Seven Tips for Setting up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio

These are great ideas! 7 tips for setting up an impromptu outdoor art studio for kids.

The other day we had the most amazing weather, so we set up a garden art studio…

Summertime Art Tips: Seven Tricks to Set up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio.

When I was in college I always loved those teachers who took their classes outside on a nice day. So why not recreate that magic with our kids? Did you know that most children don’t spend enough time outdoors?

The Benefits of Making Art Outdoors

  1. Being outside is calming, restorative, and resets the mind.
  2. Nature is fodder for the imagination.
  3. Getting messy isn’t an issue.
  4. You can get up water some plants/play/dig a hole, and then return to making.

Summertime Art Tips: Seven Tricks to Set up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio.

Our Process

I offered my children a few after-lunch options that included reading in the garden, making art outside, and going on a hike. Can you tell that I wanted to spend some outdoors? The weather was that incredible.

My older daughter liked the idea of setting up a blanket on our lawn and helped me hatch a plan to create an art studio picnic. 

Within moments of setting it all up, which took us about ten minutes, the girls were deep into making. At this point I gleefully broke out my new garden sheers and tackled mountains of overgrown plants. Hack hack hack. Things had gotten so out-of-hand in my poor garden, which now looks rather normal, that it initially appeared quite bald as I managed to fill our entire composting bin with greenery.

Summertime Art Tips: Seven Tricks to Set up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio.

Meanwhile, I’d pop over to check on the kids periodically and captured 4-year old N as she decorated a big river rock with paint pens. More details on drawing on rocks over here. 

Summertime Art Tips: Seven Tricks to Set up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio.

Her little sister has been invested in painting lately and we knew that she’d enjoy easel painting. If you really can’t get outside, 10 Steps for Easy Indoor Easel Painting will help you bring the magic indoors.

I also have a stand-up easel, but I thought this would be a nice way to have the girls work side-by-side. It was a great strategy until the watercolor jars were knocked over onto the blanket. Ahem, we only own washable paints for moments like this.

Summertime Art Tips: Seven Tricks to Set up an Impromptu Garden Art Studio.

Also, this little easel has a tray to hold paint on both sides and I knew both kids would want to paint at the same time. All in all, it was a fantastic afternoon and just the sort of experience that I imagine we’ll invest in all summer long.

7 Tips for setting up a Garden Art Studio

First of all, it’s important to address that you don’t need a sprawling lawn to make this happen. A patio, stoop, or balcony work just fine. The important thing here is to get outside and enjoy some fresh air!

These are great ideas! 7 tips for setting up an impromptu outdoor art studio for kids.

  1. Wear play clothes, aprons, or nothing at all. 
  2. Wait for a warm day.
  3. Keep the materials simple and choose one or two basic projects. We chose watercolors + easel and rock painting.
  4. Have a water source nearby for washing up.
  5. Set up a picnic blanket so that little makers can get comfortable.
  6. Make sure you have a camera to capture these moments.
  7. If you’re painting, lay dry pieces out on the ground to dry. If it’s windy, dry them on a clothesline or indoors.

 

Set up a Permanent Outdoor Art Studio

Take a look at Meri Cherry’s inspiring outdoor art studio for ideas on how to build or set up a more permanent outdoor maker space.

How to set up a successful backyard art studio for kids | TinkerLab.com

Outdoors with Kids Resources

Tape paper to the wall for an Instant Outdoor Art Studio

Six Ways to Take Art Outdoors

11 Classic Summer Camp Crafts for Kids

Start a Family Nature Club with this Nature Tools for Families Toolkit (FREE download) from Children and Nature Network.  The Children and Nature Network is run by Audubon medal winner Richard Louv who wrote the bestseller, Last Child in the Woods. 

If you’re in the Bay Area, get your hands on a copy of Bay Area, Best Hikes with Kids: San Francisco Bay Area by Laure Latham. I just got it and it’s awesome!

A fabulous roundup of ideas for building outdoor forts and shelters for kids, from Let the Children Play.

Note: This post contains affiliate links, but I only share links to products that I love or that I think you’ll find useful.

Art making workshops with TinkerLab®

Drop-in Art-Making at the TinkerLab Studio

You might not know that behind the blogging scenes, I’m also an art educator and make art in a sunny studio in Palo Alto, CA. Our home is tiny and I’m blessed to have a little extra space to stretch into. The studio is a converted classroom in what was once Palo Alto’s Cubberley High School….

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Comments

  1. says

    Last summer in our art camp with a bunch of 4 yr olds we brought shaving cream outside and tables and let them go to town all over the tables. Of course, the shaving cream ended up all over them as well. They all looked like the abominable snowman. We then were able to hose them down to wash them off. considering it was in the high 80’s the water was quite welcome

  2. says

    Oh what a lovely day!
    Posts like this really make me miss having a backyard for my kids to play in and create their own fun. We’re lucky to have so many great parks and outdoor spaces for kids in the Bay Area but an outdoor space of your own is such a rare luxury :(
    Thanks for all the great links. I think I might just have to check out Laure’s book!

  3. says

    What an inspirational write-up! My girls love playing outside but we’ve never tried setting up an art studio in the backyard. Mostly when we’re hiking, they love creating nature art. With flowers thy create daisy chains, with pinecones they create stick people. With leaves and sticks they create sailboats. It all depends on the day’s find. And …. thanks a lot for mentioning my hiking book. I hope you’ll discover many nature spots you’ll love:)