Eggs Dyed with Vegetables

I thought I’d wrap Egg Week up with a favorite egg project from last year: Decorating Eggs with Natural Dyes.

In case you’re just popping in, my friend Melissa over at The Chocolate Muffin Tree and I are posting unique egg-related activities or experiments each day this week, and here’s what we’ve covered so far:

There are so many fun commercial egg-dying products to choose from, and I love a box that promises technicolor tie-dye with coated glitter. My 3-year-old and I just tore through one of these and she had a great time with it. And did I mention that we’ve been eating eggs with all our meals this week? Small price to pay for some Egg Week fun.

If you have a little bit of time and an interest in introducing the magic of natural dyes to your child, this project is well worth your effort.

Click over here to find out what vegetable gave us this brilliant blue color!

naturally decorated eggs the chocolate muffin tree

And then check out The Chocolate Muffin Tree to see how she and her daughter made naturally dyed marbled eggs. They’re  beautiful, and the process will become one of your favorites, I’m sure.

egg week

So, although this marks the end of a very fun week of all-things-eggs, it’s not quite over yet…

I asked my creative and playful blog friends to share their own egg-related ideas and projects with me, and I’ve been overwhelmed with the response. I was planning to share them with you today, but there are so many ideas that I need a little time to pull it all together.

So, be sure to check back next week for one more day of eggs.

Until then, Happy Spring!

Walk on Eggs Science Project

Have you ever tried walking on raw eggs? I certainly had not, but this fun experiment inspired by this project at Steve Spangler Science gave us reason to give it a go.  I knew this was something my kids and I would enjoy. So I pinned it, and along with the pin I asked my readers if they would try this themselves.

What? Walk on Eggs?

I was floored by the number responses which ranged from “Do you know how much eggs cost?” to “That looks like a lot of fun!” What do you think? Would you try this? My husband went grocery shopping the other day, took a look at my list, and said, “What? Do you really need 6 dozen eggs?” I explained that yes, I really did need that many, but being an omelette/pancake/crepe-loving family, we’d be sure to eat every single one that wasn’t a science project casualty.

Walk on Eggs Science Project

As you’re getting ready for Passover or Easter, when you might actually have reason to buy 6 dozen eggs, keep this project in the back of your mind as a fun egg-stension into the sciences. This experiment fosters curiosity (what will happen if we walk on raw eggs?) and problem-solving skills (what’s the best way to walk on them so they don’t crack?), and would be appropriate for anyone older than three (although our 1.5-year old played with us and is still talking about it). standing on raw eggs

How to Walk on Eggs

To get us started, I took one package of eggs from the fridge and invited my 3-year old to stand on them. She wasn’t so sure about this. Understandable. She’s a pretty smart kid. The directions I read suggested walking on the shells barefoot. Presumably if you crack an egg and get egg guts all over your foot, it’s easier to clean. But 3-year old N insisted on keeping her socks on, and I respect that. egg walking demoOnce we mastered egg-standing, it was time for egg-walking. Oh-my-goodness, hold your breath. I showed N how to walk on the eggs with a flat foot, which helps distribute the pressure and keeps the eggs from cracking. If you place extra pressure or force on your heels or toes, an egg is bound to crack. We had the added benefit of using egg cartons with extra-high chipboard separators, which I think absorbed some of the pressure. I hadn’t even thought about getting specific kinds of egg cartons, and I wonder if the carton could make a difference. N did crack a couple eggs, and complained when her sock was full of goo, but overall it was a cool experiment. walking on raw eggsOf course, my one year old wanted to join the fun too. To make this work for her, I held her hands and a lot of her weight so she could take a stroll over the eggs. After Nutmeg cracked an egg with her heel, Rainbow kept saying “crack. egg. foot. trash.” And it made me wonder how an experience like this might affect her interpretation of the world. So, would you try this experiment with your kids?

More Egg Activities

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

Vegetable Dyed Easter Eggs

How to Blow out an Egg with Three Easy Tips

How to Make Natural Dyes for Painting and Eggs

Land Art with Children

We were invited by Rashmie of Mommy Labs to join Forest Fiesta, an online celebration of World Environment Day (June 5) with her and about twenty other arts and education bloggers. This year’s host country was India, and Rashmie came up with the inspired idea to act as our Indian blogging host. Thanks, Rashmie! When you reach the end of this post, you can click around and see the forest creations made by my friends and their children from around the globe.

The theme of this year’s World Environment Day, sponsored by the United Nations Environment Program, is Forests. According to the UN, it’s the “most widely celebrated global day for positive environmental action.”

And with that, I’d like to share our positive environmental action with you…

Before heading out, we spent some time looking at pictures of inspirational land art, with a vague plan to make something monumental from nature.

It was a gorgeous, sunny day at a nearby farm that has a beautiful forest of trees and a creek that runs through it. I packed a little investigator bag for N, and she was delighted to find a magnifying glass in it. Aside from the photo, it didn’t get much real use, but it was a fun way to begin our adventure into the forest…

We took a hike through the trees and marveled at the patterns made by the sun and leaves.

Once we got into the forest, we noted the abundance of moss. Both of my kids loved feeling it’s texture. I adore the look of moss and lichen, so we brought a little bit home for this year’s fairy garden.

N spotted these colorful leaves caught by a log in the stream, and she asked me to take this picture.

We played with the creek’s current, and sent leaves and flowers down different parts of it, noting the various speeds at which the objects moved.

And then we stumbled upon the bridges! Forget nature for a minute — these bridges make LOUD sounds when you run across them! N took her shoes off, made herself right at home, and must have run across these bridges for almost an hour!

Meanwhile, Baby Rainbow enjoyed the experience of digging into the dirt and leaves. And this is when the abundance of leaves gave me this idea…

…to build a leaf path! Do you see it there? N was careful to walk around it as she exited the bridge.

She stopped periodically to help me gather yellow leaves and lay them down, but mostly she wanted to RUN! I think she’s a kinesthetic learnerWhat kind of learner do you think your child is?

When hikers approached to cross the bridge we’d sit down together and engage them in conversation or eavesdrop on their conversations, and this was where the fun came in.

A mother with two boys walked by, did a double take when she saw the path, and then stopped to take a photo of it. Her boys ran over and we overheard a loud, “cooooool.” (Score — I think we managed to execute a “positive environmental action”)! We chatted with a couple of women who asked us who made it. We did! And if we’d heard of the artist Andy Goldsworthy? We had, and he was actually our inspiration! They also mentioned that they were impressed with the scale of it, and never would have thought to stop and make something like this themselves. (Small children make us slow down and do crazy things, no?!).

N loved the interactions and attention that we brought to the environment and ourselves through this action, and it prompted her to make her own piece of land art…a circle!

If you’ve made land art or have a favorite link to share, I’d love to hear about it (and you can add a picture to your comment)! I was actually surprised that i didn’t find a lot of land art by kids online. Maybe this will be my next Creative Challenge?!


This post is shared with It’s Playtime


Creative Challenge #5: Plastic Bottles

Make something with Plastic Bottles

In honor of Earth Day, I’d like to raise a little awareness toward the enormous amounts of plastic bottles used around the world, coupled with some thoughts on recycling and upcycling those bottles into creative products. My family is hooked on bubbly water, and while the number of bottles we go through each week is staggering, each of these bottles gets recycled…and occasionally upcycled into art (our Recycled Sculpture project can be found here).

Sobering Statistics

The Challenge

Make something with plastic bottles! Have you cut the tops off to use them as funnels, added them to a marble run, used them as sand scoopers, or turned them into something surprising? The project should be executed by children, but adults are welcome to facilitate or collaborate if the mood strikes!

To join in

  • Use plastic bottles, along with any other materials of your choice.
  • Attach a link to your blog post, a YouTube video, or photo of the experiment along with a description of what you and/or your child/ren did in the comment section below.
  • There is no deadline for this project.


Instructions for adding an image file

  • Click on the “Choose File” button (below the “Submit” button)
  • Choose a JPEG file from your computer
  • Type in a description of your experiment into the comment text box
  • Click the “Submit Comment” button
  • Grab the Creative Challenge button and add it to your site, or copy this text into your HTML.
  • For more Creative Challengesclick here.

    How are you celebrating Earth Day?

Egg Dyeing Experiments

News break :) If you like TinkerLab, please click on over here and give us your vote.

We won’t win anything, but the attention sure is nice!



I’m excited to share my first inter-blog collaborative project. Are you ready?

Today I’m posting two Easter Egg projects in conjunction with Melissa of The Chocolate Muffin Tree.

After reading about last week’s Rolled Easter Egg Painting, Melissa suggested that we could have gotten extra mileage out of the project if we’d made it a two for one kind of thing. In case you missed it, N and I made paintings by rolling painted plastic Easter eggs all over pieces of paper. When the paintings were done I washed the eggs off, and Melissa’s idea is that we could have kept the eggs painted as decorative treasures. Of course! I loved this idea, so Melissa and I hatched a plan for today’s post: We would simultaneously experimented with Rolled Easter Egg Painting and we’d also share an idea for Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs. You can read my posts right here on TinkerLab, and Melissa’s are over here on her blog, The Chocolate Muffin Tree.

Dyed Egg Experiment #1: We made Rolled Wooden Eggs with wooden eggs, acrylic paint, and glitter. Click here for details.

Dyed Egg Experiment #2: We made Vegetable-dyed Easter Eggs from beets, cabbage, and onions, and used stickers, parsley, and rubber bands to add texture. Click here for more.

While Melissa and I worked with similar materials, our perspectives and those of our children are different, and we hope you’ll enjoy seeing how these experiments transpired in each of our homes.

If you’d like to join the collaboration and share your version of either egg-coloring process (or something entirely different!), you’re welcome to share a photo or link in the comments.

Rolled Wooden Eggs

This is part of a collaboration with my friend Melissa’s blog, The Chocolate Muffin Tree. Scroll to the bottom for a link to her Two for One: Rolled Eggs. Her colors are amazing!

We started with some wooden eggs. Aren’t they pretty?

What we used

  • Wooden Eggs
  • Acrylic Paint. Acrylics will stain clothes, walls, etc. Be sure to cover anything you wouldn’t want permanently painted!
  • Foil-lined bowl for the paint
  • Glitter
  • Container for rolling eggs in
  • Paper cut to fit in container
  • Tongs

N dipped the eggs in some paint, placed them in the container, and then rolled them around. She thinks glitter is almost as exciting as lollipops, and glitter was added liberally!

After rolling the eggs around, the papers took on a life of their own. N used A LOT of paint, which gave the paintings a rich, thick appearance.

And because we used wooden eggs, rather than the plastic ones we used last week, we now have some treasures to pull out and enjoy year after year.

If you’d like to see the other side of the wooden egg collaboration, visit Melissa at The Chocolate Muffin Tree to read about how she and her daughter painted their own wooden eggs.


Rolled Easter Egg Painting

When my daughter was about 2 1/2, her very favorite art activity was rolling paint-coated marbles all over sheets of paper. We made Rolling Rock Paintings with smooth rocks and Spooky Marble Spider Webs for Halloween. With Easter coming up, I was inspired to make something fun with the plastic eggs that consume dollar stores across the country. Not only is this fun to do, but the set up is easy and it’s a novel way to celebrate the spring season. On the developmental/arts experience level, kids will make choices about the colors they use, they will be active (standing and moving!), and they’ll learn how to manipulate the uneven balance of a rolling egg (as opposed to a more predictable rolling marble).


  • Easter eggs. I used plastic, but just about any eggs will do. If you can pry the chocolate ones away from your kids, more power to you!
  • Paint. Tempera or biocolors. Washable is always preferable!
  • Paper
  • Tray to hold the paper. We used a wooden tray, but I’ve also had great success with an open cardboard box.

Before we got to rolling, N wanted to dip half-eggs in the paint…

And print them.

Then she took a closed egg, rolled it in red and white paint (because her favorite color is pink, and she’s proud of her color-mixing knowledge!)…

…and then rolled it on the paper.

A few colors later!

So much fun. And clean up wasn’t too difficult — as long as you keep those eggs on the paper and in the tray!

What do you think?

This post is linked to It’s Playtime