TinkerLab http://tinkerlab.com Creative Experiments for Mini Makers Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:50:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 You Rock Valentines | Handmade, no-candy, eco-friendly, kids Valentines http://tinkerlab.com/you-rock-valentines-handmade-no-candy-eco-friendly-kids-valentines/ http://tinkerlab.com/you-rock-valentines-handmade-no-candy-eco-friendly-kids-valentines/#comments Fri, 12 Feb 2016 17:31:03 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21748 Make this easy and fun “You Rock” Valentine’s Day card from your rock collection. Today I’m joined by my childhood friend and communication strategist, Tenaya Wallace, who is sharing her eco-friendly pet rock Valentines, and her unique sense of humor. Welcome Tenaya! When my son was three I learned the importance of unique Valentines. Xan attended the […]

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Make this easy and fun “You Rock” Valentine’s Day card from your rock collection.

Today I’m joined by my childhood friend and communication strategist, Tenaya Wallace, who is sharing her eco-friendly pet rock Valentines, and her unique sense of humor. Welcome Tenaya!

U Rock Valentine's Day from Tenaya Hart

When my son was three I learned the importance of unique Valentines. Xan attended the most parent-involved co-op in the hippest hood in America (seriously, it was in Forbes) and we sent him to school with store-bought cards from the local CVS pharmacy. I think they were Sponge Bob-themed.

you rock valentine

What we received back, from every single kid, were hand-made Valentines, including a painted rock, that we still have. From that point on I made sure to never be outdone by these crafty moms of Silver Lake. But this year I ran out of ideas. My husband joked, “why don’t you paint rocks” and we laughed at the reminder of our store-bought ways.

The kids and I turned to Pinterest, searching “DIY no candy kids Valentines” (because candy is as passé as pre-fab cards). There were super-cute ideas but all involved little plastic toys and since I am 1) unemployed and don’t have spare change for plastic toys, 2) working under a tight deadline and don’t have time to order said toys and 3) a former environmental activist who should despise plastic toys, I decided to put in a search for “pet rocks.”

The results where mostly pictures of smooth round stones painted to look like sleeping cats, but there was one photo of a ragged little rock with googlie eyes glued on. The kids loved it. We were making pet rock Valentines rock googly eyes

My son collects rocks and keeps them in a box that doubles as an end table. He is possessive of his rocks, picked up on camping trips or walks around the block. But he saw wisdom in paring down his collection and actually got excited about using some of them for this year’s Valentines. Score for mom who has been trying to get rid of those rocks for years.

Make Pet Valentines with Rocks and Googly Eyes!

Step 1: Collect Rocks

We selected 38 rocks for Xan’s class (yes, 38…but that is another story) and 26 for my daughter’s. We washed them and set them in the sun to dry. The next day I took a quick trip to Jo-Ann’s Fabrics and spent $4 on googly eyes, which was more than I needed but I decided to get both the small eyes and the really small eyes just to get crazy.

When the kids got home from school I put out the rocks and eyes. They each selected rocks they liked and placed the eyes where they wanted them. I was shocked at how good they were at transforming little nuggets of nothing into personality-filled friends by just placing eyes in a certain place. This part of the process really let them be creative and made the project their own.

Step 2: Glue Down Googly Eyes

Glue Eyes to Rocks for Valentine's Day Cards: U Rock!

I glued the eyes on, because no mom needs to take their kid to urgent care for googlie eyes crazy-glued to fingers. The crazy glue worked like a charm on both porous and smooth rocks.

pet rocks

Because I am poor and lazy and a former environmentalist, I suggested to the kids that instead of putting the rocks on notecards, we could cut up cardboard boxes from the recycling bin. They loved the idea and thought I was a brilliant environmentalist, not poor or lazy in the least. My son even went out to our blue bin pull boxes and my daughter helped cut them up. They liked the idea of each card being different for each different rock. My only issue was that now some of the Silver Lake moms are going to know that my kids eat Honey Nut Cheerios and frozen pizza, but whatever.

Step 3: Attach to Cards

Valentine Cards with Rocks

Next I hot glued the rock to the cardboard. That way it will stay for now but can easily be pulled off later to keep as a pet forever. I did this step because again, no need for urgent care, but older kids who can be trusted with glue guns could totally do this on their own.

When I went to JoAnn’s I looked for stamp that said “You Rock” but they didn’t have one. I didn’t want to print “You Rock” on paper, because that started to defeat the eco-ness of the project and I didn’t want to argue with the kids about writing the cute catch-phrase 64 times. Once I glued the rock on the cardboard I realized they could just write “U” above it with the rock under. My daughter added an exclamation point with a heart on the bottom for added effect. Easy peasy.

Step 4: Write U *Rock*!

U Rock Valentine Card

So now we have 64 pet rocks and they are so fricking cute that I kind of want to keep them all. But we won’t. I will, however, be adding googly eyes and crazy glue to my camping kit so that whenever we are out in nature the kids can make some brand new eco-friendly friends. And I won’t be worried that my kids don’t have the coolest Valentines in town.

U Rock Valentine's Day Card

You Rock ValentinesEasy You Rock Valentine cards

More Valentine’s Day Ideas for Kids

30 Valentine Activities for Kids

Handmade Valentine’s Day Card: The Amazing All-in-one Envelope

Deconstructed Valentines for Toddlers

Self-serve Valentines Buffet

Heart Sewing Cards


Tenaya HartTo learn more about Tenaya, you can find her at Tenaya Speaks.

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Children must be taught how to think, not what to think. http://tinkerlab.com/children-must-be-taught-how-to-think-not-what-to-think/ http://tinkerlab.com/children-must-be-taught-how-to-think-not-what-to-think/#comments Thu, 28 Jan 2016 21:12:22 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21571 Children must be taught how to think, not what to think. -Margaret Mead I love this quote, don’t you? It reminds me of the old tale about how you can lead a horse to water but you can’t teach it to drink. Today I’m sharing a short roundup of some of my favorite TinkerLab posts […]

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Children must be taught how to think, not what to think. Margaret Mead

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.

-Margaret Mead

I love this quote, don’t you? It reminds me of the old tale about how you can lead a horse to water but you can’t teach it to drink. Today I’m sharing a short roundup of some of my favorite TinkerLab posts that talk about how we can encourage children to think for themselves, follow their own interests, and explore the ideas that inspire their curiosities.

Enjoy!

Rachelle

Eight Ways to Follow a Child’s Curiosities

Four Easy Steps to Follow a Child’s Interests

Documenting your child’s passions

How to be the “Guide on the Side”

Parents Reflect on What Art Education Means to Them

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The Snowball Maker and other Amazing Gadgets for Winter Fun http://tinkerlab.com/the-snowball-maker-and-other-amazing-gadgets-for-winter-fun/ http://tinkerlab.com/the-snowball-maker-and-other-amazing-gadgets-for-winter-fun/#respond Tue, 19 Jan 2016 18:39:10 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21470 This weekend we went to the snow and had a great time building a snowman (snow person — what do you call it?), sledding, and drinking cocoa by the fire. We even got all geared up to ski, made it to the lodge for more cocoa, and were sent right back down the mountain because […]

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I love this snowball maker! The amazing snowball maker and other gadgets for winter fun.

This weekend we went to the snow and had a great time building a snowman (snow person — what do you call it?), sledding, and drinking cocoa by the fire. We even got all geared up to ski, made it to the lodge for more cocoa, and were sent right back down the mountain because the winds made it too dangerous to safely leave the mountain later in the day. Thankfully my kids were zen with this, we still enjoyed an amazing view from the gondola (I shared this picture on Instagram – the view is stunning!), and sat around the fire where we played card games and made the best out of it.

While we were in the snow, which is a real novelty for us valley-based Californians, my eyes were opened to a whole new world of snow toys and snowball making inventions that you will love if you’re not already initiated.

First up: The Snowball Maker

Snowball Maker

So, you know how your mitten soaks through after making too many snowballs? And the problem with making snowballs that are too hard, and can whack someone in the head? This toy is a solution to these snowball follies!

They are such a great deal and a ridiculously fun toy, that I’m making this the featured maker supply. You can see the last featured supply here. You can easily find these in toy stores, shops like Walmart, hardware stores, and grocery stores in snowy places. And they also sell them on Amazon for around $5.

snowball maker invention

 

snowball maker

Snowman Kit

When it comes to snowmen, snowdogs, snowcats, and snowpeople, my kids like to forage for rocks and sticks, found objects, and pinecones to make it all come together. However, for a readymade snowman experience, there is a snowman kit that includes all the pieces you’ll need, including a hat you can stake down that won’t fly away.

Kid made snowman

Make a snowman kit

 

Snow Block Mold

Make your own igloos and forts with this easy to use snow block mold. If you have a few snowball makers (above), you might need a few of these to build forts and and protect yourselves during a snowball fight. All in good, wintery fun, of course.

Great for all seasons of snow and sand play: a Snow block mold, that can also be a sand block mold.

 

Snowfling

We saw people with these and thought they were using dog ball throwers, but it turns out that these are a snow product called Snowflings, and they’re designed to help kids (and grownups) throw snowballs far. This one gets great reviews and I like how the reviewers describe that it makes snowball fights more fair for those with worse aim trouble launching snowballs great distances. It seems these would be great for kid vs. grownup snowball fights.

Snowfling - amazing contraption for tossing snowballs

That’s all for now. Although it’s raining, pouring, dumping, I’m happy to be back home and look forward to our next snow adventure.

Until next time, Rachelle

Dotted Line

 

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How to Draw a Kawaii Penguin http://tinkerlab.com/how-to-draw-a-cute-penguin/ http://tinkerlab.com/how-to-draw-a-cute-penguin/#comments Wed, 06 Jan 2016 15:09:20 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21388 I will be the first to admit that I love cute things, and that passion has been passed down to my children who are obsessed with Japanese cartoons, Kawaii characters, Shopkins, and manga. Rather than run from this passion I decided to embrace it, and bring you what I hope is the first of a […]

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How to draw a cute Kawaii Penguin.

I will be the first to admit that I love cute things, and that passion has been passed down to my children who are obsessed with Japanese cartoons, Kawaii characters, Shopkins, and manga. Rather than run from this passion I decided to embrace it, and bring you what I hope is the first of a series of How to Draw a Kawaii…

And we’re kicking it off today with How to Draw a Kawaii Penguin.

To make this easier for you, I created a free printable, and there’s a link to it at the end of this post.

How to Draw a Kawaii Penguin

How to draw a cute penguin with kids

One of the things I care most about as an arts educator is encouraging and supporting individual expression and ideas in art making. Prescriptive, how-to tutorials concern me as I worry about children taking them too literally.

This process, however, should be seen as an inspirational foundation or starting point from which to build personal and unique ideas. I gave the sheet to my five-year old tester, and you can see that she took it into completely original territory.

How to draw a cute penguin with kids

How to draw a cute penguin with kids

How to Draw a Kawaii Penguin

Kawaii (pronounced Hawaii) is the Japanese word for cute, lovable, and adorable. Interestingly, the word’s original meaning described someone who was blushing from embarrassment.

But for today’s purpose, we’ll go with cute and lovable. Well, that penguin below may  be blushing…

How to draw a cute penguin with kids

The penguin is drawn in six easy steps.

Once you’re done, feel free to add your own ideas, backgrounds, textures, and props.

free printable: How to draw a cute penguin

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James Bond, Scientist and Secret Agent | The Maker’s Almanac http://tinkerlab.com/james-bond-scientist-and-secret-agent-the-makers-almanac/ http://tinkerlab.com/james-bond-scientist-and-secret-agent-the-makers-almanac/#respond Mon, 04 Jan 2016 14:35:34 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21335 I’m introducing a new project today called The New Maker’s Almanac. Taking inspiration from The Old Farmer’s Almanac, a favorite of mine, this project will highlight important and interesting days on the maker calendar, sharing bits of inspiration from the arts and sciences. My hope is to share a quick, weekly dose of Maker Inspiration, and today […]

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The New Maker's Almanac TinkerLab

I’m introducing a new project today called The New Maker’s Almanac. Taking inspiration from The Old Farmer’s Almanac, a favorite of mine, this project will highlight important and interesting days on the maker calendar, sharing bits of inspiration from the arts and sciences.

My hope is to share a quick, weekly dose of Maker Inspiration, and today I have a fun story for you about the origin of James Bond’s name.

Did you know that James Bond was a scientist?

I especially love how this is about a scientist and author – a perfect mashup of the arts and sciences.

a little history…

My great uncle Hal lived in the town of Glendale, CA where he was both the Postmaster General and a serious urban farmer. After an afternoon in his vegetable garden, I would read the almanac while he chewed on a pipe as he challenged my dad to a game of chess. I later fell in love with the Farmer’s Almanac all over again when I met my husband’s grandfather who wrote stories for it. His writing was witty, just like him, and he sprinkled every story with advice for living a good life.

For example:

Lawrence Doorley III Farmer's Almanac

But I digress.

Did you know that James Bond was a scientist?| The New Maker's Almanac

the original james bond, scientist

Today is the birthday of the original James Bond, born January 4, 1900.

Bond was an ornithologist who wrote Birds of the West Indies (affiliate) in 1936. Born in Philadelphia and educated in England, Bond was a dissatisfied banker. With an interest in natural history, he took a position on an Amazon expedition and soon left the world of banking behind for a future in ornithology, He became an expert on birds of the Caribbean and took a position as Curator of Ornithology at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia.

the fictional james bond, secret agent

Ian Fleming, well known as the mind behind the James Bond movies, was living in Jamaica where he wrote Casino Royal in 1952. Fleming was a amateur bird watcher and had a copy of Bond’s Birds of West Indies on his shelf. Searching for a name for his leading character, he borrowed Bond’s moniker. Says Fleming in a note to the original Bond’s wife, Mary:

“It struck me that this brief, unromantic, Anglo-Saxon and yet very masculine name was just what I needed, and so a second James Bond was born.”

Apparently, the real Bond had no idea that his name had gained so much popularity until a revised edition of Bird’s of West Indies appeared in the paper along with references to espionage. (Source: Caribbean Beat). 

In response to a complaint from the author’s wife, Fleming said:

“I must confess that your husband has every reason to sue me…In return, I can only offer your James Bond unlimited use of the name Ian Fleming for any purpose he may think fit…Perhaps one day your husband will discover a particularly horrible species of bird which he would like to christen in an insulting fashion by calling it Ian Fleming.”

And that, my friends, is the story of how the fictional James Bond’s name came to be.

Until next time, Rachelle

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New Year’s Eve Activities for Kids http://tinkerlab.com/new-years-eve-activities-for-kids/ http://tinkerlab.com/new-years-eve-activities-for-kids/#comments Fri, 25 Dec 2015 06:06:57 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21181 New Year’s Eve gives us the opportunity to ring in the new year with confetti, wear silly hats, and drink fizzy things. And it can also be a fun time celebrate with kids since we all enjoy getting into the spirit of making noisemakers, counting down to midnight, crafting, and reflecting on the year that passed. I […]

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New Year's Eve Crafts and Activities for Kids

New Year’s Eve gives us the opportunity to ring in the new year with confetti, wear silly hats, and drink fizzy things. And it can also be a fun time celebrate with kids since we all enjoy getting into the spirit of making noisemakers, counting down to midnight, crafting, and reflecting on the year that passed.

I also love the fresh start of a new year that can open us up to setting intentions. If you’re looking for something along those lines, be sure to check out our popular posts: 8 Ideas to Kick-start a Creative New Year and 5 Resolutions for a Creative New Year.

 

Included in this comprehensive list:

  • New Year’s Eve art and science activities
  • Counting down to the new year with kids
  • New Year’s Scavenger Hunt Ideas
  • Kid’s Party Hats for the New Year
  • Making New Year’s Noisemakers
  • Reflections on Last Year
  • Setting New Year Goals with Kids

 fun new year activities kids

Art and Science Activities

Set up a Fizzy Science Party, Little Bins for Little Hands

Make up a batch of sparkly, fizzy concoctions with baking soda and vinegar.

Paper Cup Party Popper, Red Ted Art

This is a super quick craft (maybe 5 minutes) that can bring hours of fun

New Year’s Eve Playdough, Homegrown Friends

Make up a batch of glittery play dough. And if you love playdough, check out TinkerLab’s best playdough recipe.

Science for Kids: Fireworks in a Glass, Science Sparks

This is totally safe, very easy and looks just like a firework without the bang and sparkle.

New Year’s Eve Party Masks, Green Owl Art

Make these easy Mardi Gras-style masks with paper, tape, and craft sticks.

DIY Glitter Celebration Wands, Hello Wonderful

Cute celebration glitter wands you can make to ring in the new year with the kids.

Colorful Confetti Popper, Mama Miss

This is not for the glitter-phobes, but it IS a lot of fun.

Countdown to the New Year

New Year’s Eve Bingo, Playdough to Plato

Check these items off the Bingo chart as you see them during the night’s festivities.

New Year’s Eve Countdown Chain, Sugar Aunts

Make a New Year’s resolution, Play charades, have a Dance party. Tear off a chain on the hour for each of the hours leading up to midnight (or “midnight”).

New Year’s Eve Countdown Clock, Buggy and Buddy

Make this craft from a plate and sticky numbers. Decorate at will and then use it to help you countdown the hours until midnight.

New year's scavenger hunts

New Year’s Scavenger Hunt Ideas

Memory Scavenger Hunt, No Time for flash Cards

This is fun way to take a family trip down memory lane. Create a photo card for each month of the previous year. Hide them around the home. After finding them all, sort them by month and reflect on the memories.

New Year’s Eve Scavenger Hunt, Buggy and Buddy

Similar to the Bingo game (above), how many of these NYE symbols can you find? Free download.

Kids Party Hats for the New Year

New Year’s Eve Party Hats, Tot Schooling

Print out this free printable, and then invite your child to decorate and color on the hat.

New Year’s Party Hat, See Vanessa Craft

These are elegant, and kids can cut the message out and help assemble them.

Watercolor Party Hats, Modern Parents Messy Kids

These would be fun to make with the kids, and oh-my-goodness, check out the cute dog wearing a party hat!

Making New Year’s Noisemakers

New Year’s Eve Party Horn, Pink Stripey Socks

These hilarious party horns are made to look like you’re blowing out of a gigantic mouth. So funny.

New Year’s Eve Noisemakers, Teaching Mama

Make this easy noisemaker from paper plates and confetti.

Wishing Spin Drums, No Time for Flashcards

These cool noisemakers and so unique, and if you use pre-made spin drums, they’re extra easy.

New year's goal setting kids

Looking Back: Reflections on the Past Year

New Year’s Family Interview, Teach Mama

Interview each other about favorite memories from the year.

Make a Time Capsule, Red Ted Art

Fill a jar with hand-written memories from the previous year.

New Year’s Tic Tac Toe, Carrots are Orange

This simple game is one that brings reflection, discussion, laughter, and even a bit of learning.

Looking forward: Setting New Year Goals with Kids

8 Ideas to Kick-Start Creativity in the New Year, TinkerLab

These are some of my favorite ways to bring creativity into your life in the new year.

5 Resolutions that fuel creativity, TinkerLab

This is the post that prompted the “8 idea” post (above). I think you’ll love it.

Free New Year’s Resolution Printable, Modern Parents Messy Kids

I love how simple this easy family resolution printable is. It invites you to reflect on the past year and think about the next year.

Resolutions with Kids: Word of the Year, NurtureStore

Combining art with good intentions, you can create Words of the Year.

Make a Wishing Wall, Buggy and Buddy

Dream up wishes for the new year, write them down, and add them to a wall filled with family wishes.

Make a Blessings Box, The Iowa Farmer’s Wife

Each night before bed write down a blessing and place it in the box.

Painting Fortune Cookies, No Time for Flashcards

Use food coloring to decorate a batch of fortune cookies. Open in the new year to find your fortune.

Help your child set goals for the New Year, Inner Child Fun

New Year’s resolutions are not just for the grownups! Kids benefit greatly from setting, working towards and achieving their own New Year’s goals. Big or small!

Make a Wishing Star Bank, Hello Wonderful

Make this bank from cardboard and paint (so adorable) and fill it with wishes for the new year.

More New Year’s Inspiration

8 Ideas to Kick-Start Creativity in the New Year | TinkerLab.comCreative New Year's resolutions

8 Ideas to Kick-Start Creativity in the New Year

5 Resolutions for  Creative New Year

New Years Eve Pinterest

Follow my New Year’s Eve Board on Pinterest

 

The best ideas for new year's eve activities for kids - so good!

 

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Powdered Milk Paint Recipe for Kids http://tinkerlab.com/powdered-milk-paint-recipe-for-kids/ http://tinkerlab.com/powdered-milk-paint-recipe-for-kids/#comments Sat, 19 Dec 2015 01:27:09 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21149 Homemade paints are awesome and this Powdered Milk Paint Recipe is gorgeous for kid-made paintings.  Why you’ll love it: The paint is easy to make, teaches children to be resourceful makers, the consistency is similar to tempera paint, and it’s inexpensive.  Ingredients: Powdered Milk Paint Recipe Note: This contains affiliate links 2 parts powdered milk 1 […]

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Powdered Milk Paint Recipe | TinkerLab

Homemade paints are awesome and this Powdered Milk Paint Recipe is gorgeous for kid-made paintings. 

Why you’ll love it:

The paint is easy to make, teaches children to be resourceful makers, the consistency is similar to tempera paint, and it’s inexpensive. 

Homemade milk paint with powdered milk | TinkerLab

Ingredients: Powdered Milk Paint Recipe

Note: This contains affiliate links

How to make dry milk paint | TinkerLab

Directions

Mix all the ingredients together in a small bowl

Add food coloring or liquid watercolors until you have the right intensity

Paint!

The paint’s consistency is similar to tempera paint. Use it on card stock paper or cardboard for the best results.

I’ve had people ask me if there’s a milky smell to this paint, but that hasn’t been my experience. And once the paint dries you can’t smell it at all.

 Make your own milk paint with kids | TinkerLab

Shelf Life

Cover and store in the fridge for up to 4 days.

 

How to make your own powdered milk paint | TinkerLab

More Homemade Paint Recipes

Puffy Sparkle Paint: Made from salt, flour, and water. My most popular paint recipe.

Sweetened Condensed Milk Paint: This sticky paint dries with a beautiful sheen.

Invisible Ink: Made from citrus juice, use this with little detectives.

Bubble Paint: A mixture of dish soap, water, and tempera paint, blow bubbles directly into the paint and then make gorgeous prints.

Finger Paint: A simple recipe of flour and water, heated over the stove, this goopy paint feels great on the hands.

Egg Tempera Paint: This very easy paint, made from egg yolks, dries with a beautiful sheen and can teach kids about how Renaissance artists painted.

Microwave Puffy Paint: Squeeze this paint onto paper and then pop the artwork in the microwave for a puffy result.

Pin it!

Make your own paint with powdered milk and water | TinkerLab

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The Curious Kids’ Science Book http://tinkerlab.com/the-curious-kids-science-book/ http://tinkerlab.com/the-curious-kids-science-book/#comments Thu, 17 Dec 2015 00:35:56 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21137 Note: This post contains affiliate links My friend, Asia Citro, author of 150+ Screen-Free Activities for Kids, has released a new book: The Curious Kids’ Science Book: 100+ Creative Hands-on Activities for Ages 4-8. And it’s wonderful! The book is filled with all sorts of science projects that cover topics from environmental science to living things, […]

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The curious kids' science book creative hands-on activities | TinkerLab

Note: This post contains affiliate links

My friend, Asia Citro, author of 150+ Screen-Free Activities for Kids, has released a new book: The Curious Kids’ Science Book: 100+ Creative Hands-on Activities for Ages 4-8.

And it’s wonderful!

The book is filled with all sorts of science projects that cover topics from environmental science to living things, and then there’s my favorite section that gets into making and tinkering: Engineering.

When I opened the book I was tickled to see that her daughter set up her ramp-building project on a pile of books, and the TinkerLab Book is smack-dab in the middle of the pile!

Who the Book is For

If you’re a parent who’s looking for hands-on creative activities, have a young child who’s curious about how the world works, or want to raise your child to think like a scientist, this book is for you!

The curious kids' science book creative hands-on activities

When I opened the book I was tickled to see that her daughter set up her ramp-building project on a pile of books, and the TinkerLab Book is smack-dab in the middle of the pile!

The Curious Kids’ Science Book does a wonderful job encouraging children to really think like scientists through the processes of making guesses, testing hypothesis, iteration, and experimentation.

Endorsements

I was lucky enough to see it ahead of its release when Asia asked me if I would write a blurb about. It’s so well executed and I couldn’t refuse. Here are my thoughts:

“Asia Citro is a welcome new voice in the world of science education. As an educator and mother of two young children, she has a deep understanding that children are naturally curious, ask good questions, and freely investigate the world around them when given the chance. What The Curious Kid’s Science Book does so well, which so many science books for kids tend to miss, is the celebration of this innate curiosity and penchant for experimentation. With this understanding in hand, this book encourages children not to replicate tried and true science projects, but to ask their own questions and think like real scientists! From building a hypothesis to testing out theories, The Curious Kid’s Science Book will harness the scientist inside children and their adult counterparts. Bravo!”

I loved reading this endorsement from a former NASA astronaut:

“Perhaps children are the best scientists and explorers because they aren’t afraid to ask the question ‘Why?’ I encourage you to use the easy-to-do hands-on activities in this book to fuel your children’s innate creativity and problem-solving skills. Plus, without knowing it, they’ll have fun learning science and math!”

—Captain Wendy Lawrence
Former NASA astronaut

To learn more about this 5-star book (it’s killing it on Amazon), click here.

Try an Activity from the Book

There’s a meaty engineering chapter in The Curious Kids’ Science Book, and we tried the project on page 123: Design a Straw Plane and Change the Parts to Change How it Flies.

If you’d like to see how you, too can make straw and paper airplanes, click here.

How to make a straw airplane | TinkerLab

More from author, Asia Citro

And if you’d like to see my review of 150+ Screen-free Activities for Kids, click here.150 screen free book shot

 

 

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Design Challenge: Make Straw and Paper Airplanes http://tinkerlab.com/design-challenge-make-straw-and-paper-airplanes/ http://tinkerlab.com/design-challenge-make-straw-and-paper-airplanes/#comments Wed, 16 Dec 2015 20:11:44 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21120 We love engineering projects and my kids make their fair share of paper airplanes. This is a fun twist on the paper airplane, and I’ll show you how to make straw and paper airplanes. I was amazed at just how far this simple contraption could go! I’ve been wanting to make one of these for a while, […]

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How to  make a straw airplane | TinkerLab

We love engineering projects and my kids make their fair share of paper airplanes. This is a fun twist on the paper airplane, and I’ll show you how to make straw and paper airplanes.

I was amazed at just how far this simple contraption could go!

I’ve been wanting to make one of these for a while, and then along came Asia Citro’s newest book, The Curious Kids’ Science Book: 100+ Creative Hands-on Activities for Ages 4-8. (affiliate). 

The curious kids' science book creative hands-on activities | TinkerLab

Note: This post may contain affiliate links.

And wouldn’t you know, right there on page 123 is a project called Design a Straw Plane and Change the Parts to Change how it Flies.

Yes!

If you enjoyed my book or have a curious and creative child between the ages of 4 and 8, The Curious Kids’ Science Book is just for you.

Supplies: Make Straw and Paper Airplanes

  • Cardstock paper
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Straw

How to  make a straw and paper plane  | TinkerLab

Directions: Make a Straw and Paper Plane

  • You will need two pieces of paper for this activity: one will be half the length of the other
  • Cut two strips off the end off a sheet of paper that are approximately 1″ wide.
  • Cut one of the strips in half
  • You will now use two pieces of paper: The long one and one of the short ones. Ours measured at roughly 1″ x 8.5″ and 1″ x 4.25″. This does not have to be precise.
  • Tape the paper strips into loops
  • Tape the loops to either end of a straw, making sure that they are facing the same direction.
  • Fly your plane.

Extensions and Design Challenges

  • Try using different lengths of paper
  • Use different weights of paper
  • Move the paper closer to the center of the straw
  • Measure how far your plane can travel
  • Make a paper airplane and compare the distances traveled
  • If you enjoy making things that fly, try making a flying teabag hot air balloon.

Supplies for making a straw and paper plane  | TinkerLab

Pin it!Arrow

These go so far. And they're easy! How to make a straw and paper plane that flies far | TinkerLab

More Design + Engineering Projects

Try the Flying Tea Bag Hot Air Balloon

Flying tea bag hotair balloon experiment| Kid Science

Make Paper Airplanes (that go far)

How to make paper airplanes that go far square

Make Straw Rockets

Straw Air Rockets

Build a Marble Run

Easy DIY Marble Run that helps children practice problem solving and develop creative thinking skills | TinkerLab.com

 

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Caramel Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe http://tinkerlab.com/caramel-chocolate-pecan-turtle-recipe/ http://tinkerlab.com/caramel-chocolate-pecan-turtle-recipe/#comments Tue, 15 Dec 2015 20:01:10 +0000 http://tinkerlab.com/?p=21100 This Caramel Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe is so simple that children can help make it (mine did) and it’s absolutely delicious. Kid-friendly and a crowd-pleaser! Caramel Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe These Pecan Chocolate Turtles are beyond easy to make and I was able to make it WITH my kids. So much fun, and everyone thought they […]

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This Caramel Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe is so simple that children can help make it (mine did) and it’s absolutely delicious.

Kid-friendly and a crowd-pleaser!

Caramel Chocolate Rolo Turtle Recipe

Caramel Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe

These Pecan Chocolate Turtles are beyond easy to make and I was able to make it WITH my kids. So much fun, and everyone thought they were delicious.

When I first made these, my one year old exercised fine motor skills by unwrapping the candies, while my 3 year old placed them on the pretzels. It was assembly-line cooking at its finest!

These delicious candies won’t disappoint you, I promise!

Ingredients

  • Mini Pretzels
  • Chocolate-covered caramel candy such as Rolos
  • Candied Pecan Halves (or regular pecan halves)

NOTES

If you don’t have candied pecans, try substituting M + M’s, cashews, salted pecans, etc.

*Inspired by this recipe

These are crazy good and so easy to make. Everyone loves them. Caramel Chocolate Rolo Turtle Recipe | TinkerLab

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 300 F

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper

Arrange pretzels on the sheet

Place a caramel chocolates on top of each pretzel

Bake for 4 minutes

Remove from the oven and gently press a pecan half on top of the warm chocolate

Cool and enjoy. To expedite cooling, you can put these in the fridge for a short time.

If you’re gifting these, package in waxed paper or cellophane.

Pretzel Turtles are so easy to make! They could be used for Christmas gifts and wrapped in wax paper or cellophane.!

Chocolate Pecan Turtle Recipe

When ours finally cooled I wrapped them up in wax paper and sealed them with a sticker.

diy gifts with kids

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