house full of boys can get a bit noisy to say the least! When the stomping, marching, and running get too noisy for the little ones who may be sleeping on the floor below, I ask the boys to use their “ninja feet” which works much more quickly and to a much greater extent than my constant nagging to “quiet down” ever did!

Parenting with Positive Guidance

Sign up for the course

The example above from”Using the Enchanting World of Stories” is just one of ten tools taught in the Parenting with Positive Guidance Ecourse. The course teaches a variety of ways to work proactively to guide child behavior, as well as to establish appropriate boundaries and build real discipline in our children.

No book or course you take will ever change your child, but it can change you and the tools you use in your daily interactions.

It’s the change in those daily interactions that will create real change in your child.

Click here to view more details

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My Experience

Within an hour of signing up, I received email links to two companion e-books: Parenting with Positive Guidance: Tools for Building Discipline from the Inside Out and Patience for Parents.  The content of these books relates directly to the course videos, and will help reinforce the ideas that you’ll learn about.

Another nice surprise is that all of the comments from readers who have taken this course before you are still posted, and prove to be tremendously helpful when someone has an issue or question that you may have asked yourself.

Oh, and this is really nice too…Amanda is keeping the registration open for my readers through Wednesday, February 20, and she’s giving us a special discount rate if you take this course with a friend or partner.

Sign up for Parenting with Positive Guidance

If parenting with positive guidance is something that you’ve thought about before, I can’t recommend this course enough.

Register before February 20: Click here to view more details


Note: I’m an affiliate for Parenting with Positive Guidance. This post contains affiliate links, but I only share links to things that I love or that I think you’ll find useful. 

 

Fall Luminary: Make a Lantern

Crayon Shavings :: from Tinkerlab, Creative Experiments for Kids

Today I’m joined by Arts Educator extraordinaire, Amanda Gross, who’s back to show us how to make a Fall Luminary from leaves and melted crayons. Not only are these beautiful, but the processes of collecting leaves, peeling crayons, and melting the wax with an iron are sure to capture a child’s attention.

Make a Lantern!

Luminaries are perfect for brightening a crisp autumn evening, and a crafty way to explore this season when leaves turn brilliant colors, the rosy twilight falls more quickly, and families the world over traditionally give thanks for the harvest.

You might start by reading a book that poetically investigates the unique things of autumn, such as Lois Ehlert’s Leaf Man or Lauren Thompson’s Mouse’s First Fall.

Would your child like to make a colorful fall luminary, choosing materials from outside and around the house?

Step 1:
Wander around outside, and notice how the leaves have turned a multitude of colors and have gotten crunchy. Choose leaves that have fallen off of trees, but are not too dry and can still lay flat.  If leaves are very curly, you may consider pressing them in a heavy book for a few days, before using them.  Bring your collection inside and onto a table.

Step 2:
Find a clean mason jar that will serve as the structure for your luminary.  Measure the mason jar’s circumference with sting, and cut a wax paper strip that is long enough to fit around it. 

Step 3:
Gather crayons of your favorite colors.   Lanterns for the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival are often inspired by butterflies, so any hue goes!   Unwrap the paper covering the crayons, and shave them lengthwise over the wax paper, with a serrated knife or vegetable peeler.  If your child isn’t old enough to wield the knife, s/he could choose the crayon, the location, and how much pigment they’d like you to shave off.

Step 4:
Place leaves over the crayon shavings, and feel free to add more shavings on top.  Explain that the crayon wax will melt, and those little crumbs will become puddles of color.  Experiment with composition, and with layering the leaves and shavings.

Step 5:
Set up your ironing board and turn on the iron (If you are like me, and not the most experienced with this, here’s one of many online ironing tutorials).  On your ironing board, place a flat, thin cloth (the crayon wax will probably bleed through the wax paper a bit, so use scrap fabric and not “good” cloth), then carefully place your wax paper with the leaves and shavings.  Over this, put a blank sheet of wax paper, of around the same size.  Layer on another thin cloth, and smooth out the wrinkles with your fingers.  Spritz the top layer evenly with water from a spray bottle, and now you’re ready to iron.  Flatten out the wrinkles and iron both sides of the wax paper “sandwich.”

Step 6:
After waiting a few minutes for the wax paper to cool, peel away the cloth.  Measure your mason jar again, and cut the wax paper so that it fits around the jar, then tape or tie a ribbon around it to hold the paper in place.

Step 7:
When it gets dark outside, drop a candle into your mason jar, and ignite it with a long lighter.  The brilliant, glowing colors and winding lines of the leaves will surely be a cozy centerpiece for your family to gather around, and is an excellent reminder to be grateful for the season.

Resources

Picture Books About Fall on Goodreads

PreservingLeaves and a Leaf Lantern

Nature’sStained Glass

MeltedCrayon Luminaries

Amanda E. Gross_headshotAmanda designs curricula to guide and inspire children, teens, and adults to appreciate art and to create!  She earned a Master’s of Arts in Teaching from The Rhode Island School of Design and is an instructor at Academy of Art University.  Amanda is also an illustrator, painter, DIY crafter, and permaculture enthusiast. Find out more about Amanda here: Art Curricula WebsiteArt Portfolio WebsiteLinkedIn, and Pinterest.

Nature Table: Where Art, Stories, Memories, and Peace Unfold

make your own spiritual nature table
make your own spiritual nature table

Today I’d like to introduce you to Rashmie Jaaju, the mama behind the creative learning blog, Mommy Labs. I’ve known Rashmie since I started blogging and always appreciate her sincerity, mindful approach to parenting, and the passion she brings to raising a creative child. Furthermore, Rashmie lives in New Delhi, India, and I hope you’ll enjoy peeking into Rashmie’s colorful corner of the world as much as I do.

Welcome, Rashmie!


Hello friends, I’m elated to write for Tinkerlab today and be able to connect with all you wonderful, creative people. Rachelle is a long-time blogger friend and she’s an inspiration to me for the passion, creativity and focus she puts into her blog; as well as for the person and the mother that she is to her adorable kids.

I’d like to share with you all my Nature/Spiritual table. Actually, it’s not just a table but a part of our home that’s now synonymous with quiet time, peaceful vibes, nature inspiration and a place to get together as a family for a few moments of prayer and connection with the higher self.

 

How Our Nature Table Started

I’ve always loved collecting ‘finds’ from nature – fallen leaves, river stones, pine cones, drift wood, sea shells, feathers. I have dozens of boxes stuffed with these things; plus piles of books that hold leaves, flowers and petals within their pages.

It struck to me one day that keeping these natural elements in closed boxes and books is not serving the purpose. I’d much rather want to keep these beauties in front of my eyes so that my family and I can connect with nature inside our home, and also recollect the stories associated with them – the stories from trips, nature walks, beaches, treks…

So, in that whimsical, uplifting moment, I started this nature table.

All it took was a quick refurbishing of an old wooden table that I’d used for different purpose at different points in time. From being a pedestal for the refrigerator to a book shelf to a low dining table, this table has served various needs.

We scrubbed, painted and polished the table and found a clutter-free, well-lit, cozy space for it in the study room. There’s a big window right above the table and a door next to it that leads to a balcony overseeing vast open green land, so there’s ample sunlight and fresh air.

Nature Table for Spirituality and Meditation

The Table as a Natural Canvas

It’s been almost an year now and I’ve redecorated this space every two months or so introducing flavors from every season, a festival like Holi or Diwali, or family events (birthday, travel, anniversary). See some pictures of the nature table from winter 2012. And then, there’s always something to add after a nature walk in the near by park or in the neighbourhood.

Recently, we went on a trip to the Himalayan region in India (it’s called Himachal Pradesh) and we collected tons of things from the treks we took there. These have now become part of the nature table.

Interestingly, the nature table has become an artful corner in our home. It’s almost like a canvas for me and my daughter – Pari – who’s 6.5. She rejoices in laying out leaves, pebbles, feathers, pine cones on this square space. We love lighting aromatic candles and incense here. It also gives her a sense of ownership since she actively takes part in decorating this corner of the house…

Kids Connecting with nature in home with nature table

Spiritual Corner

My family sits in front of the nature table almost every day and we recite a Buddhist mantra (though we’re not Buddhist) and Sanskrit Shlokas, including a Gayatri Mantra. We play the Tibetan Singing Bowl. Read more about the meaning behind the singing bowl over here. You may also read on the same page about the Buddhist mantra – Nam Myo Ho Renge Kyo.

So, this nature table is a spiritual corner rather than a religious place of worship. It helps us fill our cup of peace and quiet. :-)

Buddha Nature Table

Even our guests – kids and adults alike – are immediately drawn to it. The moment my 2-year old niece, Sarah, enters our home, she heads for this corner. The gemstones, pebbles, feathers, copper bells, shells – she can engage herself with all these for an hour at least…!

nature art spirituality for children

Keeper of Memories

Above all else, as I look at each of the natural elements placed on this table, I can’t help but reminisce about the moments we found these pieces. The stories come alive through the mind’s eye. The drift wood for example – it came floating on the waves of the river Sutlej when Pari was playing along the bank. This river is on a volcanic bed, which gives the water a unique characteristic that’s also said to heal and alleviate joint aches. The water on the surface is chilling cold but thrust your toes just an inch deep and you’ll feel the heat instantly!

Every inch of the nature table tells a story. I’d say it’s a keeper of memories….!

nature table waldorf spiritual connection for kids

A Place to Reflect

This room is also where I sit everyday to write – be it for my blog or in my journal. There’s an aura to this space that makes me reflect and put them into words. As such, nature is the source of sustenance for my soul. And, art!

Do you have a spot in your home that’s dedicated to nature or spirituality? What helps you connect with your inner self? I would love to hear your story.


Rashmie writes about creative and natural learning for children at Mommy Labs. She takes inspiration from art, travel, books, photography and most essentially – the spiritual energy of nature to nurture a sense of wonder in young souls.

Make a Terrarium

How to Make a Terrarium

Today I’m joined by my friend and colleague, Amanda E. Gross, who I’ve had the pleasure of working with at the San Francisco Children’s Creativity Museum. She has an incredible eye for all things related to creativity and kids, and today she’s here to share some tips on how to make a terrarium. I’ve wanted to make one of these for a long time, and thrilled that Amanda is here to give us some guidance.

How to Make a Terrarium

Terrariums are the perfect project to stoke both the imagination and a curiosity for nature.

Before building your terrarium, you might like to start by reading a book about an outdoor critter (i.e, Eric Carle’s Very Quiet Cricket, Leo Leonni’s Inch by Inch, or Patricia Polacco’s The Bee Tree). After reading the story, find out if your child wants to build a home for the critter with materials from outside. Talk about the critter’s habitat and its other likes and wants that might be incorporated into your terrarium.

As alternatives, you could guide the project with a focus on fairy houses or on terrariums as little ecosystems. To begin, discuss the seasons and/or plant life cycle, and how the terrarium will incorporate sunlight, soil, and water, just like the plants’ environments outside. The little world your child creates will foster a sense of eco enjoyment and responsibility.

How to make a Terrarium

Step One

Take a stroll outside, getting up close to wonderful sensory experiences like dirt, pebbles and lush green plants.  Gather interesting leaves, sticks, acorns, etc. to use in the terrarium.  Soil, pebbles, and moss may be collected if available, or purchased.

Step Two

Bring your materials home and spread them out over a plastic sheet, and play around with combinations and the possibility of making a critter house.

How to make a Terrarium

Step Three

A clean fishbowl or Mason jar makes the perfect terrarium container.

How to make a Terrarium

Step Four

Add about an inch of pebbles to the fishbowl, for drainage. Pile on an inch or two of soil mixture, with chunks of activated charcoal for filtration and fertilizer. I’ve been told that pyrite is a good mix-in, but not necessary.

 

How to make a Terrarium

Step Five

Make small valleys to add plants, while their roots are still moist. I bought a succulent to add to my terrarium, a low-maintainance green buddy (it only needs water about once a week) that is fun to watch grow over time. Next, arrange moss, sticks, leaves, and other bits. I used the top of an eggplant for the roof of my critter house.

Step Six

Tailor the terrarium to your child’s interests and skill level. If appropriate, make a little critter friend to add; I made my bug out of plasticene clay and sticks for legs. You could add a literacy component by making a collage poem or haiku about the terrarium after creating it, using words and pictures from magazines.

Place your terrarium in indirect sunlight and make sure to water it every week or so if you have a succulent nested in there, and more often for temperate plants.

Resources:

Making Terrariums so Simple
Make a Kid-friendly Terrarium
Terrarium as a learning too for children
Twig: Purchase supplies for moss terrariums and other small worlds
Terrarium Figurines on Etsy
More Terrarium Figures on Etsy

Amanda E. Gross_headshotAmanda designs curricula to guide and inspire children, teens, and adults to appreciate art and to create!  She earned a Master’s of Arts in Teaching from The Rhode Island School of Design and is an instructor at Academy of Art University.  Amanda is also an illustrator, painter, DIY crafter, and permaculture enthusiast. Find out more about Amanda here: Art Curricula WebsiteArt Portfolio WebsiteLinkedIn, and Pinterest.