Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think. Margaret Mead

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.

-Margaret Mead

I love this quote, don’t you? It reminds me of the old tale about how you can lead a horse to water but you can’t teach it to drink. Today I’m sharing a short roundup of some of my favorite TinkerLab posts that talk about how we can encourage children to think for themselves, follow their own interests, and explore the ideas that inspire their curiosities.

Enjoy!

Rachelle

Eight Ways to Follow a Child’s Curiosities

Four Easy Steps to Follow a Child’s Interests

Documenting your child’s passions

How to be the “Guide on the Side”

Parents Reflect on What Art Education Means to Them

Rachelle Doorley Rachelle Doorley is a mom and an arts educator with a passion for helping families and teachers set up meaningful creative projects for kids. She's the author of the popular kids’ craft book and bestseller, TinkerLab: A Hands-on Guide for Little Inventors, and her articles and ideas on creativity and arts education have been featured in School Arts Magazine, Real Simple, and FamilyFun. Rachelle has an art studio. in Palo Alto, CA where she seeks out ways to make every day creative. Join the TinkerLab circle through our FREE newsletter.

Comments

  1. says

    This quote is so perfect! I love that it elevates critical thinking over external regulation. It seems to be very near the core of your project at Tinkerlab. I also want to thank you for providing the sketchbook challenge topics. Not only does this really jump start my own creativity, but I give my kids the day’s prompt as the head to school in the morning (they are in kindergarten), and by the time they come home to snacks and sketchbooks they are brimming with ideas and observations! All the best, Mandy

  2. says

    Hi Rachelle,
    Absolutely loved this post! This quote is very nice. Children have a great capacity to learn. If we care for our children at an early age, we provide them a great opportunity and ensure a good future for them. Then we don’t need to worry about telling them what to do: they will be able to think and take their own decisions.

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