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Architecture as Art

“Architecture is a science arising out of many other sciences, and adorned with much and varied learning; by the help of which a judgment is formed of those works which are the result of other arts.” -Marcus Vitruvius Pollio, Roman architect and writer

We have a basket of blocks that come out every now and again, and when they do I’m always reminded of how much learning comes from building, stacking, and organizing blocks into innumerable configurations. ladyx

Do your kids play with blocks? What do you do to make them more appealing and fun for them?

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7 Comments

  1. Jena @ HappyLittleMesses:
    My boys love to build.  When they loose interest in blocks, I put them away and take out a different kind of blocks.  We have a variety to choose from.  Your standard wooden blocks, plain, wooden blocks that have been drawn on, duplos, alphabet blocks, large cardboard blocks, small colorful ones, some that look like cities, and then there are the accessories.  People, dinosaurs, cars, trains, etc.  The possibilities are endless.

  2. We always come back to blocks.  They never end up in a box in the basement with all the plastic junk!  Great photo!

  3. Rotation – that’s what works well here as well.

  4. I take a few blocks out of our big bucket and put them in an interesting container, like a small shoe box, and place that container in another room. It’s amazing how frequently those blocks get used for other types of fantasty play (for a 2.5 year old).

  5. I add other elements to  the blocks to extend their play.  Empty oatmeal container with the end cut out making a tunnel, paper towel and toilet tissue tubes, shoe boxes of various sizes and small vehicles.  I also include the blocks when I bring out the train tracks so they can build bridges, tunnels and cities.

  6. If your give your children pouch drinks, such as Capri Sun, use the empty boxes as large building blocks. You can also cut the blocks on the diagonal to make ramps. I teach preschool and these blocks are far and away the most popular. Children can also hammer golf tees (nails) into them! They are a gateway to imagination!

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