Origami for Kids: Origami Rabbit

How to make an origami rabbit or bunny.

The origami rabbit is one of the easiest origami animals you can make, and my entire family finds making them entirely addictive.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

When I was in grade school, I loved origami. One of my good friends was Japanese, and I have strong memories of folding cranes and boats in her house to hang on a community Christmas tree. The cranes were tricky, but learning the series of folds tested and strengthened our memories, while the physical folding was good for fine motor skills.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

And when I taught middle school, my students and I were inspired by the story of Sadako and the thousand paper cranes as we folded 1000 cranes to hang around our school in memory of Sadako and the victims of the Hiroshima atom bomb.

When I first did this with my 3 year old, she didn’t have a hand in this project, but once she turned four she could easily fold up a batch of these origami rabbits in one sitting.

Origami Rabbit Supplies

  • Origami Paper. You can find origami paper in shops such as Daiso, Paper Source, Jo-Ann Fabrics, and Amazon (affiliate)
  • Sharpie

How to Fold an Origami Rabbit

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold your paper in half to make a triangle.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold the creased side of the triangle up about 3/4″.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold one side toward the center, line up the points, and crease.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Match it on the other side.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Turn it around, and fold the bottom up about 1″. This will be the base.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Flip it over.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Fold the top point inside to create the top of the rabbit’s head. Crease.

How to make a simple and cute origami rabbit. It's so easy that kids can do this successfully. Perfect for Easter!

Give your rabbit a face.

I used a Sharpie because washable markers would smear on this paper, but you may want to experiment with different kinds of drawing tools. Make one or make a bunch. Because they’re so easy to make, I find the process is pretty addictive and made a little family in a matter of minutes.

Display somewhere festive, hide them around the house, or plant them in funny spots around the neighborhood where friends might find them.

More Rabbit and Easter Ideas

If you’re looking for more Easter ideas this week, hop over to our list of 60 egg activities for kids (and grown-ups too) and The Chocolate Muffin Tree’s 10 Egg Activities and Experiments.

Don’t forget to pin this post for future reference!

How to Fold an Origami Rabbit

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In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
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60 Egg Activities for Kids

These are really easy, and will give the kids a lot of variety for easter. Egg Activities for Kids!

If you’re on the hunt for fun and engaging egg activities for kids, this ginormous list should keep you busy for a few weeks. And it’s just in time for Easter and Easter Egg Hunts.

Egg Activities for Kids

Because the list is so large, I’ve broken it down into these categories: Egg Decorating, Plastic Eggs, Games, Painting and Sculpture, Crafts, and Science.

I hope you’ll enjoy getting inspired from and pinning these ideas as much as I enjoyed assembling this eggy line-up. If you have more ideas to share, please add them to a comment so that others can enjoy them too.

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Egg Decorating Activities for Kids

Henry’s First Egg Decorating: Vibrant Egg Dye, Crayon Resist, Marbled Eggs, Drip Dot Eggs (see photo above), Hands on as we Grow

Naturally Decorated Marbled Eggs, The Chocolate Muffin Tree

Blown out Easter Eggs, The Artful Parent

Three Easy Tricks for Blown Out Eggs, Tinkerlab

Easter Eggsperiments, Paint Cut Paste

Bleeding Tissue Easter Eggs, The Chocolate Muffin Tree

Austrian Egg Blowing, Red Ted Art

Vegetable Dyed Easter Eggs, Tinkerlab

Hot Easter Eggs Decorated with Crayons, The Chocolate Muffin Tree

Posting Letters to your Children inside Eggs (see photo above), Mommy Labs

Crayon Wax Resist Rainbow Eggs, A Little Learning for Two

Collage Eggs, The Artful Parent

Painted Eggs with Egg Crate Stands, A Mom with a Lesson Plan

I Love you Stinky Face Eggs decorated with googly eyes and pom-poms (inspired by this book), Toddler Approved

Hot Crayon Shaving Easter Eggs, Mama Smiles

26 Decorated Egg Ideas, Hands on as we Grow

Easy Spotty Eggs (egg decorating with Toddlers), Red Ted Art

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Plastic Egg Activities for Kids

Fancy Shaker Eggs (see photo above), Mama Smiles

ABC Egg Hunt, Toddler Approved

Crack Open the Egg and Paint, Teach Preschool

Easter Eggs: Not Just for Hunting, Creative Connections for Kids

Plastic Egg Ice Sculptures, Creativity my Passion

12 Ways to Learn, Using Plastic Easter Eggs, JDaniel4’s Mom

Make a Plastic Egg Pig Nose, Creativity My Passion

Glow in the Dark Eggs, Twins at Play

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Egg Games

Ice Eggs (See photo above), A Little Learning for Two

Easter Egg Number Hunt, A Mom with a Lesson Plan

Baby Play: Easter Egg Pick Up, Ready Set Read

Balancing Easter Eggs, A Mom with a Lesson Plan

Egg and Spoon Race, Creativity My Passion

Mexican Cascarones (Eggs filled with Confetti), Dirt and Boogers

Easter Egg Spelling Practice (see above), A Mom with a Lesson Plan

Egg Emotion Cards, Toddler Approved

Name Egg Hunt, Toddler Approved

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Egg Crafts

Eggshell Candles (See photo above), Paint Cut Paste

Decoupage Eggs, Pink and Green Mama

Easter Egg Sun Catchers, The Artful Parent

Spring in an Egg, Small and Friendly

How to make (egg-shaped) soap…for beginners, Red Ted Art

Felt Eggs, Sunny Side Up, Pink and Green Mama

Easter Garland with Foam Eggs, East Coast Mommy

Easter Grass Spring Garden, The Outlaw Mom

Egg Molds for Kids, Foodie Parent

Make a Sheep from a Plastic Egg, De tour et de rien

Giant Chocolate Egg, Mummy Mummy Mum

Easter Egg Cupcakes with Yolk Centers, Cupcake Project

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Egg Painting & Sculpture Activities

Egg Shell Sculpture (See photo above), Messy Kids

Make your own Egg Tempera Paint, Tinkerlab

Spray Painted Egg Bunting, Sun Hats and Wellie Boots

Tape Resist Eggs, Putti Prapancha

Rolling Eggs, Experimenting Mom

Easter Egg Made with Melted Beads, Sun Hats and Wellie Boots

Easter Shadow Box with Storytelling, Mommy Labs

Play Dough Easter Eggs, Putti Prapancha

60 Egg Activities for Kids | Crafts, Science Activities, Sculpture, and more | Tinkerlab.com

Egg Science Activities

The Transparent and Bouncy Egg Experiment (See photo above), The Chocolate Muffin Tree

Learning About Eggs, A Little Learning for Two

How Strong is an Eggshell?, Science Sparks

An Experiment with Egg and Soda, The Chocolate Muffin Tree

Egg Geodes, Tinkerlab

Walking on Raw Eggs, Tinkerlab

The Floating Egg-periment, Experimenting Mom

*******

Be sure to pin this page for future reference!

These are really easy, and will give the kids a lot of variety for easter. Egg Activities for Kids!

Join the TinkerLab Community

If you enjoyed this post, you might like to sign up for the weekly TinkerLab newsletter. It’s free and we often send exclusive content and opportunities that are only available to our subscribers.

In case you blinked and missed it, TinkerLab rounds up all the great stuff on the internets on keeping you and your critters creative and wraps it up for you in a tidy newsletter! (And throws in some secret giveaways for good measure!)  – Yuliya P., San Francisco, CA

Join our community and you’ll learn:

  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
  • How to make hands-on making a part of your everyday life
  • Easy, actionable ways to raise creative kids

TinkerLab Newsletter

Jellybean Matzo House

 This article was first shared in April 2011.

How to build a jellybean matzo house for Passover.

We had more than our fair share of Easter sweets this weekend, but I had a plan all along to purge our house of all that extra sugar by “gluing” it to some sort of base, like a paper plate, and calling it art.

As I talked to my almost three-year old about the idea, we mused over what we could glue our candy to. Something bigger than a cracker. Something flat. Something hard. Something we already had in our pantry.

And then it occurred to us — Matzo!

The irony of mixing Easter jellybeans with Passover matzo isn’t lost on me. As I laughed about this with my husband, we also realize that this is a fair representation of of our melting pot family. And I’m sure we’re not the only ones these ingredients on hand?!

What I especially love about this project, which looks oh-so-similar to the beloved gingerbread house, is the reminder that we can borrow ideas from other seasons. Here’s another seasonal mash-up from last summer: Easter in August.

How to build a matzo house

N started with some matzo and enjoyed breaking it into smithereens. She’s two, after all. Totally unusable for this project, but super fun.

If you’ve ever broken matzo with the intent of making neat little sandwich, you know that matzo has a mind of its own and can be completely unpredictable.

First, break your matzo…carefully

After accepting my fate that we would use uneven pieces, my husband messed around and came up with this strategy: Place the tip of a knife into the middle of the matzo, on the groove that you want to break…

And then press down.

It’s still a little wobbly, but it worked SO much better than my sad attempt at breaking them by hand.

I since found another strategy that sounds worthwhile: dip your finger in water and run it down the groove you intend to crack. It will soften the matzo just enough so that you can get a clean break.

Then we attached the pieces together with ornamental frosting, which dries hard. Our ornamental frosting was too runny for the job, but I’ll share the recipe below just in case you want it. Instead, I’d recommend the royal icing recipe that we used for our gingerbread houses.

Recipe for Royal Icing

Recommended

  • 1/8 cup Meringue Powder
  • 1/4 cup Cold Water
  • 2 cups sifted Confectioners Sugar

Add water to meringue powder and beat until soft peaks form. Add sugar into the mixture and beat until it’s the desired consistency. Add more sugar for stiffer icing.

Ornamental Frosting

Used in the pictures of this article

  • 4 cups powdered sugar (one box)
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 3 egg whites

Blend it together until smooth. If you’re not using the frosting right away, cover the top of your bowl with a damp towel to keep it moist.

We attached the “wall” pieces to a large matzoh base.

And then added jellybean decorations. That leaning wall is the result of one of my hand-breaking attempts. Sad. Looks like a foundation problem.

I finally conceded to the frosting-coated jellybean eating request. I can be tough!

We thought the white frosting made this was looking way to wintery, and not at all spring-like…

…so we colored our frosting green.

And then there was more…eating! It looked a bit like Roman ruins…

How to build a jellybean matzo house

So we added a roof. Voila! Jellybean Matzo House (with icicles) for Spring.

Resources

Do you have a good idea or tip for making candy houses?

This post was shared with Craft Schooling Sunday, Skip to my Lou, Sun Scholars

Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs

Have you ever thought about making vegetable dyed Easter eggs?

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets.

I’m trying to make a move away from synthetic food dyes and wanted to use natural, homemade dyes this year. Not only are these colors absolutely healthy for human consumption, but the process of making them is a wonderful lesson in creating art materials from scratch and can help children think critically about  how to achieve various colors colors.

As I was cutting the onions and beets I asked my daughter what colors she thought they’d make. I also asked questions like, “If I wanted to make blue dye, what might I make it with?”

She had fun making guesses based on what we had in our kitchen and garden, and also came up with her own wild suggestions such as, “let’s take the skins off the bananas to make yellow dye!”

How to Make Vegetable Dyed Easter Eggs

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets.

Supplies

  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Skin from one onion, two beets, large handful of spinach, half head of red cabbage
  • Vinegar
  • Water
  • Bowls
  • Ice cream scooper
  • Rubber Bands
  • Stickers
  • Crayons
  • Parsley Sprigs
  • Cheesecloth

Make the dye

I set up four pots of dye:

Pot #1: Onion Skins

Pot #2: Beets

Pot #3: Spinach

Pot #4: Chopped Red Cabbage

Add about 3 cups of water and 2 tablespoons of vinegar to each pot. The vinegar helps the dye set onto the egg.

Cook the dyes for about 30 minutes and then strained the colored water into some bowls.

*Note, you could also experiment with hard-boiling your raw eggs in the dye itself. I’ve heard this works really well. 

Three Decorating Techniques

While the dye cooks and cools, this could be a good time to get your eggs ready for dipping.

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets, and ideas on how to decorate them..

1. Wrap the Eggs with Rubberbands

We wrapped some eggs with rubber bands. Fine motor skill training for my almost 3-year old!

2. Cover Eggs with Stickers

We covered eggs with spring stickers and office stickers.

3. Color the Eggs with Crayons

And we drew on eggs with crayons. Nothing too crazy. The crayon will resist the dye. White crayon would make for more drama in the end, but my 2-year old had her heart set on blue.

How to Dye Easter Eggs

Some people like to use tongs or whisks to grab their eggs, but our ice cream scooper made for a good egg scooper.

Do you see that barely green water up there? That’s what transpired from cooking our spinach…for thirty minutes! Pale green water. As you can imagine, it didn’t do much to our eggs. Next time I think we’ll try using more spinach…or use green food coloring.

Have you had any success achieving a vibrant green color with natural dyes? I’ve heard that liquid chlorophyll is the best thing to use for green, but I haven’t tried it personally.

Pale Yellow from Onions

We unwrapped the eggs to reveal the hidden images!  This pale yellow color was made by the onion skins. We’ve also made yellow dye from ground turmeric (cooked the same as above), which it works really well.

Grey from Beets

It looks brown here, but the beets made a grey-ish color. Dye seeped into the openings of the bunny sticker, revealing a blotchy silhouette that’s still quite nice. A bunch of these all over an egg would be kind of cool, or a simpler sticker would look nice (scroll down for an example).

I’ve had success making a pale pink from beets, and I’m not quite sure what happened here.

Blue from Red Cabbage

But small stickers like this little butterfly left a clear impression. Lovely.

Brilliant blue came from the red cabbage! To make this egg, we wrapped cheesecloth around parsley sprigs and then dipped it in the cabbage dye. If you have pantyhose, that could work even better.

Hole Reinforcement Stickers on Easter Eggs

I found a new life for a stack of hole-punch reinforcement stickers! Don’t you love this? The grey color came from the beets (sad, because I was hoping for pink, but still beautiful), the egg in the back is a brown egg dipped in red cabbage dye, and the yellow egg is colored by onion skin.

Before tossing the cabbage leaves out, I wrapped them around an egg and popped it in the fridge overnight. Tie-dye egg!

For more ideas on how to make natural dyes, you’ll want to read this updated post: How to Make Natural Dye for Painting and Eggs.

More Egg Dying, Decorating, and Science Ideas

Three Easy Tricks for Blown Out Eggs

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

How to Make a Floating Egg

How to Walk on Raw Eggs. Really.

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Have you colored eggs with natural dye?

If you have, please share a tip, link, or photo!!

Spring Art: How to Make a Bunny Garland

Yesterday I shared how to make watercolor paintings with kids. And from those paintings, I cut out these cute little bunnies.

bunny garland

This was all my daughter’s idea.

She mapped out a plan for Spring decorating, and one of the things on her list was “a bunny garland, with bunnies that are the same shapes as the ones in in the mobile in your bedroom.” She tends to cut right to the chase.

spring art bunny garlandI asked for some advice here and on Facebook, on how we could turn our watercolor cut-outs into a garland, and you came back with some great ideas. Jen from the amazing blog, Paint Cut Paste, shared a Pinterest Board dedicated to all-things-garland, M Wall suggested that we use small clothespins, and Megan S. gave me the idea to add small paper clips and hang them from baker’s twine.

When I was out in the morning I did a quick hunt for tiny clothespins with no luck (that would have been cute, eh?), but I like how the colorful paperclips that I found ages ago at Daiso helped pull this together.

spring art bunny garlandI clipped them all up, leaving a few inches between bunnies, and then strung them in the garden.

The very windy garden.

And they lasted about three minutes before they were scattered all over the lawn and plants. Hmmm.

spring art bunny garlandSo we brought them inside where they’re safe and sound, helping us welcome Spring on this cool and windy Spring day.

To those of you who celebrate, Chag Pesach Sameach and Happy Easter!

 

How to Watercolor Bunnies with Kids

Watercolor is a medium that can be as demanding and temperamental as those who choose to paint with it. But it is a colorful and exciting medium all the same – well suited to describing the many moods of the subject, as well as those of the artist wielding the brush.

–Jean Burman

how to watercolor

Do your kids like to paint? Have you had success with watercolors? Traditional dry paint palettes of color are what most of us purchase for first watercolor experiments, but my go-to supply, and one of my favorite kid art supplies period, is liquid watercolor.

Watercolors are one of my favorite mediums to paint with, and somehow I forgot about that. I became an acrylic painter in high school, and then an oil painter after college. But the immediacy of watercolors — the flowing of colors from one into another and their quick-drying quality — makes it so appealing to the parent of young children who are equally quick and impatient.

I don’t have days to wait for paint to dry and I don’t have to worry myself over toxic paint stinking up my house. But watercolors are perfect and my kids adore them too.

how to watercolor with kidsTo set this up, I removed the usual plastic sheet that protects our art table and replaced it with red rosin paper. Red Rosin Paper is heavy sheathing paper usually used as a first step to cover new roofs, and you can find it in hardware stores. It comes on a huge roll, it’s economical, and it was perfect for absorbing the watercolor paint that didn’t make it onto the art paper.

Materials

  • Table cover
  • Watercolor Paper. This paper from Seth Cole is what we used. It’s 140 lb. (it’s thick and heavy = good), professional grade, acid-free, archival, and economical.
  • Liquid Watercolors. We like Sax Concentrated Liquid Watercolors from Amazon.
  • Assorted small paintbrushes (sable or synthetic fibers)
  • Container for watercolors — I like to use an ice cube tray. A styrofoam egg carton also works well.
  • Water cups or cans
  • Cloth or Paper towels

We filled our ice cube tray with every color we own (except black). I avoided black because if it’s not used with discretion it quickly muddles up all the colors. We talked about warm and cool colors, and divided our colors into these two camps: on one side there was red, orange, yellow, and sparkly red. The other side held lime green, turquoise, blue, sparkly blue, and violet.

Set up your towels next to the paint and brushes and use them to absorb extra water or paint of the brush.

how to watercolor with kids

I like to paint across from or next to my daughter because I find that her own ideas expand when she sees me work through my ideas. I never paint on her painting, but I may test some ideas out on my own paper that can help her come up with her own solutions.

We explored two kinds of watercolor painting: wet on dry and wet on wet. Wet on dry is the process of painting on dry paper. And wet on wet is the process of painting on wet paper. She painted a little wet on dry, and then I demonstrated wet on wet for her. She’s done this before, but seeing it again got her excited and she wanted to see the colors expand on her paper. You can see the wet on wet blue dots on the left side of her paper.

how to watercolor with kids

I also experimented with tapping the side of my wet, paint-loaded brush to create dots of paint all over my page, and she did the same. She loved this, actually, and thought it was hilarious when the paint splattered her face. Good lesson in paint control!

If you’re new to watercolor painting, it helps to talk with your child about gently dragging a loaded (full) brush against the edge of the paint container before painting. This helps keep paint puddles to a minimum and also teaches your child how to control the amount of paint that goes onto the paper. I wouldn’t worry about this too much with really young children, but be three or four, your child should be able to grasp this concept.

how to watercolor with kidsAll along, her plan was to make a bunny garland to hang in our window, so we let the paintings dry and I made  bunny template that she was happy with.

how to watercolor with kidsWe placed it over the paper to see how it might look. Love it!

how to watercolor with kidsAnd then I traced them on the back of the paper. The hardest part of this process was cutting the bunnies out. Not hard, exactly, but just to warn you, this step took a fair amount of time.

how to watercolor with kidsAnd there’s our first batch of bunnies, waiting to be strung up in the window.

I’m not sure exactly how we’ll hang them. Any ideas for us? I was thinking about gluing baker’s twine to the backs, but I’d like them to be somewhat archival so that we can use them year after year.

*************************

If you enjoy watercolor painting, you’ll want to bookmark Spiral Watercolor Streamer, Straw-blown Watercolor Painting,and Candle Wax Watercolor Resist and you will want to check out The Artful Parent’s great list of 11 Fun Watercolor Projects for Kids.

 

 

Eggs Dyed with Vegetables

I thought I’d wrap Egg Week up with a favorite egg project from last year: Decorating Eggs with Natural Dyes.

In case you’re just popping in, my friend Melissa over at The Chocolate Muffin Tree and I are posting unique egg-related activities or experiments each day this week, and here’s what we’ve covered so far:

There are so many fun commercial egg-dying products to choose from, and I love a box that promises technicolor tie-dye with coated glitter. My 3-year-old and I just tore through one of these and she had a great time with it. And did I mention that we’ve been eating eggs with all our meals this week? Small price to pay for some Egg Week fun.

If you have a little bit of time and an interest in introducing the magic of natural dyes to your child, this project is well worth your effort.

Click over here to find out what vegetable gave us this brilliant blue color!

naturally decorated eggs the chocolate muffin tree

And then check out The Chocolate Muffin Tree to see how she and her daughter made naturally dyed marbled eggs. They’re  beautiful, and the process will become one of your favorites, I’m sure.

egg week

So, although this marks the end of a very fun week of all-things-eggs, it’s not quite over yet…

I asked my creative and playful blog friends to share their own egg-related ideas and projects with me, and I’ve been overwhelmed with the response. I was planning to share them with you today, but there are so many ideas that I need a little time to pull it all together.

So, be sure to check back next week for one more day of eggs.

Until then, Happy Spring!

Walk on Eggs Science Project

Have you ever tried walking on raw eggs? I certainly had not, but this fun experiment inspired by this project at Steve Spangler Science gave us reason to give it a go.  I knew this was something my kids and I would enjoy. So I pinned it, and along with the pin I asked my readers if they would try this themselves.

What? Walk on Eggs?

I was floored by the number responses which ranged from “Do you know how much eggs cost?” to “That looks like a lot of fun!” What do you think? Would you try this? My husband went grocery shopping the other day, took a look at my list, and said, “What? Do you really need 6 dozen eggs?” I explained that yes, I really did need that many, but being an omelette/pancake/crepe-loving family, we’d be sure to eat every single one that wasn’t a science project casualty.

Walk on Eggs Science Project

As you’re getting ready for Passover or Easter, when you might actually have reason to buy 6 dozen eggs, keep this project in the back of your mind as a fun egg-stension into the sciences. This experiment fosters curiosity (what will happen if we walk on raw eggs?) and problem-solving skills (what’s the best way to walk on them so they don’t crack?), and would be appropriate for anyone older than three (although our 1.5-year old played with us and is still talking about it). standing on raw eggs

How to Walk on Eggs

To get us started, I took one package of eggs from the fridge and invited my 3-year old to stand on them. She wasn’t so sure about this. Understandable. She’s a pretty smart kid. The directions I read suggested walking on the shells barefoot. Presumably if you crack an egg and get egg guts all over your foot, it’s easier to clean. But 3-year old N insisted on keeping her socks on, and I respect that. egg walking demoOnce we mastered egg-standing, it was time for egg-walking. Oh-my-goodness, hold your breath. I showed N how to walk on the eggs with a flat foot, which helps distribute the pressure and keeps the eggs from cracking. If you place extra pressure or force on your heels or toes, an egg is bound to crack. We had the added benefit of using egg cartons with extra-high chipboard separators, which I think absorbed some of the pressure. I hadn’t even thought about getting specific kinds of egg cartons, and I wonder if the carton could make a difference. N did crack a couple eggs, and complained when her sock was full of goo, but overall it was a cool experiment. walking on raw eggsOf course, my one year old wanted to join the fun too. To make this work for her, I held her hands and a lot of her weight so she could take a stroll over the eggs. After Nutmeg cracked an egg with her heel, Rainbow kept saying “crack. egg. foot. trash.” And it made me wonder how an experience like this might affect her interpretation of the world. So, would you try this experiment with your kids?

More Egg Activities

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

Vegetable Dyed Easter Eggs

How to Blow out an Egg with Three Easy Tips

How to Make Natural Dyes for Painting and Eggs