How to Blow Out an Egg with 3 Easy Tricks

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Could you use some tips on how to blow out an egg and clean eggs for decorating? Hopefully, this will help you get started!

How to Blow Out Eggs with 3 Easy Tricks | TinkerLab

Today I’m excited to share three little tricks for simplifying blown-out eggs. Messy fun, right? If you’re a traditionalist, you might want to stop reading here. Otherwise, read on…

How to Blow out an Egg

Trick #1: Hand Drill

How to blow out an egg | TinkerLab

So, if you wanted a hollow egg, and were to puncture it in the traditional way, you might use a needle or a special egg-piercing tool like this.

But, if you’re running short on time or if you know your kids will be giddy at the site of a hand drill (do you see me raising my hand?), you could do what we did.

My Fiskateer friend, Angela (read my interview with Angela here), sent me this awesome little Fiskars hand-cranked drill that’s perfect for preschool hands. My kids (ages 4 and 2) didn’t drill the eggs, but I do recommend the drill if you’re looking for a beginner’s wood-working drill for older children.

I carefully drilled a hole in the top and bottom of the egg, and then blew the eggs out.

But that blowing business is an awful lot of work, which brings me to trick #2…

Trick #2: Baby Aspirator

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

If you have little kids in your house, chances are good that you have at least one of these lying around. Between my two kids and overly generous L & D nurses, we own about eight of these.

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

Yes please!!

As much as I like my tools, I also believe in tradition. When your kids are old enough to blow out an egg with their own lungs, this post from The Artful Parent will inspire you to help them give it a go.

Trick #3: A Box and Skewers

Once your eggs are blown out, you’ll want to decorate them.

The girls and I painted a few of our blown eggs with acrylic paint, and we used little espresso cups to keep our hands clean while also keeping the eggs from wobbling around the table.

This plan was moderately successful.

It worked beautifully for painting the top half of the egg, but as soon as you were ready to paint the other side there was the challenge of flipping the egg without ruining our work. Not to mention all that acrylic paint that crusted up on my cute mugs. Ugh.

blown eggs on skewer in box

Which is where this nifty idea comes in handy: Cut a few grooves into the edge of a box, push a skewer through your egg (you might have to make your holes a wee bit bigger to do this), and voila!

I can’t remember where I first saw this, but here are a few other folks that have tried this smart idea: Melissa at Chasing Cheerios used this technique to paint chalkboard and decoupaged eggs. And the Sydney Powerhouse Museum replaced the box with Tupperware, and then made charming hanging eggs.

How to Blow Out an Egg | TinkerLab

Are any of these tricks new-to-you? I love learning new tricks…do you have another egg-decorating tip to share?

It’s Day #3 of Egg Week. In case you’re just popping in, my talented friend Melissa over at The Chocolate Muffin Tree and I are posting unique egg-related activities or experiments each day this week.

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In case you missed our earlier posts, here’s what we’ve covered this week so far:

Kiwi Crate: Hands-on Projects Delivered to Your Home

Kiwi Crate Review spinning tops

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Have you heard of Kiwi Crate? I’ve had the pleasure of knowing this smart, forward-thinking start-up since its early days, and I can’t tell you how proud I am to be associated with them.

I’m a DIY-kind-of-gal, but I also recognize that a lot of my readers don’t have the time to make everything from scratch. And that’s where Kiwi Crate comes in. For $19.95/month, Kiwi Crate delivers a set of thematic hands-on projects (ages 3-6) that even I can’t help but swoon over.

When the charming + thoughtfully packaged crate arrived, N was eager to dig in to all of the three projects. At once. And it took everything in me to curb her enthusiasm and slowly work our way through the crate.

The crate I’m sharing today happens to be about color, but the variety of themes will keep you and your kids interested as they vary each month from Dinosaurs to Outer Space (see this beautifully photographed review for a peek at both) to Gardening. Fun!

As someone who once wrote and designed lesson plans for art museums, I’m impressed with how Kiwi Crate has designed their packaging. The instructions are simple, clear, and well-illustrated, and the materials are wrapped up beautifully like a box of gifts. Since N was beyond excited to open the box and wanted to get started right away, I guess that says it all.

Project #1: sun catchers with colorful transparent plastic.

Sun catchers were already a popular activity in our home, but Kiwi Crate took it to another level with pre-cut mat board frames and contact paper, cut-to-size. The set-up was easy, clean up was a snap, and once N was done her sun catchers were ready to display. She enjoyed propping up and admiring her handiwork as we worked on another project.

Project #2: Color-mixing spinners.

The spinners they included are made of wood and far more beautiful than anything I’ve been able to find.  They included pre-cut circular paper discs and a full marker set for her to decorate.

Her spinners, ready to go!

Color mixing at work! This was by far my daughter’s favorite project.

Project #3: Bleeding tissue paper bag

While N’s excitement for the crate could have blown through all the projects in one sitting, I saved this for another day. This sweet little kid-sized cotton tote came as a bonus project. The instructions asked us to soak it in water, lay squares of pre-cut bleeding tissue paper on the bag, and add more water to transfer the ink from the tissues to the bag. We let it dry overnight, and had a nice little tote bag for storing our park snacks in. A couple weeks after making this, I had an event at Kiwi Crate. N ran to get the bag, telling me that I had to carry my wallet and keys in it so they could see how we made it. Awwww. They were impressed.

If you’re looking for an experience-based, process-oriented gift for a child in your life, or thoughtfully curated projects that can save you planning time, Kiwi Crate subscriptions are 3, 6, or 12 months and shipping is free. And I just noticed that if you sign up for a year, you get one month free!

Kiwi Crate also has a Blog and a Facebook page that are both worth following for more good ideas and company updates.

What themes would you like to see in a Kiwi Crate? Could you go for a little Kiwi Crate magic?

Note: I’ve been an advisor to Kiwi Crate since May 2011.

Fridge Box Imaginative Play

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We got a new fridge (!!), and while I’m thrilled with the new appliance, I have to admit that I was almost as excited about the box that it came in. I had to convince the delivery team to save it for me, and was surprised that they seemed shocked by my request. Have they not delivered glorious ginormous boxes to the homes of preschoolers before?

But what would we do with it? I put the question out to my Facebook page because I was interested in gathering a wide range of possibilities for N to choose from, and the responses ranged from hilarious (Carissa said, “it would MY ‘quiet place’ for the day and then the kids could have it tomorrow.”) to the fiscal (Bron said I might be able to sell it on ebay for $50!!). Lauren at 365 Great Children’s Books suggested “a castle…a cafe…a library…a puppet theater.” I ran these along with all the other ideas past my daughter who immediately said she wanted to make a cafe. But once she saw the box, she decided that it would be a FOOD TRUCK!

I pushed her play kitchen around to the back door (sadly, it was too tall to fit inside), cut a service window on one side, and added a couple quick tires to differentiate it from a fast-food place.

N added a cash drawer and a calculator, and was ready to take orders.

I asked her about the menu and she told me that I would be eating ravioli (actually a lovely assortment of rocks). I couldn’t quite nail down the theme of her truck because the next day she was making lemon crepes. It made me laugh when she packed my food up in a to-go bag!

As the day went on more things were added: hand soap (because her customers should have clean hands before eating) and the beginning of a menu (the red paper attached with purple tape).

We also added a window to the front of the truck, a chair for driving, a lighting system, and some employees.

Activities like this are great for imagination-building and open-ended play. We’ve only had this up for 2 days, but it’s already given us HOURS of fun. For more cardboard box ideas, go on over to our Cardboard Box Challenge, which shares the cardboard creations of nearly 25 creative education/parent bloggers.

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Your turn: What have you done with a LARGE box? Or what would you do with one?

If you have a fridge box link or a fridge box photo to share, feel free to do so in the comments.

This post is linked to It’s Playtime!