How to Make a Paper Garland without Sewing

how to make paper garland without sewing

Today I have a wonderful project for you: How to make a paper garland without sewing.

It’s simple. Inexpensive. Easy. And virtually mess-free.

I’ve had a love affair with gigantic paper punchers ever since my children were introduced them in preschool. Tiny hole punchers are wonderful (and I’ll share my very favorite for young children in a sec), but these mega punchers can make big 2″ circles and they’re easy enough for little hands to use.

This colorful provocation is easy to set up, the mess is minimal, and, in usual TinkerLab style, it’s open-ended and the result will all depend on the child’s imagination.

Let’s get started..

Supplies

Large Paper Punch: Fiskars. My favorite!

Small Hole Punch:My kids are endlessly frustrated by the traditional punchers and this style is easy for small children to use.

Stickers

String

Paper Scissors

There are many ways to set this up. I have a growing collection of containers so I’ll show you a couple ideas.

Set it up in a caddy:

circle garland supplies

Or maybe in a shallow tray:

circle garland supplies

How to Make a Paper Garland without Sewing

Once your supplies are out, invite your child to make a garland. You can add some scissors to the setup. When I set this up for a large crowd last week, one boy turned a circle into a PacMan shape. One child made a garland to decorate his sister’s room and another turned her’s into a necklace.

So many possibilities!

When you’re done, hang your no-sew garland. Or wrap a gift with it. Or wear it as jewelry. Or…

circle garland with stickers

homemade paper necklace

make a paper garland no sew

Fiskars Round Large Punch – on sale for $9.99

fiskars large hole punch

See all of our recommended resources here.

TinkerLab Resource Guide

 

 

Fall Craft Ideas: Leaf Drawing

This fall craft idea is also a simple creative invitation that doesn’t require a lot of fancy tools and won’t come with a big mess. If you’re new to the idea of creative invitations, this article has all the details you’ll need to get started.

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

Supplies for Fall Leaf Drawing

  • Leaves
  • Colored pencils or your favorite mark-making tool
  • Paper

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

My 4-year old and I took a bike ride and she chose this selection of leaves. We arranged them on the table and she added a crystal. Because, you know, it looks better that way.

We marveled at all the colors in the leaves and then I invited her to draw them. We used Lyra Ferby colored pencils (affiliate link) for the task. I love these crayon/pencils for little kids because they’re a bit fatter than standard colored pencils (with a 6.25 mm lead core), and they come with a triangle grip that makes them easy to hold.

My daughter still insists on holding her pencil with her pinky and seems quite comfortable with this grip. And I’m still working on helping her shift to a better grip! If this is something that your child struggles with, this post has some great tips in the comments.

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing | TinkerLab

The Fall Leaf Drawing Set-up

Set up a large sheet of drawing paper, scatter a few leaves around, and place freshly sharpened colored pencils on the table.

Invite your child to look closely at the leaves and notice the variety of colors and shapes, and then discuss what you see.

Some questions to ask:

  • What colors do you notice?
  • Do any of the colors surprise you?
  • How many points does this leaf have? Let’s count them together.
  • Which of these leaves could have come from the same tree?
  • Do you have a favorite leaf in this collection? What makes it your favorite?

Fall Craft Ideas | Leaf Drawing  | TinkerLab

Experiments in Drawing Fall Leaves

I sat across the table from my daughter and we drew leaves together. I always encourage my kids to experiment, and one way to do that is by modeling. As I colored my leaves in I layered one color on top of another. I noted that the red blended into green on one of the leaves, and tried to replicate that in my sketch.

My 4-year old payed attention to that and then pushed it one step further as she colored one of her leaves blue and purple, and gave another blue veins…because she liked the way it looked. Rock on! If you child goes for the unexpected, encourage him or her to go for it. The goal is to use the leaves as a starting point, and then layer that with interpretation and imagination.

More Leaf Projects

Make adorable Leaf Critters by painting directly on leaves with acrylic paint.

Preserve your Fall leaves in glycerin

Make coffee filter suncatchers in leaf shapes

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  • How to simplify your life and make more room for creativity
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Creative Invitation: Paint and Looping Lines

CREATIVE INVITATION with paint and looping lines :: Tinkerlab Today we’re setting up a creative invitation that takes minutes to put together, and clean up is a snap.

As we shared in this post, the basic premise of Creative Invitations follows four simple steps:

  • Clear your table of anything that won’t be used in the invitation
  • Artfully arrange the materials to provoke ideas
  • Limit the choice of materials to just a few items
  • Provide clues about how to use the materials, but keep the project open-ended so that original ideas can flourish.

To get started, you could set up your invitation the night before as I did, or take a few moments to arrange it while your child is playing or napping. Or you could include your child in the set-up.

Supplies

  • Paint
  • Large sheet of paper
  • Water container
  • Paint brush
  • Washable tempera paint
  • Container to hold the paint
  • Sharpie marker (or other non-toxic permanent marker)
  • Rag

Set-up

Place all the materials out on the table. With a permanent marker, draw some basic shapes or looping lines on the paper.

Creative Invitaiton Paint and Looping Lines Process

Invitation

Invite your child to paint however he or she likes. You can see that my three-year old and five-year old had completely different approaches and ideas about how to tackle the paper. I love that! The goal isn’t to create anything in particular but to encourage your child to be inventive and use the parameters of the set-up as inspiration. Creative Invitaton Paint and Looping Lines :: Tinkerlab My three-year old’s creation on the left and my five-year old’s creation on the right: one painted inside the lines and the other right over the lines. Cool!

Clean-up

Leave the papers on the table to dry or move them to a drying area. Carry the brushes and water container to the sink. Voila!

More Creative Invitations

We love coming up with ways to make your life simpler and more creative, and creative invitations are one of our favorite ways to do that. If you enjoyed this post you might also want to check out Tape ArtSticker Composition with Frames, Washi Tape and Found Paper Collage. Tinkerlab plays host to a really fun Instagram hashtag: #creativetable. For more creative invitations, pop over to Instagram and search for more ideas from creative parents and artists. Also, our friends at The Art Pantry are hosting an Invitations to Create Challenge this month (October), and you can find out more about it here.