Eggs Dyed with Vegetables

naturally decorated eggs the chocolate muffin tree

I thought I’d wrap Egg Week up with a favorite egg project from last year: Decorating Eggs with Natural Dyes.

In case you’re just popping in, my friend Melissa over at The Chocolate Muffin Tree and I are posting unique egg-related activities or experiments each day this week, and here’s what we’ve covered so far:

There are so many fun commercial egg-dying products to choose from, and I love a box that promises technicolor tie-dye with coated glitter. My 3-year-old and I just tore through one of these and she had a great time with it. And did I mention that we’ve been eating eggs with all our meals this week? Small price to pay for some Egg Week fun.

If you have a little bit of time and an interest in introducing the magic of natural dyes to your child, this project is well worth your effort.

Click over here to find out what vegetable gave us this brilliant blue color!

naturally decorated eggs the chocolate muffin tree

And then check out The Chocolate Muffin Tree to see how she and her daughter made naturally dyed marbled eggs. They’re  beautiful, and the process will become one of your favorites, I’m sure.

egg week

So, although this marks the end of a very fun week of all-things-eggs, it’s not quite over yet…

I asked my creative and playful blog friends to share their own egg-related ideas and projects with me, and I’ve been overwhelmed with the response. I was planning to share them with you today, but there are so many ideas that I need a little time to pull it all together.

So, be sure to check back next week for one more day of eggs.

Until then, Happy Spring!

Science Experiment: The Floating Egg

sink or float

As I hovered the egg over a jar of water, I asked my 3.5 year old, “Will it sink or float?”and it reminded me of Dave Letterman’s funny sketch, “Will it Float?” Have you seen it? This science experiment is really easy to set up + clean up, and the lesson learned on the density of water actually stuck with my 3-year old daughter long after the experiment was over. Fun and success!

The set up

  • One egg
  • Clear container: I used a wide jar, but a tall glass would work and you won’t need as much salt
  • Water
  • A few cups of salt
  • Spoon to mix the solution

Step #1:

Place the egg in plain water and talk about whether or not it floats. Pretty simple — it most definitely sinks!

Step #2:

Start adding salt to the water. We added ours little by little, and tested the solution by adding the egg back into the water. My 3 year old poured while my 1-year old mixed. I love these moments when they work and play side-by-side.

Finally, it floats!

Baby Rainbow loved this step, as she could finally reach the egg, and had some fun picking it up and dropping it back into the water where it “bounced.”

The Science behind the Experiment

The egg won’t float in regular water because it’s heavier than the water. But adding salt to the water makes the water more dense than the egg, and it floats! We have a book called “Let’s Visit Israel,” and my 3-year old will talk about this phenomena when we reach the page about floating in the Dead Sea.

Taking it one step further

Steve Spangler Science has a great idea for dragging this out into one more step. Fill half of a tall glass (that an egg will fit in) with this salty solution and then slowly pour plain tap water down the sides of the glass, being careful not to mix the two solutions. Gently drop the egg in the solution and watch it sink past the plain water, only to stop on top of the salty water! How cool is that?!

Do you have a favorite science experiment?

This post is shared on It’s Playtime.