Rolled Easter Egg Painting

When my daughter was about 2 1/2, her very favorite art activity was rolling paint-coated marbles all over sheets of paper. We made Rolling Rock Paintings with smooth rocks and Spooky Marble Spider Webs for Halloween. With Easter coming up, I was inspired to make something fun with the plastic eggs that consume dollar stores across the country. Not only is this fun to do, but the set up is easy and it’s a novel way to celebrate the spring season. On the developmental/arts experience level, kids will make choices about the colors they use, they will be active (standing and moving!), and they’ll learn how to manipulate the uneven balance of a rolling egg (as opposed to a more predictable rolling marble).


  • Easter eggs. I used plastic, but just about any eggs will do. If you can pry the chocolate ones away from your kids, more power to you!
  • Paint. Tempera or biocolors. Washable is always preferable!
  • Paper
  • Tray to hold the paper. We used a wooden tray, but I’ve also had great success with an open cardboard box.

Before we got to rolling, N wanted to dip half-eggs in the paint…

And print them.

Then she took a closed egg, rolled it in red and white paint (because her favorite color is pink, and she’s proud of her color-mixing knowledge!)…

…and then rolled it on the paper.

A few colors later!

So much fun. And clean up wasn’t too difficult — as long as you keep those eggs on the paper and in the tray!

What do you think?

This post is linked to It’s Playtime

Dream Catcher

“If you have bad dreams you have to spit them out of your mouth and into the dream catcher.”

After a recent visit with some friends in their new house, my daughter could not stop talking about a dream catcher that they had. And she wanted one for herself. Of course. She also wanted a lofted bunk bed, but this isn’t a home decor blog, thank goodness!

The great part about this dream catcher moment is that her actual question was, “Can we MAKE a dream catcher?” Um, yes we can. (scramble, scramble…now how exactly does one make one of these?) When I asked her if she knew what dream catchers are for, she replied, “If you have bad dreams you have to spit them out of your mouth and into the dream catcher.” Well, not exactly, but gosh I’m going to miss these early years! If you want to know the real story behind dream catchers, read this.

What we used

  • thin wire
  • flexible piece of branch
  • embroidery thread
  • pom-pom

Twist branch into circular shape and secure it together. Our branch was a little bit short, so we ended up making more of a raindrop shape.

Secure thread with a big knot to the top of the twig and then start wrapping it. I imagined more of a natural color scheme, but my daughter wanted to use red wire and red yarn. Fair enough…it’s her dream catcher after all.

For a good tutorial on how and where to make these knots, read these instructions.

Many dream catchers are embellished with a feather, but N had her heart set on a pom-pom. A shiny pom-pom, actually.

We hung it above her bed with the hope that the pesky dreams might get tangled up in the yarn, while the good dreams could easily pass through the holes. Based on our experiences thus far there might be better ways to handle bad dreams, but it sure is nice to have a little bit of security dangling above us in those fragile moments.

Other ideas

left to right

1) Step-by-step tutorial on making a dream catcher from Hands on Crafts for Kids

2) Dream catchers made from Yogurt Lids from That Artist Woman

3) Make a simple dream catcher from a paper plate from 4 Crazy Kings

4) Whimsical Dream Catcher featured in Cookie Magazine from Nest Pretty Things on Etsy

How do you help your child/ren work through bad dreams?

Preschool Leaf Collage

Leaf Collage for Preschool


Sticky Leaf Collage is a great activity for preschool children. It encourages them to collect leaves, discuss what kind of trees the leaves come from, create a composition, and preserve their leaves in a viewing sleeve. The collage can late be used as a placemat or window display.

Leaf collage with contact paper for preschoolers

California has been hit by a heat wave, so staying inside our hot cave of a house is barely an option. Despite the heat, there’s a lot of fall madness in the air — you can’t miss the mountain of gourds and pumpkins piled up at the markets, leaves are turning colors, and my favorite…spiced pumpkin lattes in the coffee shops. Mmmmm…


Steps: Preschool Leaf Collage

  • Collect Leaves
  • Name them and discuss what you found
  • Cut two identical sheets of clear contact paper
  • Attach the leaves to sticky side of contact paper
  • Place another sheet of contact paper on top to seal the leaves in
  • Display your collage if you’d like

We began by pulling out some clear contact paper. I encouraged my daughter to feel its tackiness, and then we discussed the process of collecting leaves and sticking them to the paper. We found an Easter basket (wrong season, I know!) and then took a walk around the neighborhood in search of leaves and other flat-ish treasures. This, by the way, is how we landed on a lemonade stand, so it pays to get out of the house!

After collecting (and naming!) the leaves, N stuck them on half a sheet of contact paper (sticky-side up).

Make leaf collage with a toddler

She filled in most of the spaces…good for understanding spatial relationships!

And then we smooshed the other half of the contact paper on top of the leaves. This was followed by two more walks around the neighborhood and two more collages. In our books, this activity was a hit.

When we finally came inside, contact collaging continued with magazine cut-outs, post-its, and googley eyes.


Identification guide for  kids: New England leaves

Nature Detective Leaf Identification Sheet: UK

Leaf Identification Activities

Why do leaves change color?

More Art Projects for Toddlers

12 Simple Art Projects for Toddlers |
For more toddler art projects, you may enjoy the easy-to-set-up activities that use mainly everyday materials in 12 Simple Art Projects for Toddlers.

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