Science Fair Project Ideas

Are you in the market for some science fair project ideas? Well, hopefully this post will have you covered.

These twelve science experiments encourage children to test, tinker with, experiment, hypothesize, and evaluate various properties and phenomena.

Science Fair Project Supplies

Most of our favorite science experiments involve everyday, household supplies because they’re easy to come by and relatively safe for children to use. You’ll see that these science fair project ideas use materials like gummy bears, dish soap, food coloring, chocolate syrup, sand, lemons, eggs, celery, oil, Alka Seltzer, vinegar, plastic bags, pencils, salt, cotton balls, seeds, and candy.

Links to each of the science fair projects can be found below the block of photos.

Science Fair Project Ideas | TinkerLab

Growing Gummy Bear Experiment, TinkerLab

Elephant Toothpaste, Preschool Powel Packets

Kitchen Science: What Will Freeze First?, No Time for Flash Cards

Make Magic Sand, Paging Fun Mums

science fair project ideas for kids

Sink or Float Lemons, One Perfect Day

Crystal Egg Geodes, TinkerLab

Make a Lava Lamp, Hands on as we Grow

Colorful Celery Experiment and Capillary Action, TinkerLab

science fair project ideas

Melting Ice Experiment, The Chaos and the Clutter

Magical Plastic Bag Experiment, TinkerLab

Grow Beans on Cotton Balls, The Imagination Tree

Dissolving Peeps Experiment, Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas

Bonus: 10 Tips for a Fab Science Fair Board

10 Tips for a Great Science Fair Board | TinkerLab

Thanks to Handmade Kids Art for the excellent article on how to create a successful science fair board: 10 Tips for a Rockstar Science Fair Board

Which of these have you tried?

If you’ve tried any of these science fair project ideas, would you leave a quick comment? I know that our other readers would love hear about your experiences.

And, if you have a favorite science fair project that’s not listed here, will you share it in a comment? We’d love to make this a valuable resource for our readers like you!

Did you enjoy this post?

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12 Science Fair Project Ideas | TinkerLab


How to Blow Out an Egg, plus 3 Easy Tricks

Could you use some tips on how to blow out an egg and clean eggs for decorating? Hopefully, this will help you get started!

How to Blow out an Egg, plus 3 easy tricks


Today I’m excited to share three little tricks for simplifying blown-out eggs. Messy fun, right? If you’re a traditionalist, you might want to stop reading here. Otherwise, read on…

How to Blow out an Egg

Trick #1: Hand Drill

How to blow out an egg | TinkerLab

So, if you wanted a hollow egg, and were to puncture it in the traditional way, you might use a needle or a special egg-piercing tool like this.

But, if you’re running short on time or if you know your kids will be giddy at the site of a hand drill (do you see me raising my hand?), you could do what we did.

My Fiskateer friend, Angela (read my interview with Angela here), sent me this awesome little Fiskars hand-cranked drill that’s perfect for preschool hands. My kids (ages 4 and 2) didn’t drill the eggs, but I do recommend the drill if you’re looking for a beginner’s wood-working drill for older children.

I carefully drilled a hole in the top and bottom of the egg, and then blew the eggs out.

But that blowing business is an awful lot of work, which brings me to trick #2…

Trick #2: Baby Aspirator

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

If you have little kids in your house, chances are good that you have at least one of these lying around. Between my two kids and overly generous L & D nurses, we own about eight of these.

How to Blow out an Egg | TinkerLab

Yes please!!

As much as I like my tools, I also believe in tradition. When your kids are old enough to blow out an egg with their own lungs, this post from The Artful Parent will inspire you to help them give it a go.

Trick #3: A Box and Skewers

Once your eggs are blown out, you’ll want to decorate them.

The girls and I painted a few of our blown eggs with acrylic paint, and we used little espresso cups to keep our hands clean while also keeping the eggs from wobbling around the table.

This plan was moderately successful.

It worked beautifully for painting the top half of the egg, but as soon as you were ready to paint the other side there was the challenge of flipping the egg without ruining our work. Not to mention all that acrylic paint that crusted up on my cute mugs. Ugh.

blown eggs on skewer in box

Which is where this nifty idea comes in handy: Cut a few grooves into the edge of a box, push a skewer through your egg (you might have to make your holes a wee bit bigger to do this), and voila!

I can’t remember where I first saw this, but here are a few other folks that have tried this smart idea: Melissa at Chasing Cheerios used this technique to paint chalkboard and decoupaged eggs. And the Sydney Powerhouse Museum replaced the box with Tupperware, and then made charming hanging eggs.

How to Blow Out Eggs with 3 Easy Tricks | TinkerLab

Are any of these tricks new-to-you? I love learning new tricks…do you have another egg-decorating tip to share?

More Egg Decorating and Egg Activities

In case you missed our earlier posts, here’s what we’ve covered this week so far:

How to Make Natural Dye for Egg Decorating

Walking on Raw Eggs

Make Your Own Egg Tempera Paint

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

How to Make a Floating Egg

How to Walk on Raw Eggs. Really.

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Our Favorite Homemade Paint Recipes

Have you ever made your own paint?

6 Favorite Homemade Paint Recipes for Kids  |

If not, these homemade paint recipes are just the thing to get you started. You’ll be surprised at just how easy, fast, and affordable making your own paint can be.

Here are some of the reasons that we love to make our own homemade paint:

  1. It’s just plain fun to make things that you’d otherwise buy in the store.
  2. It can save you money.
  3. It can give you peace of mind to know that the ingredients in homemade paints are child-friendly.
  4. Making their own art materials teaches children to be resourceful and inventive.
  5. It could save you a trip to the art store.

6 Favorite Homemade Paint Recipes for Kids  |

Here are six of our favorite homemade paint recipes:

Puffy Sparkle Paint: Made from salt, flour, and water, this paint dries a little puffy and gets a bit of sparkle from the salt. Fill an empty glue bottle with this paint, and squeeze designs onto paper.

Finger Paint: A simple recipe of flour and water, heated over the stove, this goopy paint feels great on the hands.

Egg Tempera Paint: This very easy paint, made from egg yolks, dries with a beautiful sheen can also be a great lesson in how the Renaissance painters originally painted.

Microwave Puffy Paint: Squeeze this paint onto paper and then pop the artwork in the microwave for a truly puffy result. Very cool!

Sweetened Condensed Milk Paint: This may be the most delicious paint recipe yet!

Invisible Ink: Made from citrus juice, this is a fun one for little sleuths and spies.

Bubble Paint: A mixture of dish soap, water, and tempera paint makes this magical solution that can be used to form bubbles on the surface of paper.

6 Favorite Homemade Paint Recipes for Kids  |

More Homemade Art Materials

Jean Van’t Hul of The Artful Parent created this fantastic resource of 35 Homemade Art Materials Kids Can Make.

If you’re looking for a homemade paint recipe that’s not on this list, please add it in the comments and we will work hard to bring you what you’re looking for!


50 Earth Day Activities for Kids

Earth Day is our annual reminder to slow down and appreciate the bounty of the earth. The following 50 Earth Day Activities for kids will encourage children to create objects from natural and recycled materials and spend more time outdoors.

I hope you’ll find some inspiration here, and if you have more ideas to share, please add them to a comment so that others can enjoy them too.

Happy Earth Day!

50 Earth Day Activities for kids | TinkerLab

Earth Day Activities with Natural Materials

50 Earth Day Activities for kids | TinkerLab

Earth Day Activities with Recycled Materials

50 Earth Day Activities for kids | TinkerLab

Outdoor Art Earth Day Activities

50 Earth Day Activities for kids | TinkerLab

Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs

Have you ever thought about making vegetable dyed Easter eggs?

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets.

I’m trying to make a move away from synthetic food dyes and wanted to use natural, homemade dyes this year. Not only are these colors absolutely healthy for human consumption, but the process of making them is a wonderful lesson in creating art materials from scratch and can help children think critically about  how to achieve various colors colors.

As I was cutting the onions and beets I asked my daughter what colors she thought they’d make. I also asked questions like, “If I wanted to make blue dye, what might I make it with?”

She had fun making guesses based on what we had in our kitchen and garden, and also came up with her own wild suggestions such as, “let’s take the skins off the bananas to make yellow dye!”

How to Make Vegetable Dyed Easter Eggs

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets.


  • Hard boiled eggs
  • Skin from one onion, two beets, large handful of spinach, half head of red cabbage
  • Vinegar
  • Water
  • Bowls
  • Ice cream scooper
  • Rubber Bands
  • Stickers
  • Crayons
  • Parsley Sprigs
  • Cheesecloth

Make the dye

I set up four pots of dye:

Pot #1: Onion Skins

Pot #2: Beets

Pot #3: Spinach

Pot #4: Chopped Red Cabbage

Add about 3 cups of water and 2 tablespoons of vinegar to each pot. The vinegar helps the dye set onto the egg.

Cook the dyes for about 30 minutes and then strained the colored water into some bowls.

*Note, you could also experiment with hard-boiling your raw eggs in the dye itself. I’ve heard this works really well. 

Three Decorating Techniques

While the dye cooks and cools, this could be a good time to get your eggs ready for dipping.

How to dye Easter eggs with natural dyes like red cabbage, onion skins, and beets, and ideas on how to decorate them..

1. Wrap the Eggs with Rubberbands

We wrapped some eggs with rubber bands. Fine motor skill training for my almost 3-year old!

2. Cover Eggs with Stickers

We covered eggs with spring stickers and office stickers.

3. Color the Eggs with Crayons

And we drew on eggs with crayons. Nothing too crazy. The crayon will resist the dye. White crayon would make for more drama in the end, but my 2-year old had her heart set on blue.

How to Dye Easter Eggs

Some people like to use tongs or whisks to grab their eggs, but our ice cream scooper made for a good egg scooper.

Do you see that barely green water up there? That’s what transpired from cooking our spinach…for thirty minutes! Pale green water. As you can imagine, it didn’t do much to our eggs. Next time I think we’ll try using more spinach…or use green food coloring.

Have you had any success achieving a vibrant green color with natural dyes? I’ve heard that liquid chlorophyll is the best thing to use for green, but I haven’t tried it personally.

Pale Yellow from Onions

We unwrapped the eggs to reveal the hidden images!  This pale yellow color was made by the onion skins. We’ve also made yellow dye from ground turmeric (cooked the same as above), which it works really well.

Grey from Beets

It looks brown here, but the beets made a grey-ish color. Dye seeped into the openings of the bunny sticker, revealing a blotchy silhouette that’s still quite nice. A bunch of these all over an egg would be kind of cool, or a simpler sticker would look nice (scroll down for an example).

I’ve had success making a pale pink from beets, and I’m not quite sure what happened here.

Blue from Red Cabbage

But small stickers like this little butterfly left a clear impression. Lovely.

Brilliant blue came from the red cabbage! To make this egg, we wrapped cheesecloth around parsley sprigs and then dipped it in the cabbage dye. If you have pantyhose, that could work even better.

Hole Reinforcement Stickers on Easter Eggs

I found a new life for a stack of hole-punch reinforcement stickers! Don’t you love this? The grey color came from the beets (sad, because I was hoping for pink, but still beautiful), the egg in the back is a brown egg dipped in red cabbage dye, and the yellow egg is colored by onion skin.

Before tossing the cabbage leaves out, I wrapped them around an egg and popped it in the fridge overnight. Tie-dye egg!

This is part of a collaboration with my friend Melissa’s from The Chocolate Muffin Tree. For more natural egg dying ideas, visit Melissa at The Chocolate Muffin Tree.

More Egg Dying, Decorating, and Science Ideas

Three Easy Tricks for Blown Out Eggs

Egg Geodes Science Experiment

How to Make a Floating Egg

How to Walk on Raw Eggs. Really.

60 Egg Activities for Kids

Have you colored eggs with natural dye?

If you have, please share a tip, link, or photo!!